Sector: Public Charter Schools

Wyoming State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

Each spring, parents face one of the biggest decisions they can make for their child’s future: What school environment will their child spend about 1,000 hours in next year? 

Making that decision confidently starts with knowing what options you have; you may have more school choices in Wyoming than you realize! Understanding these options can help you find a school where your child grows and learns to the best of their ability. Wyoming families can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Interested in Wyoming’s new Education Savings Account (ESA) program? Check out our deep-dive blog to learn more.

Wyoming Traditional Public Schools

Most Wyoming families choose traditional public schools, which are operated by school districts, free to attend, open to all students, and funded by taxpayers. In fact, 93.4% of Wyoming students attend a traditional public school. Did you know that, on average, Wyoming spends $18,144 per public school student each year? You can search your school’s spending and that of nearby schools at Project Nickel.

In Wyoming, the state allows each district to set its own open enrollment policies. Open enrollment refers to whether parents can send their children to any public school, regardless of where it is located. Parents wanting to transfer their child to a different public school than the one they are assigned should contact their local school district to see if this is an option.

As a real-world example, Natrona County Schools offers families a guide with information about curriculum and programming at different schools, and allows families to request their top choice school(s) rather than attend a zoned school. 

Open enrollment is an important choice, widening parents’ options and ensuring that their zip code isn’t the sole determiner of their education. Find out more about public schools in your state at the Wyoming Department of Education. You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools Without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking.”

Wyoming Charter Schools

Another public school option for Wyoming families are charter schools. Like traditional public schools, charter schools are public, free, and usually have no requirements for entry. What distinguishes charter schools is that they have extra freedom to innovate with curriculum and learning methods. In Wyoming, charter schools must be authorized by a local district or the new Wyoming Charter School Authorizing Board.

Wyoming passed charter school legislation in 1995. The state currently has at least five charter schools; these are located in Riverton, Laramie, Chugwater, and Cheyenne. Another charter school, Cheyenne Classical Academy, is approved to open in fall 2024. Each school has a charter which explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves, whether that be offering a STEAM program or providing project-based learning in a rural community.

If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system (like drawing random names out of a hat!) is typically used to determine admittance. 

Wyoming Magnet Schools

Magnet schools are free public schools that allow kids to narrow in on a specific learning track, such as an International Baccalaureate program or the performing arts. At a magnet school, all the subjects are taught through the lenses of that specific track. 

Unfortunately, there are no freestanding public magnet schools currently in operation in Wyoming. There may be magnet programs in traditional public schools, and the law allows for independent magnet schools, so stay tuned in the future! 

Wyoming Private Schools

Families in Wyoming can also consider private schools, nonpublic schools that charge tuition. Private schools may offer a unique curriculum, smaller class sizes, or a faith-based tradition. There are more than 30 private schools across the state of Wyoming. These come in all shapes and forms, from religious schools to schools designed for children with special needs.

The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,060 for elementary schools and $19,067 for high schools.

Starting in the 2025-2026 school year, students in Wyoming will have access to new funding opportunities! Wyoming has passed a bill known as the Wyoming Education Savings Account Act, which creates an ESA program to provide eligible families (students from families that earn up to 150% of the federal poverty level) with an online savings account amounting to $6,000 to help pay for a range of eligible expenses.

Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at ACE Scholarships-Wyoming and Private School Review: Wyoming.

 

Wyoming Online Learning

Online learning is another important school choice in Wyoming. Whether your child wants to accelerate his or her learning or needs a quieter environment in which to focus, you may be interested in giving virtual school a try. Wyoming offers several free, full-time online learning options for students across districts, like Wyoming Virtual AcademyWyoming Connections Academy, Cowboy State Virtual Academy, and Tech Trep Academy. Additionally, paid part-time options are available through a variety of providers.

Additionally, several Wyoming districts have developed local online school options, some of which may be open to out-of-district students. Many of these districts operate through Virtual 307, which provides a complete list of online programming available by grade and district.

To read more about online learning in Wyoming, check out the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

Wyoming Homeschooling

Wyoming families can also choose to homeschool, which allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. Homeschooling is the process of parents educating students at home. 

In Wyoming, it is required that you provide notice of your intent to homeschool annually prior to the school year beginning or prior to starting to homeschool. It is recommended that you formally withdraw from your public school so your student is not marked truant. 

Currently, 4.1% of K-12 students are homeschooled in the state of Wyoming. 

The state requires homeschooling parents to teach certain subjects (including reading, writing, and math), but does not require homeschoolers to take standardized testsNote that homeschoolers in Wyoming may still be eligible to participate in sports or activities at local public schools.

In 2023, legislators expanded the definition of homeschooling in Wyoming so that it can include more than one family. This makes it easier for homeschoolers to form co-ops and collaborate without losing homeschool protections. 

Read more details on homeschooling in Wyoming

 

Wyoming Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

Today, many Wyoming families are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are a couple of real examples of microschools and related resources in your state:  

 

  • Impact Wyoming is a group established in March 2020 to build stronger Wyoming communities through youth engagement.

 

Remember, microschooling is more a mentality than a specific legal distinction in most cases. Often, a family participates in a microschool while legally homeschooling, or being enrolled in a private or online school. 

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Choosing the Right School

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School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels

Microschooling and Mix-and-Match Learning

How can it empower parents and help kids achieve their dreams?

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7 Step Guide

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

View Guide

Education Resources for
Wyoming Parents

For additional information about school choices in
Wyoming, visit these resources:

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Wisconsin State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

Each spring, parents face one of the biggest decisions they can make for their child’s future: What school environment will their child spend about 1,000 hours in next year? 

Making that decision with confidence starts with knowing what school choice options you have. In fact, you may have more Wisconsin school choices than you realize! Understanding these options can help you find a great school for your child. And remember, each child is different. So, a great school for your neighbor’s child may look different than a great school for your child.

Wisconsin families can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Looking for special education options? You can learn what special education school choice services are available in Wisconsin at the Ultimate Guide to Special Education.

Wisconsin Traditional Public Schools

As you know, most children in Wisconsin (and in America) attend traditional public schools. Traditional public schools are free to attend, open to all students, operated by school districts, and funded by taxpayers like you. Did you know that, on average, Wisconsin spends $13,597 per public school student each year? 

In Wisconsin, about 77.6% of K-12 students are enrolled in traditional public school. In addition, about 8.5% of public school students use public school open enrollment. Open enrollment refers to whether parents can choose to send their child to any public school in Wisconsin, regardless of where they live or where the school is located. Based on Wisconsin’s laws, a parent may be able to choose a traditional public school in another district. In some cases, families can participate in open enrollment within a district as well. For example, the School District of La Crosse has an intradistrict application form families can use to request a transfer within the district.

The application window for public school transfers is usually February to April, with another window in late summer for children who have experienced bullying and children who have recently moved to Wisconsin.

Parents are generally responsible for transporting their child to their public school of choice, but the receiving school must provide transportation if a student has a disability. Low-income parents may apply for state reimbursement for transportation costs. Districts are allowed to choose to collaborate to provide transportation, as well. 

If open enrollment is an option for you, you can visit multiple public schools in your area and discover which is the best fit for your family. Traditional public schools aren’t all the same: They may differ in learning methods and one may just “feel different” than another to you. You can learn more about public schools in your state at the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools Without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking.”

Wisconsin Charter Schools

Another public school choice for Wisconsin families are charter schools. Like traditional public schools, charter schools are public, free, and usually have no requirements for entry. What distinguishes charter schools is that they are allowed extra freedom to innovate with curriculum and learning methods and held accountable to authorizing bodies for results. In Wisconsin, 5.1% of students attend a charter school.

As of the 2022-2023 school year, Wisconsin families can choose from more than 230 public charter schools. Each school has a charter which explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves, whether that be providing an outdoor learning program or offering a Native American language immersion. If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system (like drawing random names out of a hat!) is usually used to determine admittance.

In 2023, Wisconsin signed a bill to increases the amount of funding that charter schools receive per pupil. You can learn more about charters at the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction’s charter school page

Wisconsin Magnet Schools

You can also choose magnet schools! These free public schools allow kids to narrow in on a specific learning track, such as engineering or the arts. Magnet schools teach all subjects through the lenses of that specific track. Wisconsin has several magnet schools scattered throughout the state. You can view some of these magnet programs, for instance, on the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction website. As just one example of Wisconsin’s magnet choices, Spring Harbor Middle School in Madison has an environmental studies magnet. A magnet school might be a good option if your child learns best by focusing on a subject they are passionate about. 

Wisconsin Private Schools

Private schools offer a unique learning environment that may be smaller in size, pass on a specific religious tradition, or provide a different curriculum than is available in your district school. Wisconsin’s more than 900 private schools come in all shapes and sizes. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $4,083 for elementary schools and $8,481 for high schools. 

While private schools do charge tuition, any Wisconsin taxpayer can deduct the cost of private school tuition. Also, Wisconsin students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) are eligible to apply for the state’s special needs scholarship program, which can be used toward private school. 

Additionally, Milwaukee students from families who meet certain income requirements can apply to the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program, and students in Racine who meet similar requirements can apply to the Racine Parental Choice Program. Low-income students not assigned to the Milwaukee Public Schools or Racine Unified districts may also be able to apply for a private school voucher.

More than 52,000 students statewide use Wisconsin’s vouchers program to find a good private school fit! In fact, students participating in Wisconsin’s private school choice programs will soon receive a funding boost: A bill passed in 2023 increases the amount of funding that students receive in 2023-2024 and 2024-2025. Currently, 5.7% of K-12 students in Wisconsin are participating in private school choice program.

Learn more at School Choice Wisconsin or Private School Review: Wisconsin

Wisconsin Online Learning

Don’t overlook virtual learning just because it is off the beaten track. It offers a uniquely flexible learning environment that meets a variety of family needs. Whether your child wants to accelerate his or her learning or needs a quieter environment in which to focus, you may be interested in giving virtual school a try. 

In Wisconsin, students can access several free, full-time online school programs. These include Wisconsin Connections Academy, Wisconsin Virtual Learning, iForward, and Wisconsin Virtual Academy. K12-Stride, the online education provider that powers Wisconsin Virtual Academy, also offers Destinations Career Academy of Wisconsin, a technical skills-based online school for students in grades 9-12. 

You can find a complete list of virtual charter schools at the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. As of 2023, there were more than 20 entirely virtual charter schools serving all grades K-12. For example, Bridges Virtual Academy is a virtual charter school that allows families to personalize curricular choices from approved lists. Note that in order for funding to follow a student to an online charter school, their family may be required to submit an Alternative Application through the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

Plus, many Wisconsin districts are developing or expanding their own blended, hybrid, or fully online options for families. The Green Bay Area Public School District, for example, has blended learning programs for all grades. Some districts, including 8 of Wisconsin’s 11 largest districts, partner with the Wisconsin e-School Network to provide their students summer school or part-time or full-time online classes.

For part-time classes, middle-school and high-school students in Wisconsin may also be able to enroll through their local public or private school in the state virtual school: Wisconsin Virtual School. There may be fees attached and you should connect with your school to learn more. 

To read more about online learning in Wisconsin, check out the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

Wisconsin Homeschooling

Wisconsin families can also choose to homeschool, which allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. Homeschooling is the process of parents educating students at home. All 50 states allow parents to homeschool.

In Wisconsin, 4.1% K-12 students are homeschooled. It is required that you provide notice of your intent to homeschool by October 15, annually. It is recommended that you formally withdraw from your public school so your student is not marked truant. In the case that you decide to return to public school, you should notify the school via form PI-1206 or by contacting the School Management Services Team at the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. Placement is determined by each district individually.

The state requires homeschooling parents to teach certain subjects (like reading, math, and social studies) but does not require homeschoolers to take standardized tests. Note that homeschooled students in Wisconsin may still be eligible to participate in sports or activities at local public schools.

You can learn more at the Wisconsin Parents AssociationHome School Legal Defense Association – Wisconsin, and Green Bay Area Christian Homeschoolers.

Wisconsin Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

Today, many Wisconsin families are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are real examples of microschools and related resources in your state:  

  • Hickory Hill Academy is an innovative 10-acre private school that offers enrichment opportunities, like an afterschool environmental program. 

 

 

  • Kickapoo Valley Forest School, technically a public charter school, is an outdoor education program committed to an 1:8 child to adult ratio. 

 

  • Field Workshop in Greendale, along with the Greendale School District and Greendale Parks and Recreation, has launched a pilot program to offer enrichment learning for homeschool and virtual learning students. 

 

Remember, microschooling is more a mentality than a specific legal distinction in most cases. Often, a family participates in a microschool while legally homeschooling, or being enrolled in a private or online school. 

Download the School Choice Snapshot for Wisconsin

Download Snapshot

What is School Choice

How can it empower parents and help kids achieve their dreams?

Read More

Choosing the Right School

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

Get Tips

Search for Schools Near Me

School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels

Microschooling and Mix-and-Match Learning

How can it empower parents and help kids achieve their dreams?

Read More

7 Step Guide

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

View Guide

Every state is different when it comes to school choice options.

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West Virginia State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

“What are my school choices in West Virginia?” It’s a great question. There are a variety of options available for West Virginia families. Knowing these options can help you find a learning environment where your child is actively learning and growing. 

In West Virginia, families can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Looking for special education options? You can learn what special education services are available in West Virginia at the Ultimate Guide to Special Education.

West Virginia Traditional Public Schools

Most West Virginia families choose traditional public schools (90.6% K-12 students), which are operated by school districts, free to attend, open to all students, and funded by taxpayers. Did you know that, on average, West Virginia spends $13,059 per public school student each year? You can search your school’s spending and that of nearby schools at Project Nickel.

West Virginia expanded its public school open enrollment policies in 2023. Open enrollment refers to whether parents can send their children to any public school, regardless of where it is located. Now, West Virginia county boards must establish open enrollment policies and schools cannot charge tuition for transfer students. There are just a few situations in which a transfer request may be denied, such as when there is lack of capacity in the student’s grade level, or when the student has previously been expelled.

Open enrollment is an important way that parents have access to a broader variety of public schools; if you would like to participate in open enrollment, contact your school district to learn more.

For a real-world example of open enrollment, check out Wayne County Schools’ transfer application form. Find out more about public schools in your state at the West Virginia Department of Education. You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools Without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking.”

West Virginia Charter Schools

Like traditional public schools, charter schools are public, free, and usually have no requirements for entry. What distinguishes charter schools is that they have extra freedom to innovate with learning methods. Public charter schools are accountable to authorizing bodies (like school districts or colleges) for results.

West Virginia passed legislation authorizing charter schools in 2019. In 2021, the state passed a law creating a new authorizer for charter schools. It also expanded the number of charter schools that could be established in a three-year period from three to 10 schools and allowed for up to two statewide virtual charter schools.

Excitingly, West Virginia now has five charter schools open to students. These include three brick-and-mortar schools: Eastern Panhandle Preparatory Academy in Jefferson County, West Virginia Academy in the greater Morgantown area, and the Workforce Initiative for Nurses (WIN Academy) in the Kanawha Valley. Two virtual charter schools are also available: Virtual Prep Academy and West Virginia Virtual Academy. More charter options may be on the way; two new schools are authorized to open in fall 2024!

Each school has a charter which explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves, whether that be providing a nursing degree program like WIN Academy or offering a rigorous, literacy-based curriculum. If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system (like drawing random names out of a hat!) is usually used to determine admittance. 

West Virginia Magnet Schools

Magnet schools are free public schools that allow kids to narrow in on a specific learning track, such as engineering or the performing arts. At a magnet school, all the subjects are taught through the lenses of that specific track. West Virginia has a handful of magnet schools scattered throughout the state, and these might be a good option if your child learns best by focusing in on a subject they are passionate about. For example, you can read about some of the magnet choices in the Kanawha County Schools. And in Berkeley County Schools, Howe Hall Arts Infused Magnet School offers students learning through the arts. You can contact your school district to see if there are any magnet choices near you.

West Virginia Private Schools

Families in West Virginia can also consider private schools, nonpublic schools that charge tuition. Private schools may offer a unique curriculum, smaller class sizes, or a faith-based tradition. West Virginia’s private schools come in all shapes and forms, from religious schools to schools designed for children with special needs. 

There are more than 100 private schools across the state of West Virginia. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $6,358 for elementary schools and $6,617 for high schools. 

In 2021, West Virginia created the Hope Scholarship program, which allows students currently enrolled in public school or about to enter kindergarten to use their education tax dollars for private school tuition, tutoring, educational therapy, or other learning expenses. More than 5,000 (2.2%) students have been awarded Hope Scholarships for the 2023-2024 school year. The Hope Scholarship amount is currently $4,488.

In 2023, West Virginia passed a law making it easier for Hope Scholarship students and other non-traditional students to participate in extracurriculars at their local public school. You can hear stories of the Hope Scholarship’s impact on private schools, as well as stories of other learning choices in West Virginia, at the We Have Hope podcast.

Learn more at Private School Review: West Virginia. 

West Virginia Online Learning

Whether your child wants to accelerate his or her learning or needs a quieter environment in which to focus, you may be interested in giving virtual school a try. In West Virginia, each district is required to offer a full-time virtual program for students in grades 6-12.

West Virginia public school students can access part-time or full-time online learning for free through the West Virginia Virtual School. Enrollment takes place through a student’s local school district, which may set guidelines and determine the number of courses a student can take. Non-public and homeschool students can access the virtual courses by enrolling as a part-time student in their local school. Fees apply for summer online courses, and in some other cases.

There are also two virtual charter schools open to West Virginia students statewide. These schools are the Virtual Preparatory Academy of West Virginia and West Virginia Virtual Academy, which has a career-technical focus.

Finally, in some cases, districts have developed their own virtual offerings, like Kanawha County Schools Virtual School or Berkeley County Virtual School.

To read more about online learning in West Virginia, check out the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

West Virginia Homeschooling

West Virginia families can also choose to homeschool, which allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. All 50 states allow the process of parents educating students at home.

In West Virginia, 4.4% of K-12 students are homeschooled. Notice of your decision to homeschool if required either by seeking school board approval or by submitting a notice of intent. This notice of intent is required before you begin homeschooling or when moving to a new county. It is recommended that you formally withdraw from your public school so your student is not marked truant. 

The state requires homeschooling parents to teach certain subjects, and also may require some level of assessment of homeschoolers. Note that, in some cases, homeschoolers in West Virginia are still eligible to participate in sports or activities at their local public school. Additionally, West Virginia has strong statutory language advocating for a student’s right to part-time enrollment. With approval from their county board, a homeschooler can take a course at a local public school.

While misinformation about homeschooling has recently spread in a couple of West Virginia counties, the truth is that homeschool students in West Virginia receive credit, diplomas, and transcripts recognized by state law. Find more resources about homeschooling in West Virginia at the Home School Legal Defense Association, or join the state’s largest Facebook group for homeschoolers.

West Virginia Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

Today, many West Virginia families are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are a few examples of innovative education options in West Virginia: 

  • The Midian Leadership Project in Charleston aims to develop community leaders through holistic educational and social support and sports-related programming for young people ages 10 and up. The project hopes to expand into a small private school for boys. 

 

  • City on a Hill in Fairmont is a microschool aiming to provide excellent academics with a Biblical worldview and focus on servant leadership. 

 

  • Vandalia Community School in Charleston draws on Montessori principles and outdoors learning for its small-group learning experience. 

 

 

  • MicroschoolingWV is West Virginia’s local partner of the National Microschooling Center.

 

  • Expression Prep Academy, starting in Huntington, is a microschool that emphasizes parent partnerships and critical thinking skills. 

 

In most states, microschooling is more of a mentality than a legal distinction. Often, families participate in microschooling while homeschooling or being enrolled in a private school or online school. However, in 2022, West Virginia became one of the first states to sign official definitions of learning pods and microschools into law, distinguishing them from other types of schooling. According to the bill, a learning pod in the state is ““a voluntary association of parents choosing to group their children together to participate in their elementary or secondary academic studies as an alternative to enrolling in a public school, private school, homeschool, or microschool.”

West Virginia law defines a microschool as “a school initiated by one or more teachers or an entity created to operate a school that charges tuition for the students who enroll and is an alternative to enrolling in a public school, private school, homeschool, or learning pod.”

In West Virginia, families participating in learning pods or microschools are exempt from compulsory school attendance, but must meet certain requirements. For example, parents must notify the county superintendent or county board of their intent to participate in a learning pod or microschool, and students must complete annual assessments that are submitted to the county superintendent. With approval from their county board, students participating in a learning pod or microschool in West Virginia may participate in part-time classes at their local school.

Download the School Choice Snapshot for West Virginia

Download Snapshot

What is School Choice

How can it empower parents and help kids achieve their dreams?

Read More

Choosing the Right School

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

Get Tips

Search for Schools Near Me

School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels

Microschooling and Mix-and-Match Learning

How can it empower parents and help kids achieve their dreams?

Read More

7 Step Guide

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

View Guide

Education Resources for
West Virginia Parents

For additional information about school choices in West Virginia, visit these resources:

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Washington State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

“What are my school choices in Washington?” It’s a great question. There are a variety of K-12 education options available for Washington families. Knowing these options can help you find a learning environment that inspires your child and equips them for success. Even if your current school works well for you, it’s good to know the other options available for families in Washington! 

In Washington, families can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Looking for special education options? You can learn what special education services are available in Washington at the Ultimate Guide to Special Education.

Washington Traditional Public Schools

First, most children in Washington (about 87.3% of K-12 student) attend traditional public schools. Traditional public schools are free to attend, open to all students, and operated by school districts. They are funded by taxpayers like you. Did you know that, on average, Washington spends $15,570 per public school student each year? You can search your school’s spending and that of nearby schools at Project Nickel.

Washington offers some open enrollment for public school. Open enrollment refers to whether parents can choose to send their child to any public school in Washington, regardless of where they live or where the school is located. Based on Washington’s laws, families are able to apply for transfers within their school district. Whether families can choose to transfer between districts will depend on local policies, so check with your school district if you are interested in this option. For a real-world example, you can check out Lake Washington School District’s open enrollment forms and guidelines.

If open enrollment is an option for you, visit multiple public schools in your area and discover which is the best fit for your family. After all, traditional public schools aren’t all the same. They may differ in learning methods and one may just “feel different” than another to you. 

Besides traditional public schools, Washington also has 14 “Skill Centers” that serve highschoolers across multiple school districts who want to gain specialized career training. Find out more about public schools in your state at the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI). You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools Without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking.”

Washington Charter Schools

Another public school choice for Washington families are charter schools. Like traditional public schools, charter schools are public, free, and usually have no requirements for entry. What distinguishes charter schools is that they have extra freedom to innovate with learning methods and are accountable to authorizing bodies for results. 

There are currently more than 15 operating charter schools in Washington, serving nearly 5,000 (0.4%) students. A charter may be an option for you if you live in Bremerton, Midway, Tukwila, Seattle, Vancouver, Renton, Bellingham, Walla Walla, Pullman, Wenatchee, or Spokane. One of the state’s newest charter schools is Rooted School in Vancouver, which aims to graduate students with “a diploma in one hand, a job offer in the other.”

Each school has a charter which explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves. For example, that might be providing a STEAM program or offering a rigorous, literacy-based curriculum. If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system (like drawing random names out of a hat!) is usually used to determine admittance. 

You can learn more at the Washington State Charter Schools Association.

Washington Magnet Schools

You can also choose magnet schools! Magnet schools are free public schools that allow kids to narrow in on a specific learning track, such as engineering or the performing arts. At a magnet school, all the subjects are taught through the lenses of that specific track. If there is one in your area with a theme that interests your child, this could be an exciting option to consider. In Washington, 1.5% of K-12 students attend a magnet school.

Washington actually established one of the nation’s first magnet schools in 1968. Today, Washington has several magnet schools and programs throughout the state. For instance, Lake Washington School District launched Tesla STEM High School, and any rising 6th grader in the district is welcome to apply to the International Community School or the Environmental and Adventure School. The Bellevue School District offers a Mandarin magnet, and Vancouver Public Schools offers the STEM-focused Vancouver iTech Preparatory

Washington Private Schools

Families in Washington can also consider private schools, nonpublic schools that charge tuition. Private schools may offer a unique curriculum, smaller class sizes, or a faith-based tradition. Washington’s private schools come in all shapes and forms, from religious schools to schools designed for children with special needs.

There are about 750 private schools across the state of Washington. As of the 2022-2023 school year, Washington private schools served more than 81,000 students. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $12,392 for elementary schools and $14,060 for high schools. Unfortunately, there are no state-run private school tuition assistance in Washington to help families with the cost of private school. But, private scholarships may be available. Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at the Washington Federation of Independent Schools, the Fulcrum Foundation, and Private School Review: Washington.

Washington Online Learning

Whether your child wants to accelerate learning or needs a quieter environment, you may be interested in trying virtual school. Washington offers several free, full-time online learning options open to students statewide, like Washington Virtual Academies, Washington Connections Academy, Virtual Prep Academy of Washington, Columbia Virtual Academy and the Insight School of Washington

The Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction has compiled a complete list of the more than 100 districts that offer online learning options, either full-time or part-time. Many of these online options are multi-district, allowing students to enroll from across districts. The Office also offers a helpful Frequently Asked Questions sheet for families.

In Washington, if your child’s school district doesn’t offer online learning options, you may request a “choice transfer” into another approved online school program. Getting a choice transfer release from your school district each year allows for funding to follow your student.

To learn more about online learning in Washington, you can also check out the Digital Public School Alliance – WA and the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

Washington Homeschooling

Washington families can also choose to homeschool, which allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. Homeschooling is the process of parents educating students at home. All 50 states allow this option. In Washington, more than 29,000 (2.4%) students homeschooled as of the 2022-2023 school year. Washington homeschooling parents must teach specific subjects (including math, reading, and history) and annual assessments are required for homeschooled students.

If you switch to homeschooling, notice of your intent to homeschool is required by September 15 or within two weeks of any quarter, trimester, or semester. It is recommended that you formally withdraw from your public school so your student is not marked truant. In the case that you decide to return to public school in the middle of the school year, your homeschool records or testing will be reviewed for placement.

Homeschoolers in Washington may still be eligible to participate in sports at local public schools. Plus, homeschoolers are eligible to receive ancillary services, including “counseling, psychological services, testing, remedial instruction, speech and hearing therapy, health-care services, [and] tutorial services” offered by local school districts, at no additional cost. Some Washington school districts even offer academic and enrichment activities for homeschool families through Parent Partnership Programs.

If you think homeschooling could be a good fit for your family, learn more through resources specific to Washington. You may also want to check out Washington Homeschool Organization, Christian Family Home Educators, or Christian Heritage Home Educators of Washington.

Washington Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

Today, many Washington families are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a distinct commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are real examples of microschools and related resources in your state:  

  • KapKa Cooperative School is an independent school focused on experience-based curriculum and serving grades K-5 in Seattle. 

 

  • LEADPrep is an independent, nonprofit microschool with campuses in North Seattle and Kirkland.

 

  • WEEKDAYS offers small-group learning with unique focus areas like music, STEM, and outdoor learning for young children.

 

 

Remember, microschooling is more a mentality than a specific legal distinction in most cases. Often, a family participates in a microschool while legally homeschooling, or being enrolled in a private or online school. 

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School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
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Virginia State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

If you’re wondering about school choice in Virginia, here are two things to remember. First off, you’re not alone. Every year, tens of thousands of parents in Virginia make K-12 school decisions for their children. Secondly, you can do it! Understanding your state’s different school options can help you find a learning environment where your child is not just “getting by” at school, but actually thriving and inspired to learn. 

This post will break down the school choice options available for the nearly 2 million children living in the Old Dominion State. In short, families can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Looking for special education options? You can learn what special education services are available in Virginia at the Ultimate Guide to Special Education.

Virginia Traditional Public Schools

Most Virginia families choose traditional public schools. These are operated by school districts, free to attend, open to all students, and funded by taxpayers. In Virginia, 73.1% of all K-12 students attend a traditional public school. Did you know that, on average, Virginia spends $13,835 per public school student each year? You can search your school’s spending and that of nearby schools at Project Nickel.

In Virginia, the state allows each district to set its own open enrollment policies. “Open enrollment” refers to whether parents can send their children to any public school, regardless of where it is located. Parents wanting to transfer their child to a different public school should contact their local school district to see if this is possible. For example, Albemarle County Public Schools generally requires students to attend their zoned school, but does allow transfers in some cases, such as for medical or emotional health, or because of a family move. In Virginia, while a transfer within your district may be possible, transfers between districts are generally not available and may cost.

Open enrollment is a valuable public school choice, increasing parents’ options and ensuring that zip code isn’t the sole determiner of their education. Find out more about public schools in your state at the Virginia Department of Education. You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools Without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking” and “Virginia Public School Divisions’ Tuition Rates Charged to Transfer Students.

Virginia Charter Schools

Also, depending on where you live in Virginia, public charter schools may be another free option for you to consider. Like traditional public schools, charter schools are public, free, and usually have no requirements for entry. What distinguishes charter schools is that they have extra freedom to innovate with learning methods. Charters are accountable to authorizing entities for results. 

Virginia passed charter school legislation in 1998. Today, Virginia has seven public charter schools. Each school has a charter which explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves, whether that be providing a Spanish immersion program or offering a rigorous STEAM curriculum. If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system is usually used to determine admittance.

Virginia Lab Schools

In 2023, the Governor’s Office announced plans to develop more than a dozen public “lab schools.” While not charter schools, these lab schools share some common features. Lab schools are educational institutions that offer unique and innovative learning opportunities to students ranging from preschool to grade 12.

Lab school programs can be specifically tailored to the needs of a particular community or student population. Some even being customized to meet the individual requirements of students with special educational needs, gifted students, or other specific student populations.

Enrollment in lab schools is open to Virginia residents, but admission is based on a lottery system and depends on availability. Therefore, interested families should apply well in advance of the academic year if they wish to enroll. Lab school applications must be submitted before February 2, 2024.

Virginia’s first lab school is CodeRVA Regional High School, which prepares students for computer science careers.

Learn more at the Virginia Department of Education.

Virginia Magnet Schools

Additionally, Virginia families have a third public school option in magnet schools. Magnet schools are free public schools that allow kids to narrow in on a specific learning track, such as an International Baccalaureate program or the performing arts. Magnet schools teach all subjects through the lenses of that specific track. These schools can be good options for children who learn best through their favorite subject. In Virginia, 14.1% of all K-12 students attend a public magnet school.

Virginia has several magnet school options, including the well-ranked Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. School districts with magnet schools include Fairfax County Public Schools, Newport News Public Schools, York County School Division, Hampton City Schools, and more. Virginia magnet choices range from marine science to global studies and creative arts.

Virginia Private Schools

Families in Virginia can even consider private schools, nonpublic schools that charge tuition. Private schools may offer a unique curriculum, smaller class sizes, or a faith-based tradition. Virginia’s more than 1,000 private schools come in all shapes and forms, from religious schools to schools designed for children with special needs.

The average tuition for private schools in the state is $13,434 for elementary schools and $17,265 for high schools. In Virginia, a state-run scholarship program is available to students with family incomes below 300% of the federal poverty level ($83,250 for a family of four in 2022-2023) and students with special needs. Also, the federal government does allow parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts. Currently, 0.4% of all K-12 students participate in a private school choice program in Virginia.

Learn more at the Virginia Council for Private Education and Private School Review: Virginia.

Virginia Online Learning

Also, don’t overlook online learning! It offers a uniquely flexible learning environment that meets a variety of family needs. Whether your child wants to accelerate his or her learning or needs a quieter environment in which to focus, you may be interested in giving virtual school a try. 

Virginia students can enroll in free, full-time online learning through Virginia Virtual Academy. Additionally, K-12 students may be able to take part-time or full-time online classes through their local school in partnership with the state’s virtual school, Virtual Virginia. Tuition is usually covered by the public or private school in which the student is enrolled, or the parents if the student is homeschooled.

In some areas, districts have also developed their own part-time or full-time online school programs. These include Prince William County Public Schools’ Virtual High SchoolFairfax County Public Schools’ Online CampusLoudoun County Public Schools’ supplemental online coursesYork County School Division’s Virtual Academy, Chesapeake Virtual Academy, and Virginia Beach City Public Schools’ Digital Campus.

Virginia students are actually required to take at least one online course or blended learning experience to graduate. To read more about online learning in Virginia, check out the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

Virginia Homeschooling

In all 50 states, families can also choose to homeschool, which allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. Homeschooling is the process of parents educating students at home. About 57,000 (4.1%)Virginia students are currently homeschooling!

In Virginia, it is required that you provide notice of your intent to homeschool by August 15 or immediately upon choosing homeschool. A unanimous Virginia Supreme Court decision in 2020 emphasized that this step is a simple notification rather than a request to the school board. This court decision also ruled that school boards cannot establish their own demands for homeschooling families. 

The state does not require homeschooling parents to teach specific subjects but may require some amount of standardized testing depending on the homeschool option chosen. In general, children who are homeschooled may face roadblocks if they want to participate in public school sports in Virginia. However, you can always look for other sports leagues or co-ops near you.

If you choose homeschooling, it is recommended that you formally withdraw from your public school so your student is not marked truant. If you decide to return to public school, your school will review your homeschool records and may administer tests for placement. 

To learn more, you may wish to check out the Home Educator’s Association of Virginia and Home School Legal Defense Association – Virginia.

Virginia Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

Today, many Virginia families are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a distinct commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are a few real examples of microschools and related resources in your state:  

  • The Grand Magnolia School, a microschool in Richmond, has a cohort-based learning model and 4:1 student-to-teacher ratio, allowing children to receive an extremely customized, intentional education. 

 

  • Cultural Roots Homeschool Cooperative is a learning community with programming around the diverse cultural attributes, traditions, and histories of Black, Brown, and Indigenous communities.

 

  • Path of Life Learning offers a nurturing, faith-based learning pod environment for homeschoolers online school students.

 

  • Solstice Hybrid Academy provides homeschool-style learning with personalized guidance and creative opportunities in Norfolk.

 

  • Aquinas Learning, based out of Manassas, offers a classical homeschool curriculum that some families use together at Aquinas Learning centers, either in-person or virtual. 

 

  • Richmond Primary School is a private microschool located in Richmond that offers education for students from kindergarten to fifth grade.

 

  • RISE Hybrid Academy evolved from a small community homeschool program to a nationally accredited, K-12th grade private school. The school offers on-site learning options as well as homeschool curriculum. 

 

  • Dream Tech Academy in Hopewell was founded to give children a more personalized learning opportunity through small-group classes. The small school also offers tutoring and summer camp opportunities. 

 

  • Path of Life Learning is a modern, God-centered small-group learning center. K-2 students use a classical homeschool curriculum while families of older students can choose the online or homeschooling curriculum that works best for them.

 

 

Remember, microschooling is more a mentality than a specific legal distinction in most cases. Often, a family participates in a microschool while legally homeschooling, or being enrolled in a private or online school. 

Download the School Choice Snapshot for Virginia

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What is School Choice

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Choosing the Right School

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

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Search for Schools Near Me

School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels

Microschooling and Mix-and-Match Learning

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7 Step Guide

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

View Guide

Education Resources for
Virginia Parents

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Virginia, visit these resources:

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Vermont State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

Wondering about school choice in Vermont? There are a variety of options available for Vermont families. Knowing your options can help you find a learning environment where your child is thriving at school, not just “getting by.” 

In Vermont, families can choose from traditional public schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Looking for special education options? You can learn what special education services are available in Vermont at the Ultimate Guide to Special Education.

Vermont Traditional Public Schools

Many Vermont families choose traditional public school for their child. Currently, 86.9% of K-12 students attend a traditional public school in Vermont. Traditional public schools are operated by school districts, free to attend, open to all students, and funded by taxpayers. Did you know that, on average, Vermont spends $23,586 per public school student each year? You can search your school’s spending and that of nearby schools at Project Nickel.

Vermont has unrestricted open enrollment for public high school and transfers for younger grades are widely available as well. What this means is that you may be able to send your child to any public school in Vermont, regardless of where you live or where the school is located. Note that local boards of education may set limits on transfers based on financial impact and capacity.

You can take advantage of open enrollment by visiting multiple public schools near you and discovering which is the best fit for your family. Traditional public schools aren’t all the same: They may differ in learning methods and one may just “feel different” than another to you. 

As of the 2020-2021 school year, more than 78,000 students were enrolled in Vermont’s pre-K-12 public schools. Find out more about public schools in your state at the Vermont Agency of Education. You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking.”

Vermont Charter Schools

Vermont is one of only four states that have not yet passed laws allowing public charter schools. While Vermont families cannot yet choose public charters, this may be an option in the future! 

Charter schools are tuition-free public schools that have extra freedom to innovate and are accountable to authorizing entities for student achievement. Each school has a charter that explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves. That could be providing a Spanish immersion program or offering a rigorous STEAM curriculum. If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system is usually used to determine admittance.

Vermont Magnet Schools

Vermont families can also choose magnet schools. These free public schools allow students to zoom in on a specific learning track, such as engineering or the arts. Magnet schools teach all subjects through the lenses of that specific track. If there is one near you with a theme that interests your child, this could be an exciting and free option to consider. 

Currently, Vermont has at least two magnet schools. Sustainability Academy focuses on social, environmental, and economic justice for communities. Integrated Arts Academy, meanwhile, focuses on music, drama, movement, and visual arts. Both of these magnet choices are in the Burlington School District.

Vermont Private Schools

Vermont families can also choose private schools! These nonpublic schools charge tuition and offer unique learning environments that may be smaller in size, pass on a specific religious tradition, or provide a different curriculum than is available in your district school. 

There are about 130 private schools across the state of Vermont serving about 3,500 students. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $18,494 for elementary schools and $32,155 for high schools.

Students in specific Vermont towns that do not have a public school for their grade are eligible for a tuitioning program. This program funds their attendance at a public or even private school outside their community. 

In 2022, the Supreme Court clarified that faith-based private schools are eligible to participate in this program. Schools that choose to participate in this town tuitioning program cannot deny enrollment to students based on special-education needs. For the 2022-2023 school year, Vermont approved 15 private religious schools for participation in the program. Unfortunately, Vermont’s 2023 state budget includes a ban on adding any more independent schools to the current approved list of participants.

Additional funding may be available from other sources, and the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts. Currently, 4.1% of Vermont K-12 students participate in a private school choice program. Learn more at Private School Review: Vermont.

Vermont Online Learning

Don’t overlook virtual schools just because they are off the beaten track. These programs can offer uniquely flexible learning environments that meet a variety of family needs. Whether your child wants to accelerate learning or needs a quieter environment to focus in, you may be interested in trying virtual school. 

While Vermont does not yet offer a statewide, free, full-time online learning option, some students may be able to take part-time or full-time courses through the Vermont Virtual Learning Cooperative. For the 2023-2024 school year, K-8 students enrolled in a public school can access full-time online learning through the cooperative for free. In other cases, a variety of factors determine whether the school or parent will pay tuition. For more information, contact your local public school.

There are also paid, full-time online options, such as George Washington University Online High SchoolThe Keystone School, Excel High School, and K12 Private Academy, that are available to students in any state.

To read more about online learning in Vermont, check out the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

Vermont Homeschooling

Vermont families can also choose to homeschool, which allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. Homeschooling is the process of parents educating students at home and is permitted in all 50 states. Currently, 3.5% of students in Vermont are homeschooled.

The state requires homeschooling parents to teach specific subjects (including communication skills, history, and the fine arts) and assess their children annually. In light of a new law passed in 2023, homeschool families are no longer required to submit these annual assessments to the Agency of Education. You can read more about this year’s changes to Vermont homeschooling law at the Home School Legal Defense Association

In Vermont, it is required that you provide notice of your intent to homeschool by submitting the Home Study Enrollment Form between March 1 and August 1 annually. As of 2023, you are no longer required to include a minimum course of study in this notification. It is recommended that you formally withdraw your student from their public school so they are not marked truant. 

Note that homeschooled students in Vermont may still be eligible to participate in sports or classes at local public schools.

For more information, you can also check out the Vermont Home Education Network and Home School Legal Defense Association – Vermont.

Vermont Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

Many Vermont families today are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a distinct commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are real examples of microschools and related resources in your state: 

  • Mysa Microschool in Mad River Valley seeks to offer children a learning environment that is kind and cozy, where everyone knows them and they can develop confidence, self-advocacy, agency, and time management proficiency. 

 

  • New World Adventure School in Springfield is a nature-based, inquiry-centered microschool for ages 3-6. The school believes that “children’s social-emotional well-being has ample space to expand in the great outdoors.”

 

  • Vermont Village School is a microschool that “reimagines school as a liberatory space for people of color.” 

 

Remember, microschooling is more a mentality than a specific legal distinction in most cases. Often, a family participates in a microschool while legally homeschooling, or being enrolled in a private or online school. 

Download the School Choice Snapshot for Vermont

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What is School Choice

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Choosing the Right School

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School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels

Microschooling and Mix-and-Match Learning

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Vermont Parents

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Vermont, visit these resources:

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Utah State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

Wondering about school choice in Utah? There are a variety of options available for Utah families. Knowing these options can help you find a learning environment where your child is not just “getting by” at school, but actually thriving and inspired to learn. 

In Utah, families can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Interested in learning more about Utah’s Education Savings Account (ESA) program? Check out our deep dive blog on the Utah Fits All Scholarship Program!

Utah Traditional Public Schools

Many Utah families choose traditional public school for their child. Currently, 82.9% of students are attending a traditional public school in Utah. Traditional public schools are operated by school districts, free to attend, open to all students, and funded by taxpayers. Did you know that, on average, Utah spends $9,095 per public school student each year? You can search your school’s spending and that of nearby schools at Project Nickel.

Utah is one of just a few states with unrestricted open enrollment for public school. What this means is that you can send your child to any public school in Utah, regardless of where you live or where the school is located. For a real-world example of the application process and deadlines, check out Salt Lake City School Districts’ open enrollment guidelines.

In Utah, you cannot be charged tuition for being a transfer student. Generally, parents are responsible for transportation to the public school of their choice or to a stop on the district’s bus route. In some cases, the previously assigned school will provide transportation if they are trying to relieve overcrowding.

You can take advantage of open enrollment by visiting multiple public schools near you and discovering which is the best fit for your family. Traditional public schools aren’t all the same: They may differ in learning methods and one may just “feel different” than another to you. You may want to learn more about public schools at the Utah State Board of Education. You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools Without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking.”

Parents, educators, and community members can find education-related data about public schools (such as student proficiency and student growth rates) at Utah State Board of Education’s Data Gateway.

Utah Charter Schools

Charter schools are tuition-free public schools that have extra freedom to innovate with curriculum and learning methods. Utah has more than 130 charter schools that parents can choose from; check out a map of these charter schools. Currently, 11.1% of K-12 students in Utah attend a public charter school.

Each school has a charter that explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves. For instance, that could be providing a performing arts program or offering a rigorous, literacy-based curriculum. If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system is usually used to determine admittance. Charter schools are held accountable to authorizing bodies for student achievement. 

You can learn more from The Utah Association of Public Charter Schools or the Utah Charter School Conversations podcast. You can also read frequently asked questions about charter schools at the Utah State Board of Education, one of the authorizers for charter schools in your state.

Parents, educators, and community members can find education-related data about public schools (such as student proficiency and student growth rates) at Utah State Board of Education’s Data Gateway.

Utah Magnet Schools

Families can also choose magnet schools; these are free public schools that allow kids to narrow in on a specific learning track, such as engineering or the performing arts. Magnet schools teach all subjects through the lenses of that specific track. If there is one near you with a theme that interests your child, this could be an exciting school choice to consider. Currently, 1.5% of all K-12 students in Utah attend a magnet school. In Utah, the Ogden School District has some magnet programs, such as a gifted and talented program and a space science program. Salt Lake City School District also offers some magnet extended learning programs. Plus, Washington County School District has recently launched a new magnet high school for career and technical education.

Parents, educators, and community members can find education-related data about public schools (such as student proficiency and student growth rates) at Utah State Board of Education’s Data Gateway.

Utah Private Schools

Utah families can also choose private schools. These nonpublic schools charge tuition and offer a unique learning environment that may be smaller in size, pass on a specific religious tradition, or provide a different curriculum than is available in your district school. 

There are about 180 private schools across the state of Utah. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,962 for elementary schools and $13,036 for high schools.

In Utah, there are two state-run scholarship programs to help children with special needs access private school: The Carson Smith Special Needs Scholarship Program and the Special Needs Opportunity Scholarship program.

Also, a new scholarship open to all Utah students has launched for the 2024-2025 school year: the Utah Fits All Scholarship Program. This education savings account program will give $8,000 in flexible education funding to families choosing to enroll in a nonpublic school option, like private school. Besides private school tuition, families may be able to use the funds for other customized learning needs, including tutoring services, educational software, individual classes at a local public school, or dual enrollment at a technical college. Currently, 0.2% of all K-12 students in Utah are participating in a private school choice program.

Learn more at Private School Review: Utah.

Utah Online Learning

Additionally, don’t overlook online learning! It offers a uniquely flexible learning environment that meets a variety of family needs. Whether your child wants to accelerate his or her learning or needs a quieter environment in which to focus, you may be interested in giving virtual school a try. 

All Utah students, grades K-12, can enroll full-time or part-time in online courses through Utah Online School. All courses are tuition-free. Other free online learning options are also available, such as Utah Connections Academy and Utah Virtual Academy. Moreover, Utah’s My Tech High partners with public schools to offer a full-time, personalized, distance education program for students ages 5 to 18.

Mountain Heights Academy is another free online public option for students in grades 7-12. The school is the first secondary school in the country to create and publicly release its own curriculum as an “open educational resource” freely available for anyone’s use. 

Additionally, a number of Utah school districts developed their own online school programs during the pandemic, some of which continue to be options even for out-of-district students

You can also check out Utah’s Statewide Online Education Program, which allows 6th-12th grade students regularly enrolled in public, private, or homeschool to enroll in up to six online course credits per academic year. The program gathers approved online courses to make it easy for families to access courses not available at their regular school. 

More than 24,000 students enrolled in fully online schools in Utah for fall of 2022. Parents, educators, and community members can find education-related data about all public schools, including online public schools, at Utah State Board of Education’s Data Gateway. To read more about online learning in Utah, check out the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

Utah Homeschooling

Utah families can also choose to homeschool, which allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. Homeschooling is the process of parents educating students at home and all 50 states allow it.

In Utah, it is required that you provide a notarized homeschool affidavit prior to starting homeschool. It is also recommended that you formally withdraw your student from their public school so they are not marked truant. 

The state does not define specific subjects that homeschooling parents must teach, and does not require standardized testing for homeschoolers. Note that homeschooled students in Utah may still be eligible to participate in sports, activities, or classes at local public schools.

A new scholarship open to all Utah students, including all homeschoolers, will launch for the 2024-2025 school year: the Utah Fits All Scholarship Program. This education savings account program will give $8,000 in flexible education funding to families choosing to enroll in a nonpublic school option, like homeschool. Besides homeschool curriculum, families may be able to use the funds for other customized learning needs, including tutoring services, educational software, individual classes at a local public school, or dual enrollment at a technical college.

You can learn more at the Utah State Board of Education’s Homeschooling page, the Utah Home Education AssociationHome School Legal Defense Association – Utah, and Utah Christian Home School Association.

Utah Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

Today, some Utah families are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a distinct commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are a few real examples of innovative learning choices and related resources in Utah:

  • CHOICE Learning Center is an Acton Academy affiliate in Bountiful with a focus on learning as a lifelong endeavor. Aim Academy also operates Acton-affiliated campuses in Utah. Acton Academy also has a school located in Cache Valley.

 

  • My Tech High, based out of Utah, offers flexible, student-tailored learning arrangements where students enroll full-time in a public school but learn online, locally in-person, or in a hybrid format.

 

  • Besides offering support for homeschoolers, Homeschool Hub Utah offers a list of hybrid education options for homeschool families wanting to partner with schools for specialized instruction and special education resources. 

 

  • In this Forbes article, Kerry McDonald has shone light on some of the regulatory challenges that microschools in Utah face. 

 

 

Remember, microschooling is more a mentality than a specific legal distinction in most cases. Often, a family participates in a microschool while legally homeschooling, or being enrolled in a private or online school. 

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What is School Choice

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Choosing the Right School

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

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Search for Schools Near Me

School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels

Microschooling and Mix-and-Match Learning

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7 Step Guide

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Texas State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

Wondering about school choice in Texas? There are a variety of options available for Texas families. Knowing these options can help you find a learning environment where your child is not just “getting by” at school, but actually thriving and inspired to learn.

In Texas, families can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Looking for special education options? You can learn what special education services are available in Texas at the Ultimate Guide to Special Education.

Texas Traditional Public Schools

Most Texas families choose traditional public schools, which are operated by school districts, free to attend, open to all students, and funded by taxpayers. Currently, 81.3% of K-12 students attend a traditional public school. Did you know that, on average, Texas spends $11,005 per public school student each year?  

In Texas, the state allows each district decides to set its own open enrollment policies. Open enrollment refers to whether parents can send their children to any public school, regardless of where it is located. Parents wanting to transfer their child to a different public school than the one they are assigned should contact their local school district to see if this is an option. As an example, Socorro Independent School District allows families to switch schools within the district for qualifying reasons, including afterschool care needs or having a sibling at another school. Note that if your child attends a school on the Texas Public Education Grant list of poorly-performing schools, you are automatically allowed to request a transfer. 

Open enrollment is a valuable choice, widening parents’ options and ensuring that their zip code isn’t the sole determiner of their education. Texas’ public schools come in all different flavors. Burbank Middle School, for instance, has a strong dual-language program. And Dallas ISD’s offerings range from International Baccalaureate schools to STEM schools. 

Find out more about public schools in your state at the Texas Education Agency. You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking.”

Texas Charter Schools

Texas has had charter schools as an option for more than 20 years. Like traditional public schools, charter schools are public, free, and typically have no requirements for entry. What distinguishes charter schools is that they have extra freedom to innovate with learning methods and they are accountable to authorizing bodies for results. 

In Texas, 7% of all K-12 students attend a public charter school. Parents can choose from more than 700 charter schools in Texas. Each school has a charter which explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves. That could be providing a STEM program or offering a rigorous, literacy-based curriculum. If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system (like drawing random names out of a hat!)  is usually used to determine admittance. 

You can read more about these charter offerings at the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Public Charter Schools Association.

Texas Magnet Schools

Magnet schools are free public schools that allow kids to narrow in on a specific learning track, such as an International Baccalaureate program or the performing arts. Magnet schools teach all subjects through the lenses of that specific track. If your child learns well through diving deeply into a particular subject, a magnet school could be a good fit. Currently, 3.8% of all K-12 students attend a public magnet school in Texas.

Texas has many magnet schools. For example, Aldine ISD, Dallas ISD, DeSoto ISD, Galveston ISD, Houston ISD, and Richardson ISD all offer magnet choices. These schools have themes ranging from linguistics to applied technology. One of the state’s newest magnet school programs is the Space and Engineering Technologies Academy (SETA), opening in North East ISD in 2023.

You may also be interested in checking out U.S. News & World Report’s ranking of Texas’ magnet high schools. Please note that the list may not be exhaustive and you should check with your local district about options near you.

Texas Private Schools

Private schools, nonpublic schools that charge tuition, offer a unique learning environment that may include a smaller class size, pass on a specific religious tradition, or provide a different curriculum than is available in your district school. 

There are about 2,000 private schools across the state of Texas. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,076 for elementary schools and $11,515 for high schools.

There are no state-run scholarship options in Texas, but private scholarships may be available to help families access private school. Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at ACE Scholarships-Texas, the Texas Catholic School Directory, the Texas Private Schools Association, and Private School Review: Texas.

Texas Online Learning

Don’t overlook online learning! It offers a uniquely flexible learning environment that meets a variety of family needs. Whether your child wants to accelerate his or her learning or needs a quieter environment in which to focus, you may be interested in giving virtual school a try.

Texas offers several free, full-time online learning options for students, including tuition-free online schooling through the Texas Virtual School Network’s Online Schools. For the 2023-2024 school year, full-time online schools to choose from in the Texas Virtual School Network include:  iUniversity Prep, Texas Virtual Academy at Hallsville, Texas Connections Academy at Houston, Texas Online Preparatory School, eSchool Prep, Digital Academy of Texas, and iSchool Virtual Academy of Texas. Meanwhile, TEXAS Virtual Schools offers eSchool Prep and Lone Star Academy as statewide options.

For Texas district and charter schools, state funding has historically been based on the number of students physically present in classrooms, which has made it tough for schools to fund virtual learning. Still, some school districts and charter networks have developed online schools, such as such as Harmony Virtual Academy and South Texas ISD Virtual Academy. In 2021, Texas lawmakers passed a funding bill to help districts cover the costs of virtual learning. According to the law, district and charter schools that received a C or higher in the latest accountability ratings can receive funding for students enrolled in full-time remote learning in their boundaries. In some cases, district online options may be available to out-of-district students through open enrollment.

Students can also choose part-time options through the Texas Virtual School Network.

To read more about online learning in Texas, check out the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

Texas Homeschooling

Texas families can also choose to homeschool, which allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. Homeschooling is the process of parents educating students at home and all 50 states allow it. The Texas Homeschool Coalition estimates that more than 750,000 students in the state are homeschooled.

The state requires homeschooling parents to teach certain subjects (including math, spelling, and good citizenship), but does not require homeschoolers to take standardized tests. In some cases, homeschooled students may still be eligible to participate in sports or activities at local public schools.

In Texas, it is not required that you provide notice of your intent to homeschool; however, it is recommended that you formally withdraw from your public school so your student is not marked truant. In the case that you decide to return to public school, contact your local school to find out their placement process.

You may also want to check out the Texas Education Agency’s Homeschooling page, the Texas Homeschool Coalition, the Home School Legal Defense Association – Texas, and the  Arlington Association of Home Educators.

Texas Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

Today, many Texas families are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a distinct commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are real examples of microschools and related resources in Texas:

 

 

 

 

  • Dallas Hybrid Preparatory is a district-run, hybrid learning arrangement that allows students in grades 4-6 to learn at a “small, boutique campus” two days a week, and at home three three days a week.

 

  • Leading Little Arrows is a hybrid school and multi-cultural co-op located in Arlington that embraces and celebrates students’ diverse cultural backgrounds.

 

  • Spyrja Academy offers a blended learning environment for homeschoolers and students enrolled in online schools, with a focus on innovative instruction and community engagement for high school students.

 

  • Safari Small Schools is an innovative microschool that specializes in serving children with behavioral challenges.

 

  • Great Hearts Online, a classical virtual academy, is piloting classical learning microschools in Texas for families enrolled in their online program.

 

  • Veritas Academy is a “collaborative” hybrid school that focuses on family leadership and togetherness in learning.

 

 

  • In an effort to keep learning pods a flexible choice for families, Texas legislators passed a bill in 2021 to protect learning pods from burdensome government regulations.

 

 

Remember, microschooling is more a mentality than a specific legal distinction in most cases. Often, a family participates in a microschool while legally homeschooling, or being enrolled in a private or online school. 

Download the School Choice Snapshot for Texas

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What is School Choice

How can it empower parents and help kids achieve their dreams?

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Choosing the Right School

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

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Search for Schools Near Me

School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels

Microschooling and Mix-and-Match Learning

How can it empower parents and help kids achieve their dreams?

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7 Step Guide

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

View Guide

Education Resources for
Texas Parents

For additional information about school choices in Texas, visit these resources:

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Tennessee State Guide

Choosing a school? You’ve got options.

Each spring, parents face one of the biggest decisions they can make for their child’s future: What school environment will their child spend about 1,000 hours in next year? 

Making that decision with confidence starts with knowing what options you have; you may have more school choices in Tennessee than you realize! Understanding these options can help you find a school where your child grows and learns to the best of their ability. Tennessee families can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning.

Interested in learning more about Tennessee’s Education Savings Account (ESA) program? Check out our deep dive blog to guide you through it!

Tennessee Traditional Public Schools

Most Tennessee families choose traditional public schools, which are operated by school districts, free to attend, open to all students, and funded by taxpayers. Did you know that, on average, Tennessee spends $10,507 per public school student each year? 

Tennessee has more than 1,700 public schools. Currently, 78% of all K-12 students attend a traditional public school in Tennessee. Since fall 2022, all school districts in Tennessee have offered an open enrollment period. Open enrollment refers to whether parents can send their children to any public school, regardless of where it is located. Tennessee’s expanding open enrollment options mean that parents may be able to transfer their child to any public school, regardless of where they live. However, note that in some cases, receiving districts in Tennessee charge fees for out-of-district students. 

Open enrollment is an important way that parents have access to a broader variety of public schools. Find out more about public schools in your state at the Tennessee Department of Education or the online dashboard of the Tennessee Comptroller’s Office. You can also learn more about open enrollment at “Public Schools without Boundaries: A 50-State Ranking.”

Tennessee Charter Schools

Tennessee has more than 110 public charter schools, many of them in Memphis and Nashville. In Tennessee, 4% of all K-12 students attend a public charter school. Like traditional public schools, charter schools are public, free, and typically have no requirements for entry. What distinguishes charter schools is that they have extra freedom to innovate with learning methods and are accountable to authorizing entities for student results. 

Each school has a charter which explains the school’s purpose and what specific community need it serves, whether that be providing a language immersion program or offering a rigorous, literacy-based curriculum. If there are more families seeking admittance to a charter school than there are seats, a lottery system (like drawing random names out of a hat!) is usually used to determine admittance. 

Tennessee’s first charter school, Memphis Academy of Science and Engineering, was founded in 2003. Today, Tennessee’s charter schools serve more than 38,000 children. You can learn more about your state’s charter options at the TN Charter School Center.

Tennessee Magnet Schools

You can also choose magnet schools! In Tennessee, 7.2% of all K-12 students attend a public magnet school. Magnet schools are free public schools that allow kids to narrow in on a specific learning track, such as an International Baccalaureate program or the performing arts. A magnet school teaches all subjects through the lenses of that specific track. Tennessee has several magnet schools. For example, the Hamilton County School District, Knox County School District, Metropolitan Nashville Public School District, Rutherford County School District, and Shelby County School District all offer magnet choices, among others. If your child learns well through diving deeply into a particular subject, a magnet school could be a good fit. 

Tennessee Private Schools

Tennessee families can also choose private schools. These nonpublic schools charge tuition and offer a unique learning environment that may be smaller in size, pass on a specific religious tradition, or provide a different curriculum than is available in your district school. 

There are more than 550 private schools across the state of Tennessee. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,444 for elementary schools and $11,086 for high schools.

Some tuition assistance is available. In Tennessee, students with special needs may be eligible for a publicly funded Individualized Education Account. In 2022, this program was expanded to include students with dyslexia. Also, low-income and middle-income students zoned to attend a Shelby County District school, Hamilton County or Metro Nashville Public School may qualify for a state-funded education savings account to attend a private school of their choice. Families can find an enrollment form and more details at the Tennessee Department of Education. Additional funding may be available from other sources. Currently, 0.2% of all K-12 students in Tennessee participate in a private school choice program.

Learn more at Private School Review: Tennessee. You can also find information about private schools at the online dashboard of the Tennessee Comptroller’s Office.

Tennessee Online Learning

Don’t overlook virtual learning, which offers a uniquely flexible learning environment that meets a variety of family needs. Whether your child wants to accelerate learning or needs a quieter, stress-free environment in which to focus, you may be interested in trying online school.

Virtual schools in Tennessee are overseen by school districts. While some virtual schools may be open only to in-district students, others (like Tennessee Virtual Academy and Tennessee Connections Academy) serve students statewide.

As of 2024, Tennessee has more than 50 virtual schools! Schools that are approved to serve all grades K-12 statewide include Bradley County Virtual School (currently serving grades 3-12), Greene Online Academy of Learning (currently serving grades 6-12), Maryville Virtual School (currently serving grades 2-12), Memphis Virtual School (currently serving grades 4-12), Putnam County VITAL (currently serving grades 3-12), the iLearn Institute at Lenoir City, Tennessee Online Public SchoolHawkins County Virtual AcademyPioneer Virtual Academy, and Roane County Virtual Academy.

You can find a complete list of Tennessee’s virtual schools, both those that enroll statewide and those designed for local students, at the Tennessee Department of Education. More than 10,000 students in Tennessee used a fully online schooling option in 2020-2021!

To read more about online learning in Tennessee, check out the Digital Learning Collaborative’s state profile.

Tennessee Homeschooling

Families can also choose to homeschool. This option allows for high levels of customized learning and flexibility. All 50 states allow homeschooling, the process of parents educating students at home.

In Tennessee, 1.5% of all K-12 students are homeschooled. If you are an independent homeschool, it is required that you provide notice of intent to homeschool before the school year or upon choosing to homeschool and annually thereafter. Formally withdrawing from public school is required in some districts and recommended for all districts. If you decide to return to public school, your school will assess to determine grade level placement.

While the state doesn’t lay out specific subjects that homeschooling families must teach, it does require that homeschooling students take standardized tests in some grades. Note that homeschooled students in Tennessee may still be eligible to participate in sports or activities at local public schools.

Tennessee offers funding assistance for students with special needs through the Special Needs Individualized Education Account Program.

You can learn more at the Tennessee Department of Education’s Homeschooling page, Home School Legal Defense Association – Tennessee, and the Tennessee Home Education Association.

Tennessee Microschools and Mix-and-Match Learning

K-12 education is changing rapidly. Today, many Tennessee families are mixing and matching school options to come up with new ways to personalize education. Microschools are one of these ways. A microschool refers to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms. What microschools share in common is a distinct commitment to small-group learning, close-knit relationships, and an emphasis on children as individual learners.

Here are just a few real examples of microschools in Tennessee: 

  • The Lab School is an innovative microschool located in the heart of Memphis that serves children ages 5-11.

 

  • Discovery Learners’ Academy is a nontraditional microschool in Chattanooga offering personalized academics, social emotional coaching, and discovery-based science and social studies.

 

  • Imani Montessori is a microschool and homeschool umbrella in East Nashville that seeks to cultivate free thinkers, creative, compassionate, and committed global citizens in service to humanity.

 

Remember, microschooling is more a mentality than a specific legal distinction in most cases. Often, a family participates in a microschool while legally homeschooling, or being enrolled in a private or online school. 

Download the School Choice Snapshot for Tennessee

Download Snapshot

What is School Choice

How can it empower parents and help kids achieve their dreams?

Read More

Choosing the Right School

Tips to help you find a school where your daughter or son will learn, succeed, and be happy.

Get Tips

Search for Schools Near Me

School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels