Tag: National School Choice Week

Telling Your School’s Story during National School Choice Week

Every year, hundreds of journalists call and email us wanting to do a story about how NSCW is celebrated near them.

That’s where you come in!

Reporters want to talk to you, the community leaders and local voices that bring the message of School Choice Week to their readers, watchers, or listeners.

Participating in the All Star program means that you’re on our shortlist of schools celebrating National School Choice Week for reporters who are covering the Week.

Usually, we’re talking to the same reporter to give them all the details they need to know about the Week at-large, and how school choice is changing on the state and national level. Their questions for you will center around your plans during the Week, and how families choose your school.

You can always reach our team at pressoffice@schoolchoiceweek.com if you have questions, or need assistance, along the way.

In the meantime, here’s some information you may find useful!

NATIONAL SCHOOL CHOICE WEEK 2024

  • National School Choice Week will take place January 21-27, 2024.
  • This is the fourteenth annual National School Choice Week
  • More than 26,000 schools and homeschool groups are celebrating National School Choice Week 2024. You can find state celebrations using the map on our participant homepage.
  • In addition to tens of thousands of events taking place at local schools, activities include school fairs, movie nights, capitol rallies, field trips, parades, talent shows, and more. Across the country, dozens of iconic state landmarks will light up in School Choice Week’s official colors, red and yellow. You can find out more in our guide to NSCW 2024.

ABOUT SCHOOL CHOICE

  • School choice means giving parents access to the best K-12 education options for their children. These options include traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschooling and mix-and-match learning. National School Choice Week is an annual effort that helps parents raise awareness of these options.
  • School choice is important because every child deserves an effective, challenging, and motivating education that inspires them to be successful and achieve their dreams. However, children learn in different ways and have different talents, skills, and challenges. What might be a good school for one student might not be a good fit for another child. School choice allows parents to identify the best learning environments for their individual children.
  • You can find out more about what’s changed, and what’s possible, in individual states by checking out our trends roundup or state roadmaps.

ABOUT THE MISSION

  • National School Choice Week is organized by the National School Choice Awareness Foundation, a 501c3 nonprofit.
  • The goal of the Week is to raise public awareness about the school choice options available to families, including traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online learning, homeschooling, and microschools.
  • The week is nonpartisan and nonpolitical and does not advocate for any legislation.
  • You can find out more about the Week across our website.

TIPS AND TRICKS

  • It’s a good idea to have a clear idea of families who can talk about why they’ve chosen your school, so you can connect them with a reporter if they decide to feature your celebration.
  • TV coverage is a great boost for any school. Sometimes, all it takes is emailing a news tip to a local news station (you can find this email on their website) letting them know that you’re planning an event as part of a national awareness week.
  • More parents look up school choice information during January than at any other time of the year. Plan to post about the idea on your school’s social media using the term “school choice” as a keyword.
  • If you are interviewed by a journalist about you celebration, think of your comments as part of a larger story they’re trying to tell. They’ll likely summarize the key features of your school for you, then use a quote for you that captures the feel of the event or the reason you celebrate. Your quotes are more likely to get used if they capture the heart of the story, rather than details about your school.

GREAT SCHOOL STORIES (Get inspired!)

  • Sometimes, TV stations will simply share event details with their viewers.
  • Othertimes, they’ll send a TV crew to give your school the star treatment.
  • Occasionally, they’ll focus on students and their dreams.
  • Or they may focus on a unique feature of the school, and how it helps students.

How We Celebrated: Spirit Week

Your school or homeschool group rocks, and National School Choice Week is the perfect time to celebrate what makes you unique! Planning a spirit week gives your community so much to look forward to.

A spirit week is a great way to celebrate all the reasons your school is a great education option. During your spirit week you can decorate your school, invite community leaders and prospective families to learn more, show your pride with a pep rally, give back with a service project…. the possibilities are endless!

One of the most popular spirit week activities is to have a pep rally featuring the National School Choice Week dance! We love to see energy and excitement as students come together to dance along with each other. For more information about hosting a pep rally, check out our “How We Celebrated: Pep Rally” post.

Get inspired by seeing how Epic Charter Schools and Pennsylvania Leadership Charter School took their celebration online with a digital spirit week! Each day had a different theme and they had their students & families share photos of the theme to their favorite social media channel.

Schools around the country – like the West Charleston Enrichment Academy, Rocky Mountain Prep, and Burbank Middle School decorated their school with signs and placards filled out by students – sharing what makes their school a great #schoolchoice.

As part of the spirit week at Calvary Chapel Rialto Christian School the staff held a pizza party – complete with an obstacle course for the students to race through!

Bankbridge Elementary combined their School Choice Spirit Week with their Great Kindness Challenge – each day of the week had a different theme related to spreading kindness.

Students at Advance U in Phoenix, AZ had a whole week of scheduled activities – including Jersey Day and Yellow Day!

The bottom line is this: hosting a spirit week helps you celebrate all week long! It can be as simple as themed days & social media posts, or as in-depth as pep rallies and open houses. No matter how you decide to show your spirit, it will create excitement and enthusiasm in your school community.

How will you celebrate?

If you’re interested in planning a spirit week or another special event this January, reach out to Mackenzie Mate at mackenzie@schoolchoiceweek.com.

For more celebration ideas, explore our Event Ideas and How-To Guides.

Our How We Celebrated series gives you insider glimpses into how a few of the thousands of NSCW participants have chosen to celebrate their schools. 

Guide to School Options for Native American, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native Families

Created in cooperation with the National Indian Education Association

There are nearly one million Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students enrolled in K-12 U.S. educational programs.  It is estimated that up to 90% of these students are enrolled in some part of the public school system.  Many Native American and Alaska Native students are citizens of one of the 574 federally recognized tribes, villages, and pueblos and 64 state recognized tribes. Each of these Nations has their own unique culture, language, and value system, which are predicated on beliefs, history, and a unique knowledge-base. For the purposes of this guide, we will refer to this group as Natives. Native families face outsized barriers and impositions in education. The challenges, decisions, and opportunities in education for Native people are often complex. 

As parents and caretakers of Native students, choosing the education that best fits the needs of your student and family is important. There are many things to consider, and the purpose of this guide is to provide information that will help with important decisions you face when trying to provide your child a connected, enriching, and meaningful education. 

Together with the National Indian Education Association (NIEA), we’ve put together a state-specific look at how Native students and families can find the educational opportunities available to them. If you are a parent or student choosing a school and your Native heritage is top-of-mind in making your choice, this guide is for you.

A Unique Educational Context:

About 56 million acres in the United States are preserved as tribal lands. Today, a little less than half of Native families live on these reservations, the largest of which is the 16 million-acre Navajo Nation Reservation that spans parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. While all Native students are full citizens of the United States with the same rights as other citizens, they may also have special rights, such as hunting and fishing rights, access to sacred sites, or other unique dispensations reflecting the relationship between Native people and land.

The history of U.S. education policy toward Native students is fraught with broken promises, forced assimilation, and mistreatment. These wrongs were particularly severe in the Indian boarding schools, which the National Indian Education Association describes as:

“…Often overcrowded, hostile, and propagat[ing] the emotional, physical, sexual, and mental abuse of Native children. The forcible removal of children from families into these schools was a deliberate process. By keeping children from their parents and their traditional culture, a division was created between the ‘old’ and ‘new’ worlds. Many times, when children returned to their families, they were no longer able to communicate in their Native languages, but families that refused to send their children to these schools were often penalized with jail time or the withholding of government rations.”

These past wrongs are the root cause of disassociation from and disconnection to education in Native American communities, families, and tribes. It has been widely documented that Native youth today face unique challenges both at home and at school. These include a higher youth suicide rate, a higher likelihood to experience violent crimes, a higher likelihood to be designated with a disability, and a lower likelihood of access to Advanced Placement and college prep courses in high school. While these challenges to educational opportunity for Native students were strikingly documented in the 1969 Senate report, “Indian Education: A National Tragedy–A National Challenge,” many persist even today, more than 50 years after the report. 

Over the last few decades, both state governments and the federal government have passed laws to improve learning opportunities for Native families. In 2006, for example, the Native American Languages Preservation Act became the first federal act to recognize Native communities’ right to speak their native language. This law provided grants for immersion schools and language restoration efforts. In 2015, the Every Student Succeeds Act passed, which authorized funding for Native language immersion programs, and required state education agencies to consult with tribes. 

“Tribes were not waiting on the shores of the Atlantic for Columbus to bring us education. We have always had our own means to provide instruction and education to our tribes.”

Quinton Roman Nose

More from Quinton Roman Nose 

More progress remains to be made. In 2019, the National Indian Education Study was conducted in partnership with the National Assessment of Educational Progress. The results point to the ongoing need for educational opportunities that better meet the unique needs of each Native family and child.

Unique Considerations for Native Parents and Guardians

Whether a Native family lives on a rural reservation or in a busy city, their indigeneity places them in a unique context in American society. A student’s identity and educational experience will always be shaped in some way by this. So, what are some things Native parents or guardians should consider in selecting a learning environment?

  1. Identity: will this school advocate and support the individual learning needs for your student?
  2. Culture and language: does the school have and support the connection and integration of culture and language into your child’s learning?
  3. Community-based: does the school provide opportunities for students to learn through community-based connections and opportunities?
  4. Academics: does the school offer learning and teaching opportunities that honor student equality and equity? 

Native American Students and School Choices:

So, what ARE your school options as a Native family? Across America, these are the main types of schools: traditional public-schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, federally funded Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) schools, tribally controlled schools, private schools, online schools, homeschooling, and microschooling. Choosing any of these options is considered exercising school choice.

For many Native families, another important form of choice in education is tribal choice. Tribal choice is the ability of a particular tribe to self-determine and create a learning opportunity that is derived from and reflects the tribal community. The tribal choice is collectively determined by tribes, tribal leadership, and tribal stakeholders. Although tribal choice is creating a learning environment that best fits “their” particular community, parents and guardians must decide what works best for their student. 

Even if there is not a tribal choice school near you, keep in mind that some tribes have education departments that support tribal members with language immersion programs, career training, and other learning opportunities outside of the traditional classroom format. There is a legacy of educational sovereignty being used to form survival schools that place Indigenous culture at the center of learning. 

Traditional public schools, including public schools on reservations: 

Just as the vast majority of students in America attend public schools, the vast majority of Native students attend traditional public schools. Many Native students live in rural areas, with fewer private and charter school options located nearby. A 2019 study found that about 60% of Native students surveyed attended public schools where less than 25% of all students in the school were Native.

Bureau of Indian Education Funded and Operated Schools:

While most public schools are run by school districts, about 8 to 9% of Native students attend schools run by the government’s Bureau of Indian Education (BIE),  an agency, within the Department of Interior, that was established to provide educational services per the federal government’s trust responsibilities for Native students. It currently funds and operates 55 elementary and secondary schools, which can be searched on the Bureau’s website

BIE funded, tribally-controlled schools

While some BIE schools are directly operated by the BIE – these are referred to as Bureau Operated Schools – the majority of BIE-funded schools today are controlled by tribes. These schools are divided into two types: “638 schools” in reference to Public Law 93-638 where school services such as transportation, operations, and administration are contracted and schools under Public Law 100-297 which are fully tribally controlled schools. Many of these schools offer curriculum and instruction specially designed to pass on Native culture and values. One parent at a tribally-run public school described that her sons, “get to go outside and practice archery. They get to tan the hides that they make, make drums, work directly in the garden and be present.” 

A few of these BIE schools are boarding schools, which offer a unique opportunity to learn. While most Indian boarding schools closed by the early 1990s, a few remain, such as Santa Fe Indian School, run by the 19 pueblos in New Mexico, which provides an option for students to engage with Native students from other communities to learn and share with one another. 

You can read about transfer options for public schools near you in the Guide to Open Enrollment. 

Public charter schools:

Like traditional public schools, charter schools are public, free, and usually have no requirements for entry. What distinguishes charter schools is that they have extra freedom to innovate with learning methods. Many have a specific curricular focus, which may include Native American culture and language. Charters are accountable to authorizing entities for results. 

As of 2017, there are 64 charter schools that either operate on tribal lands or, even if they are not on tribal lands, serve a significant proportion of Native students. In total, these charter schools serve nearly 10,000 students.

Most of these charter schools are independent, not part of a large charter network. These stand-alone charter schools may be authorized by independent charter boards, local education agencies, state education agencies, or even a college or university. These policies vary state-to-state, and details can be found in the Ultimate Guide to Public Charter Schools

Some of these charter schools have specific missions to preserve Native American culture and language. For instance, the Native American Community Academy in New Mexico, which is a charter school authorized by Albuquerque Public Schools, teaches students Lakota, Navajo, Tiwa, Keres, and Zuni languages, Indigenous art, Native literature, and Indigenous history.  It also provides a community-based education model that connects students to their tribal communities and identities.

Charter schools are a valuable free option for Native students in some regions, and more charter schools may be on the horizon for families. 

“For decades, tribes and Native communities have been striving to create school systems that are reflective of the tribal community’s needs, enable tribes to own responsibility for the development of their students, and empower communities to educate their students consistent with their values. As a result, we welcome the renewed discussion of choice in education and look forward to engaging to make sure that tribes and Native communities and leaders have full authority to lead choice as it plays out for Native students.”

National Indian Education Association

For a more in-depth framework about the expansion of Native charter schools in the United States, see the National Indian Education Association’sSovereignty in Education: Creating Culturally-Based Charter Schools in Native Communities” handbook and Capacity-Building Guide for Founding Native American Charter Schools, a publication by the National Indian Education Association and the National Charter School Resource Center.

Public magnet schools:

Magnet schools are public schools operated by school districts (or groups of school districts) that allow kids to focus on a specific learning track, such as STEM, medical science, or performing arts. 

There are a few magnet schools dispersed throughout America specifically geared toward providing an American Indian perspective and immersing students in Indigenous culture. These include the American Indian Magnet School in Minnesota and PS 19 Native American Magnet School in New York.

Though both magnet schools, charter schools, and district schools are all public schools, parents should note that magnet schools are directly run and controlled by the school district whereas and charter schools have their own oversight structures and varying degrees of autonomy from district control.

Online schools:

Online schools hold the potential to open doors wide for students living on rural reservations, or just in remote areas off reservations. Full-time online schools are available in 35 states. You can read more about online schools near you in the Ultimate Guide to Online School.

Unfortunately, statistics are not readily available for the number of Native American students who currently use online schools, but the number of students overall using online school has surged since pre-COVID. 

Private schools:

Private schools are nonpublic schools that charge tuition. Private schools may offer families a unique curriculum, smaller class sizes, or a faith-based tradition.

As of 2018, just .03% of students at private schools of the National Association of Independent Schools were Native American. While only a small number of Native students currently attend private schools, more opportunities are developing. For example, Santa Fe, New Mexico has opened the first independent school for Native American girls, the Pine Ridge Girls’ School, grounded in Lakota philosophy and practice. 

“Today, some Native American tribes manage private schools that teach their children their tribal culture and language. Some proficiently own and operate large and small businesses that benefit the tribe. Many manage natural resources in a way that protects the environment and economically supports the tribe. Several states have passed laws that require or encourage public schools to teach Native American content in all subject areas. Montana specifically has “Indian Education for All” in the state constitution as a result of young Native American high school students who stood up to the state legislature. Native American music, dance, art, ceremonies, and stories continue to grace the lives of the people who originated on this land. Yes, we face challenges, but we also persevere.” 

Jennifer Jilot, Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana

Many private schools that are not necessarily Native-run and focused but have opened up increased opportunities for Native students to attend. Schools such as the Indian Community School in Wisconsin are accessible and inclusive.

Homeschooling:

As with online learning, there has been a rise in homeschooling across all demographics since the COVID-19 pandemic. Homeschooling is the process of parents educating children in the home, and many families choose to collaborate via tutorials, co-operatives, and extracurricular leagues to enhance the home education experience.

For Native families, there is also a level of exercising sovereignty at play in making the decision to center Indigenous teaching and learning in the home. Native American knowledge, pre- and post-European contact, was held, engaged, and passed in the community and tribally-based ways that may not be included in traditional schools. Homeschooling may be the choice for parents who want to ensure their kids are immersed in culture and, recognizing that they are the best teachers for their children, will opt to practice that sovereign right. 

There is not currently a national Native homeschool group, but there are Facebook groups that share information and tips, such as Indigenous Homeschoolers. Some members of this group express that they homeschool to be able to share Native American history and culture more completely with their child than is possible through traditional schooling. 

Microschools:

Some Native families have found a home in microschooling. Microschools or learning pods refer to students gathering together in a small group – with adult supervision – to learn, explore, and socialize. Microschools can take a variety of shapes and legal forms, from homeschoolers coming together at an enrichment center to a private school committed to small classrooms.

In San Carlos, Arizona, a private, Prenda-style microschool became the first microschool on tribal land. “Microschools are so small and mobile they are easy to bring to children in rural areas and communities like ours,” described Dassa John, a parent and member of the San Carlos Apache Tribal community.

At the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe’s reservation in Washington during the pandemic, a learning pod developed to provide support for students using online learning. Besides working on traditional schooling, students participating in the pod had the chance to practice the Klallam language each day with one of the tribe’s language instructors. 

If you are interested in starting a microschool or learning more, head over to the 50-State Guide to Microschooling and Mix-and-Match Learning.

Native American Education Laws and Resources Near You:

Currently, there are 35 states with federally recognized tribal nations, plus an additional 11 states with state-recognized tribes. The states with the highest populations of Native American students include Alaska, Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, North Dakota, and Montana, though Native people once inhabited all 50 states in the U.S. Through forced removal and genocidal practices, Native Nations and tribes no longer exist in many states, and have been relocated to states in which they did not originally reside. 

Some states, especially those serving the largest populations of Native students, have developed unique curricula, laws, or programs to respond to the needs of Native students. Keep in mind that statistical information may not fully reflect students that identify as Native American because of blood quantum and membership policies, as well as data collection/census means. 

Find a sampling of laws and resources in your state below: 

Click on your state:

AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY DC

Alabama:

Alabama’s Calcedeaver Elementary School in Mobile County is one of the only schools in the state serving a majority of Native students. There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

Starting in 2024, eligible Native students may be eligible for the state’s new Alabama’s Tax-Credit Education Savings Account (ESA) program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private or online school expenses, tutoring, or educational therapy.

As of 2022, there are more than 6,000 Native students in Alabama making up just under 1% of the public school population, with a heavy concentration in Madison County. The 1838 Forced Removal Act drove many Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Choctaw people out of the state. 

Alaska:

Alaska has a Native American Education Program that supports supplemental education programs to benefit Alaska Natives. 

Alaska also has a number of programs and even a few immersion schools allowing students to learn native Alaskan languages. For example, College Gate Elementary in the Anchorage school district offers a Yupik Immersion Program. Meanwhile, Qarġi Academy is the only tribal school on Alaska’s North Slope. And, the Knik Cultural Charter School opened in Wasilla last school year to provide flexible, indigenous education for all grades K-12. There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

In 1994, the state passed the Alaska Native Educational Equity, Support, and Assistance Act, recognizing the unique educational needs of Native families and providing for new programs and enrichment. A bill signed into law in 2022 established a pilot program for five tribes to open new independent schools, with their own curriculum and schedule, over the next few years. According to the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development, “These State Tribal Education Compact Schools (STECs) would be public schools open to all students and would offer a unique, culturally rich combination of Western and millennia-old tribal educational models.”

As of 2022, there are more than 28,000 Native students enrolled in public schools in Alaska, making up about 22% of the public school population.

Arizona:

Arizona has an Indian Education Association that researches and provides resources for Native students, as well as an Office of Indian Education at the Arizona Department of Education. Arizona schools are required to teach about the history of Native communities in the state. 

The Grand Canyon State has a robust array of options for Native students. There are more than 50 Bureau of Indian Education-operated schools and tribally-controlled schools. For example, one of the Bureau of Indian Education schools is Salt River Elementary, which blends learning and the O’Odham and Piipaash cultures. Meanwhile, Akimel O’Otham Pee Posh Charter School on the Gila River Indian Community was recently awarded more than $500,000 to support reading and mitigate the impact of the pandemics for students and their families. 

Arizona also has magnet schools, including Puente de Hózhó (PdH) Public Magnet School, a magnet school in Flagstaff with a Navajo Immersion Language Program. And, the state even has a private Catholic school aimed at preserving Native American culture, St. Charles Apache Mission School in San Carlos.

In Arizona, students who live on a Native reservation are eligible for the state’s Empowerment Scholarships Account (ESA) program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private or online school expenses, tutoring, or educational therapy. Currently, more than 100 families on the San Carlos reservation lands use ESAs each year.

As of 2022, there are more than 47,000 Native students enrolled in public schools in Arizona, making up about 4% of the public school population.

Arkansas:

Arkansas’ American Indian Center is a non-profit that works on improving the quality of life for Native Americans in Arkansas, including Native students.

Some Native students are eligible for the state’s new Educational Freedom Account (EFA) program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

As of 2022, there are more than 2,900 Native students enrolled in public schools in Arkansas, making up close to 1% of the public school population. There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

California:

California’s initiatives to promote Native education include California Indian Education for All, a nonprofit that aims to help schools improve their teaching and resources surrounding Native history and culture. Additionally, the California Indian Education Act, signed in 2022, encourages school districts to increase collaboration with local Native tribes.

California has a few schools that predominantly serve Native American students. These include Sherman Indian High School, an off-reservation boarding high school in Riverside, All Tribes American Indian Charter School in Valley Center, Barona Indian Charter School in Lakeside, and Anahuacalmecac International University Preparatory in Los Angeles.

As of 2022, there are more than 23,000 Native students enrolled in public schools in California, making up close to 1% of the public school population. For more information, families can also explore the –California Department of Education’s list of American Indian Education Centers.

Colorado:

You can read about Colorado’s resources for Native education at the Colorado Department of Education page. 

Unfortunately, one of Colorado’s schools with a unique focus on teaching Indigenous culture and values, the American Indian Academy of Denver, recently closed. However, Ute Mountain Ute Tribe offers education options for their students, as does the South Ute Indian Montessori Academy

Additionally, Native American Culture and Education (NACE), a program of the Denver Public Schools District, connects and supports about 1,000 Native students in the Denver area. Similarly, Jefferson County School District has an Indian Education program offering mentoring, after-school programming, and cultural support.

Families should also know that, as of 2023, Native students are guaranteed the right to wear their traditional regalia at school graduation ceremonies.

As of 2022, there are more than 5,200 Native students enrolled in public schools in Colorado, making up close to 1% of the public school population. There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

Connecticut:

Connecticut‘s tribal nations and education officials are currently partnering to develop a Native American studies curriculum, which will be offered in public schools starting in the 2023-2024 school year.

The Mohegan Tribe also offers free Native American study resources and tools (printable study guides, worksheets and video assets available) for educators and homeschoolers.

As of 2022, there are more than 1,500 Native students in Connecticut making up close to 1% of the public-school population. There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

Delaware:

The Nanticoke Indian Center in Delaware is the historic site of a former tribal school. Today, there are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

As of 2022, there are more than 560 Native students enrolled in public schools in Delaware, making up just under 1% of the public school population.

Florida:

Florida requires that Native education be taught in schools. The state has at least a few tribally-run schools, such as Ahfachkee School in Clewiston and Miccosukee Indian School in Miami.

The Florida Governor’s Council on Indian Affairs, Inc. provides two-week educational programs for Native youth. Also, the Florida Department of Education has launched student contests for Native American Heritage Month.

As of 2022, there are more than 5,700 Native students enrolled in public schools in Florida, making up just under 1% of the public school population.

All Native students are eligible to apply for Florida’s expanded Education Savings Account (ESA) program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition or homeschooling.

Georgia:

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

Some Native students may be eligible for the state’s new Promise Scholarship program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

As of 2022, there are more than 3,500 Native students enrolled in public schools in Georgia, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Hawaii:

Hawaii has a Native Hawaiian Education program to develop and support educational options for Native Hawaiian students. The state has several Hawaiian language immersion schools, including Ānuenue in Honolulu, King Kekaulike High in Pukalani, and Molokai Middle School. Some of the state’s immersion schools are charter schools. A complete list can be found at Hawaii’s Department of Education.

Kamehameha schools have a unique history as a privately-funded school system for furthering culture and academics for Native Hawaiian students.  

You can also read about the Native Hawaiian Education Act at the Native Hawaiian Education Council. This bill officially authorized increased support for the needs of Native Hawaiian students and increased participation from Native communities in planning educational programming.

You may also wish to check out the Native Hawaiian Education Association, a nonprofit that works to support Native Hawaiian educators and learning.

As of 2022, there are more than 43,000 Native students enrolled in public schools in Hawaii, making up well over 25% of the public school population.

Idaho:

Idaho has a couple of tribally-run schools, such as Coeur d’Alene Tribal School in DeSmet. In 2022, this school was the spot of an official announcement by federal education representatives of a $1 million federal grant to promote Native American languages across the country. Another tribally-run school in Idaho is Shoshone Bannock School District #537 in Pocatello. Additionally, the state’s first Native language immersion school is a charter school, Chief Tahgee Elementary Academy on the Fort Hall reservation.

The state’s Indian Education Department works with local tribes to support the learning of Native students. 

In some Idaho districts, such as the Blackfoot School District, Native students have been particularly impacted by learning loss and the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The school district is working on a recovery program, which has involved tutoring programs for tribal students and credit recovery programs. 

As of 2023, there are more than 3,100 Native students enrolled in public schools in Idaho, making up more than 1% of the public school population. There are currently 56 Native teachers, making up just 0.3% of all teachers, in Idaho public schools.

Illinois

Illinois does not have any Bureau of Indian Education schools. But, in the Chicago Public Schools District, Native families can receive support through the American Indian Education Program and the American Indian Family Resource Center. Services include after-school tutoring and cultural programs for students, as well as workshops for parents.

A recent bill passed by state legislators and expected to be signed into law requires Illinois public schools to teach Midwestern Native American history beginning in 2024. The new curriculum would be developed in partnership with the Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative.

As of 2022, there are more than 3,700 Native students enrolled in public schools in Illinois, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Indiana:

In Indiana, the Native American Indian Affairs Commission makes recommendations to government agencies about issues impacting Native families, including education. You may also wish to check out the American Indian Center of Indiana.

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

As of 2022, there are more than 2,000 Native students enrolled in public schools in Indiana, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Native families interested in choosing private school may wish to learn about Indiana’s recently expanded private school scholarship programs.

Iowa:

Iowa has at least one tribally-run school, Meskwaki Settlement School. It is run by the Sac and Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa, the only federally recognized Indian tribe in the state. 

As of 2022, there are more than 1,500 Native students enrolled in public schools in Iowa, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Some Native students are eligible for the state’s new Educational Scholarship Account (ESA) program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

Kansas:

Kansas has at least one tribally-controlled school serving Native students: the Kickapoo Nation School in Powhattan.

Kansas also has a statewide organization, the Kansas Association for Native American Education, that advocates for Native students. 

As of 2022, there are more than 3,400 Native students enrolled in public schools in Kansas, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Kentucky:

Kentucky’s Heritage Council offers educational resources for teachers and families about Native history and culture.

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

As of 2022, there are more than 660 Native students enrolled in public schools in Kentucky, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Louisiana:

Louisiana has at least one tribally-run school, Chitimacha Tribal School in Jeanerette.

The state has an Office of Indian Affairs that serves as a resource for Louisiana Native communities navigating local or state policies. Additionally, the Tunica-Biloxi tribe offers tribal student support programs for tutoring and school success.  

As of 2022, there are more than 4,300 Native students enrolled in public schools in Louisiana, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Maine:

Maine has a few schools specifically serving Native students. These include Indian Island School in Indian Island, Indian Township School in Princeton, and Sipayik Elementary School in Calais. You can read about all three at Maine Indian Education.

In 2001, Maine passed a law requiring Native history and culture be taught in schools across the state. A 2022 report by Wabanaki leaders highlights successes and failures of how the curriculum is currently being implemented in schools.

Maine’s Department of Education provides a list of educational Native Studies resources. You may also wish to check out the Maine Indian Tribal Commission

As of 2022, there are more than 1,300 Native students enrolled in public schools in Maine, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Maryland:

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state. Some districts offer special support and programming for Native students, like the Montgomery School Public Schools District, which has an American Indian Education Program

You may also wish to check out the Baltimore American Indian Center (BAIC), which provides skills training, afterschool programs, and other opportunities for Native families. 

As of 2022, there are more than 2,600 Native students enrolled in public schools in Maryland, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Massachusetts:

Massachusetts has no Bureau of Indian Education schools, but other educational opportunities exist. For example, the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe has an education department offering cultural presentations, after school support, Native films, performances, and even traditional gardens in collaboration with nearby schools. The programming is funded by the Department of Education.

You may also wish to check out the Massachusetts Center for Native American Awareness, which provides cultural enrichment for youth and other educational opportunities.

As of 2022, there are more than 1,800 Native students enrolled in public school in Massachusetts, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Michigan:

Michigan has a few schools specifically serving Native students. These include Hannahville Indian School in Wilson and Joseph K. Lumsden Bahweting Anishnabe PSA in Marie. About a dozen public school districts in Michigan are close to tribal territories and have significant Native enrollment; at Watersmeet Township School, for example, three out of four students are Native.

Legislation to add more Native history into the state’s recommended curriculum standards for grades 8-12 passed in 2022 and is currently being implemented. The Michigan Department of Education has also launched an Indigenous Education Initiative to work on areas impacting Native learners. Beginning in 2024, all Michigan district and charter schools must collect tribal affiliation data for students, with the goal of gaining more information about Native student achievement rates and making more schools eligible for federal funds for Native American education.

As of 2022, there are more than 8,600 Native students enrolled in public school in Michigan, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Minnesota:

Minnesota’s TrekNorth Junior & Senior High School is a charter school serving a high percentage of Native students and offering classes in American Indian language and culture. Minnesota also has a few tribally-run schools through the Bureau of Indian Education, including Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig School in Bena, Circle of Life Academy in White Earth, Fond du Lac Ojibwe School in Cloquet, and Nay Ah Shing / Pine Grove Schools in Onamia.

Some traditional public-school districts, like Minneapolis Public Schools, have an Indian Education Department. Minnesota even has a magnet school, American Indian Magnet School, with teachers specializing in the Lakota and Ojibwe languages, and a Catholic private school aimed at preserving Native culture, St. Mary’s Mission School. 

The American Indian OIC in Minneapolis provides community-based support for Native families. One of its initiatives is an alternative high school, Takoda Prep, affiliated with Minneapolis Public Schools. Takoda Prep focuses on individualized instruction, skills training, and supporting students in maintaining a strong connection to their culture.

As of 2022, there are more than 14,000 Native students enrolled in public school in Minnesota, making up more than 1% of the public school population. You can read a report on the state of American Indian Education at the Minnesota Department of Education.

Mississippi:

Mississippi has several tribally-run schools through the Bureau of Indian Education. These schools make up the Choctaw Tribal School System, which serves more than 2,000 students across eight schools. Operated by the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, this is the largest unified and locally-controlled Indian school system in the U.S.

As of 2022, there are also more than 880 Native students enrolled in public school in Mississippi, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Native students with special needs may be eligible for the state’s Equal Opportunity for Students with Special Needs Program, which provides funding that families can use for private school tuition.

Missouri:

There are no federally recognized tribes in the state of Missouri and there are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

Missouri does have an American Indian Cultural Center. Also, MO Humanities has a Native American Program with educational programming to raise awareness about the American Indian experience in Missouri.

As of 2022, there are more than 3,500 Native students enrolled in public school in Missouri, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Native families who meet certain eligibility requirements may be eligible for the Missouri Empowerment Scholarship Accounts Program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

Montana:

Montana became the first state, in 1999, to require Native studies. The state’s constitution says that Montana “recognizes the distinct and unique cultural heritage of American Indians and is committed in its educational goals to the preservation of their cultural integrity.” Currently, however, some Native tribes, parents, and students in Montana are bringing a lawsuit forward, arguing that this constitutional requirement is not being upheld. A bill passed in 2023 establishes a partnership between state education officials and Montana tribes with the goal of better reporting on Indian Education for All curriculum.

Montana also has a few schools specifically serving Native students. These include the tribally-run Northern Cheyenne Tribal School in Busby, and Two Eagle River School in Pablo.

Montana also has a few private Catholic schools with instruction in Native language and culture. These schools, which are largely funded by fundraising and private donations, include St. Labre Indian School in Ashland, St. Charles Mission School in Pryor, Pretty Eagle Catholic Academy in Xavier, and De La Salle Blackfeet School in Browning.

As of 2022, there are more than 15,900 Native students enrolled in public school in Montana, making up more than 10% of the public school population.

Nebraska:

Nebraska has a Commission on Indian Affairs that provides regular updates on Indian education news in the state. Lincoln Public Schools’ Indian Education Team is funded by a federal grant and offers many programs for Native students and their families, including success coaches, summer camps, and a Native advisory committee that parents can participate in.

Nebraska offers several schools that seek to preserve Native culture, including Umoⁿhoⁿ Nation Public Schools St. Augustine Mission School in Winnebago and the iSanti Community School, located on ISanti Sioux tribal lands.

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

As of 2022, there are more than 4,900 Native students enrolled in public school in Nebraska, making up more than 1% of the public school population.

Nevada:

Nevada has a few tribally-run schools, including Pyramid Lake Schools and Duckwater Shoshone Elementary Schools.

The Nevada Indian Commission offers events and news for Native families. Additionally, the Nevada Department of Education offers a list of resources for Native education, including curriculum and lesson plans.

As of 2022, there are more than 3,800 Native students enrolled in public school in Nevada, making up close to 1% of the public school population. More than 900 Native students are served by the Washoe County School District. The district is currently using a federal grant to hire more student graduation advocates to support Native students in becoming college and career ready.

New Hampshire:

There are no federally recognized tribes in New Hampshire today and there are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

The state does have a Commission on Native American Affairs to promote the needs of Native families. You may also wish to check out New Hampshire’s list of Native organizations with geographical or cultural interests in New Hampshire.

As of 2022, there are more than 330 Native students enrolled in public school in New Hampshire, making up less than 1% of the public school population.

Native families who meet certain eligibility requirements may be eligible for New Hampshire’s Education Freedom Account, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

New Jersey:

While there are federally recognized Indian tribes in New Jersey, there are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state. 

New Jersey’s Commission on Indian Affairs seeks to develop “programs and projects to further understanding of New Jersey’s American Indian history and culture.”

As of 2022, there are more than 2,700 Native students enrolled in public school in New Jersey, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

New Mexico:

New Mexico requires Native education be taught in schools. The NM Indian Education Act of 2003 established partnerships between Native tribes and the state’s education department to advance the educational and cultural needs of American Indian students in public schools, and a 2019 amendment to this law added a systemic framework for improving educational outcomes for Indian students.

In New Mexico, the Early Childhood Education and Care Department has worked with local indigenous leaders to create a digital workshop for tribal communities to develop their own instructional content. Additionally, New Mexico’s Indian Affairs Department has an Indigenous Youth Council that Native students from across the state participate in.

There are more than 40 Bureau of Indian Education-operated schools and tribally-controlled schools across the state.

One of the state’s schools that offers an immersion in Indigenous curriculum and culture is the Native American Community Academy, a public charter school in Albuquerque. Another school committed to maintaining Native cultural values is the Santa Fe Indian School, which is currently working to better connect tribes and students through reliable internet access. In Farmington, Navajo Preparatory School (the only Navajo-sanctioned, college-preparatory school for Native Americans) offers an International Baccalaureate curriculum. New Mexico even has a private Catholic school with the mission of serving Native students: St. Joseph Mission School in San Fidel.

As of 2022, there are more than 32,000 Native students enrolled in public school in New Mexico, making up more than 10% of the public school population. In Albuquerque Public Schools, for example, more than 7,000 students report tribal affiliations.

New York:

While there are federally recognized tribes in New York, there are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state. There are, however, several schools that teach Native youth, including Onondaga Elementary in Syracuse and Tuscarora Indian School near Buffalo.

The New York State Education Department has a Native American Education Unit that provides funding to school districts that educate Native children who live on reservations. In 2023, the New York State Education Department created an Indigenous Culture and Language Studies certificate for teachers, with the goal of allowing more children to learn about Native cultures.

As of 2022, there are more than 17,700 Native students enrolled in public school in New York, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

North Carolina:

North Carolina has a few schools specifically serving Native students. These include the tribally-run Cherokee Central Elementary School, Middle School, and High School.

Additionally, Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School is run by the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe and offers students academics integrated with Native culture.

North Carolina’s State Advisory Council on Indian Education aims to provide cultural opportunities for American Indian students. Also, the North Carolina Native American Youth Organization offers cultural and academic support to students.

In light of a bill passed in 2023, Native students are now guaranteed the right to wear their traditional regalia at school graduation ceremonies.

As of 2022, there are more than 16,900 Native students enrolled in public schools in Missouri, making up more than 1% of the public school population.

Native students with special needs may be eligible for the state’s Education Student Accounts program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

North Dakota:

North Dakota, where about 10% of students are Native American, has passed a law requiring that public schools teach Native history. You can learn more about the North Dakota Native American Essential Understandings curriculum at Teachings of Our Elders.

North Dakota has one of the highest numbers of schools serving Native students. You can find a complete list of public-school options for Native students at the North Dakota Indian Affairs Commission. Some of these schools are operated by tribal governments (including the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Nation, the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, and the Spirit Lake Nation) and some are operated by the Bureau of Indian Education. The list includes schools both on reservation and off reservation.

As of 2022, there are more than 9,700 Native students enrolled in public school in North Dakota, making up more than 8% of the public school population.

Ohio:

There are no federally recognized tribes in Ohio and there are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state. You may wish to search your area for Native educational programming near you. Regional organizations like the Greater Cincinnati Native American Coalition and Native American Center of Central Ohio work to preserve Native culture and offer learning opportunities.

As of 2022, there are more than 1,600 Native students enrolled in public schools in Ohio, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Oklahoma:

Oklahoma’s Department of Education has an Office of American Indian Education that works to build bridges between Native tribes and the state’s K-12 public school system. 

In Anadarko, Riverside Indian School is a school run by the Bureau of Indian Education that specifically serves Native students. It is the oldest and largest off-reservation boarding school in the U.S. There are also four tribally-run schools: Chickasaw Children’s Village, Eufaula Dormitory, Jones Academy, and Sequoyah High School.

Oklahoma also allows federally recognized Indian tribes to authorize charter schools in the state. In 2010, Tsalagi Tsunadeloquasdi became the first Oklahoma charter school for Cherokee language immersionSovereign Community School was the second Native charter school to open in the state, but permanently closed its doors in 2023.

Additionally, the state has passed legislation establishing Native education advisory councils to ensure that tribal nations have a say in how public education responds to the needs of students. The state has also recently passed legislation protecting the right of Native students to wear tribal regalia during graduation ceremonies.

According to the Oklahoma Department of Education, there are more than 130,000 Native students attending Oklahoma public schools. 

Oregon:

Oregon has passed a bill requiring the Oregon Department of Education to create Native curriculum for public schools and provide related professional development to teachers. The official state website offers a robust list of Native educational resources, including curriculum, newspapers, and organizations. One of these organizations is the Oregon Indian Education Association, which works with school districts to promote Indigenous knowledge in public education.

Oregon has at least one Bureau of Indian Education school serving Native students, the Chemawa Indian School in Salem.

As of 2022, there are more than 6,900 Native students enrolled in public school in Oregon, making up more than 1% of the public school population.

Pennsylvania:

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state. However, there are cultural resources for Native families, such as the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting awareness of the culture and language of the Lenape people.

As of 2022, there are more than 3,300 Native students enrolled in public school in Pennsylvania, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Rhode Island:

One of the Indian tribes in Rhode Island is the Narragansett Tribe. The tribe’s education department collaborates on many educational opportunities for Indian children, such as academic tutoring and workshops. 

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

As of 2022, there are more than 960 Native students enrolled in public school in Rhode Island, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

South Carolina:

The SC Commission for Minority Affairs has a Native American Affairs Division that promotes Native culture, especially through celebrating Native American Heritage Month in November. 

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

Native students may be eligible for for the state’s education scholarship program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

As of 2022, there are more than 2,300 Native students enrolled in public school in South Carolina, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

South Dakota:

In South Dakota public schools, Native students are the largest minority group. The state has approved a framework for teaching Native studies called the Oceti Sakowin Essential Understandings and Standards. Over the past five years, Native legislators have repeatedly proposed the creation of public charter schools that immerse students in Lakota Indian language and culture, but so far, no measure has been passed.

Along with North Dakota, South Dakota has one of the highest numbers of schools serving Native students. Schools operated by the Bureau of Indian Education include Cheyenne-Eagle Butte School, Flandreau Indian School, and Pine Ridge School.

There are well over a dozen tribally-run schools, including American Horse School, Crazy Horse School, Crow Creek Tribal School, Enemy Swim Day School, Isna Wica Owayawa (Loneman School), Little Eagle Grant School, Little Wound School, Lower Brule Schools, Marty Indian School, Pahin Sinte Owayawa School (Porcupine School), Pierre Indian School Learning Center, Rock Creek Grant School, St. Francis Indian School, Takini School, Tiospa Zina Tribal School, Tiospaye Topa School, and Wounded Knee District School.

Some public school districts, like the Sioux Falls School District, seek to support Native students with special senior honoring ceremonies.

South Dakota also has a few private schools aimed at preserving Native culture, like St. Joseph’s Indian School, Red Cloud Indian School and the new Oceti Sakowin Community Academy.

The South Dakota Indian Education Advisory Council was developed in 2004, and the Indian Education Act was passed in 2007 to support educational opportunities for Native families. You can learn more at the South Dakota Department of Tribal Relations.

There are also numerous non-profits serving Native families in South Dakota. For instance, the Native American Heritage Association provides food and supplies for Native families in need. 

As of 2022, there are more than 14,700 Native students enrolled in public school in South Dakota, making up more than 10% of the public school population.

Tennessee:

Tennessee has a Native American Indian Association, a statewide nonprofit organization that works to promote educational options and awareness of Indian culture. 

Specific Native tribes also offer their own educational programming. For instance, the Kituwah Preservation & Education Program works to revitalize the Cherokee language and promote awareness about the Cherokee people. 

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

As of 2022, there are more than 2,000 Native students enrolled in public school in Tennessee, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Native students who meet certain requirements may be eligible for the state’s Education Student Accounts programs, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

Texas:

In 2023, the Texas Education Agency approved an elective course for high schoolers on American Indian history and culture. Some Texas public school districts offer other special resources and learning opportunities geared toward Native families. For instance, Fort Worth Independent School District has an American Indian Education Program and offers a list online of suggested curricula, texts, and materials.

Additionally, there are state organizations and nonprofits that offer youth learning opportunities. For example, the Indigenous Cultures Institute hosts summer encounters and other youth programming for Native students in Texas and northern Mexico.

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state. 

As of 2022, there are more than 16,500 Native students enrolled in public school in Texas, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Utah:

Utah’s Board of Education has an American Indian Education program to promote opportunities for Native families. The program funds grants for school districts with a high concentration of Native students. 

Utah offers many state resources to promote awareness of Indigenous culture, such as the Utah Education Network’s American Indian Resources.

Native students may be eligible for for the state’s education scholarship program, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning, such as private school tuition.

The state has at least one Bureau of Indian Education school serving Native students, the Aneth Community School in Montezuma Creek, and one Navajo school, Richfield Residential Hall. In 2013, Navajo Nation and the state entered into an agreement to share student performance data with the aim of improving students’ transitions between public schools and Bureau of Indian Education schools.

As of 2022, there are more than 6,900 Native students enrolled in public school in Utah, making up more than 1% of the public school population.

Vermont:

Vermont has a Commission on Native American Affairs that works to empower the Native families in the state. Vermont’s Abenaki communities also offer educational programming. For example, the Nulhegan Abenkai Tribe has coordinated heritage days at schools and cultural workshops. 

There are no Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

As of 2022, there are more than 250 Native students enrolled in public school in Vermont, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Virginia:

Virginia requires that Native education be taught in schools. The state’s Department of Education offers learning resources about Native culture. 

Virginia does not have any Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools.

As of 2022, there are more than 3,700 Native students enrolled in public school in Virginia, making up close to 1% of the public school population.

Washington:

Washington has a tribally-developed curriculum, Since Time Immemorial: Tribal Sovereignty in Washington State, that is used by public-schools across the state.

The Washington State Indian Education Association works to improve educational opportunities for Native students, and the Governor’s Office of Indian Affairs offers a tribal directory.

Many public school districts offer unique learning opportunities for Native students, such as in Seattle Public Schools District, Spokane Public Schools, Bethel School District, and Peninsula School District. Grand Coulee Dam School District’s Lake Roosevelt Schools have an expanding Indian Education Program that gives students the opportunity to learn about root digging, traditional drumming, Native American literature, and more.

The state also has several tribally-run schools. These include Chief Leschi Schools in Puyallup, Lummi Nation School in Bellingham, Muckleshoot Tribal School in Auburn, Paschal Sherman Indian School in Omak, Quileute Tribal School in LaPush, Wa He Lut Indian School in Olympia, and Yakama Nation Tribal School in Toppenish.

In 2015, the Washington State-Tribal Education Compact Schools affirmed and empowered tribes to increase educational opportunities for Native students.

As of 2022, there are more than 11,900 Native students enrolled in public school in Washington, making up more than 1% of the public school population.

West Virginia:

There are no federally recognized Indian tribes or Bureau of Indian Education schools in this state.

The American Indians of West Virginia group works to promote Native heritage across the state through teaching activities and events. 

As of 2022, there are more than 250 Native students enrolled in public school in West Virginia, making up under 1% of the public school population.

Many Native students are eligible for the state’s Hope Scholarship, which allows families to receive a portion of their child’s public education funding to put toward personalized learning.

Wisconsin:

Wisconsin requires all public school districts to provide instruction on the state’s tribal nations. The state also lists resources related to American Indian education, which include the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. Additionally, Wisconsin First Nations provides educational videos and lesson plans for all grades about Native studies.

There are at least three tribally-run schools in Wisconsin: Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe School in Hayward, Menominee Tribal School in Neopit, and Oneida Nation School. In 2022, the Menominee Indian School District opened a pre-K and kindergarten charter school called Kaehkēnawapatāēq, where students practice the Menominee language.

As of 2022, there are more than 8,200 Native students enrolled in public school in Wisconsin, making up about 1% of the public school population.

Wyoming:

Wyoming requires the history and culture of Native tribes in Wyoming to be included in public-school standards.

Wyoming’s Department of Education provides a robust list of Native resources, including Open Range Wyoming, a collection of free educational resources for schools, and Wind River Education Project, lessons and videos about Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho people.

Wyoming has at least one tribally-run school, St. Stephens Indian School, funded by the Bureau of Indian Education. Additionally, Wyoming Indian Schools serve families on the Wind River Reservation.

As of 2022, there are more than 2,800 Native students enrolled in public-school in Wyoming, making up more than 3% of the public school population.

Ultimately, the best educational choice for your unique student is a decision up to you. 

As you school-search, keep in mind that learning in an environment that bolsters your Native heritage does not have to end with high school. There are 37 tribal colleges and universities in the country, such as the Northwest Indian College, which serves Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

To learn more about educational opportunities for Native families, here is a list of additional organizations and resources you may wish to check out: 

  • Administration for Native Americans: The Administration for Native Americans promotes self-sufficiency for Native communities by supporting grants for community-based projects.
  • American Indian Catholic Schools Network: Affiliated with the Alliance for Catholic Education, the American Indian Catholic Schools Network is a coalition of private Native schools representing the Acoma, Blackfeet, Laguna, Lakota, Navajo, Ojibwe, Omaha, San Carlos Apache, and Winnebago Indian tribes.
  • American Indian Education Fund: The American Indian Education Fund (formerly the American Indian Education Foundation) is a program geared toward high school students and their families. It offers scholarships, literacy programs, and school supplies for college.
  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society: The American Indian Science and Engineering Society encourages Native students to pursue STEM education and careers. The organization offers internships, conferences, leadership development, and other programming.
  • Bureau of Indian Education: The Bureau of Indian Education’s mission is to provide quality educational opportunities to Native students in accordance with tribal needs for cultural well-being.
  • Center for Native American Youth: The Center for Native American Youth is a national education organization that supports and advocates for Native young people. 
  • Education for Parents of Indian Children with Special Needs: Education for Parents of Indian Children with Special Needs is a non-profit that supports and advocates for families of Native children with disabilities, developmental delays, special healthcare needs, or who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Indian County Today: Indian County Today is an independent, non-profit news enterprise covering tribes and Native people throughout America. Search “education” at the site for recent education news and developments. 
  • Indigenous Homeschoolers: Indigenous Homeschoolers is a private Facebook group with more than 1,200 members. The group is open to all Indigenous families looking for support and ideas about homeschooling their children.
  • National Congress of American Indians: The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) was founded in 1944, making it the oldest American Indian and Alaska Native organization “serving the broad interests of tribal governments and communities.” One of the policy issues the NCAI focuses on is education.
  • National Museum of the American Indians’ Native Knowledge 360: A project of the Smithsonian, the National Museum of the American Indian’s Native Knowledge 360 offers educational resources on Indigenous culture for a variety of grades. It also offers professional development opportunities for teachers.
  • National Indian Education Association (NIEA): National Indian Education Association’s mission is to advance educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. The NIEA furthers this mission through digital resources, webinars, events, supporting schools in building Native Language programs, and much more. 
  • National Indian Education Study 2019: This in-depth study of Native fourth-graders and eighth-graders around the country provides information about how school teachers and administrators play a part in preserving students’ cultural heritage.
  • National Indian Head Start Directors Association: The National Indian Head Start Directors Association is an organized voice for Indian Head Start programs and the Native families they serve.
  • National Indian Impacted Land Association: The National Indian Impacted Land Association advocates for nearly 600 Indian land school districts, including work to address facility needs.
  • National Johnson O’Malley Association: The National Johnson O’Malley Association is a nonprofit for discussing educational excellence for Indian students and advocating the rights of Indian students.
  • Native American Heritage Month: Officially designated in 1990, November is celebrated as National American Indian Heritage Month or Native American Heritage Month. Google Arts and Culture offers 10 ideas for celebrating the month
  • Native Hope: Native Hope shares Native stories and offers educational resources to support Native communities.
  • Native News Online. One of the “most-read daily American Indian news publications,” the Native News Online has an education section dedicated to developments in K-12 and undergraduate educational opportunities for Native students.
  • Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics & Native Americans in Science: This organization is dedicated to the success of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native students in attaining advanced degrees, careers, and positions of leadership in STEM. It offers members an online network, among other opportunities.
  • Tribal Education Departments National Assembly: The Tribal Education Departments National Assembly seeks to provide resources and support to tribes in reclaiming sovereignty in education.
  • White House Tribal Nations Summit 2022: During the November-December 2022 White House Tribal Nations Summit, many announcements impacting Native families were made. Find a full list of initiatives, including several impacting K-12 education, at the White House website.

The information in this guide is designed to help Native families in the K-12 decision-making process. Our mission is to provide families with the information they need about all the school options available – traditional public, public charter, public magnet, private, online, at home, and microschooling – so they can choose the right fit for their child. Read more guides about choosing schools.

School Choice Week Dance Tutorial

National School Choice Week 2024 Dance is here

Learn, Move, and Groove with Us!

Get ready to put on your dancing shoes and have some fun! We are excited to announce that the NSCW dance is back this year!

Special thanks to Indian River Charter High School from Vero Beach, Florida, for hosting this year’s dance and sharing their groovy steps with to celebrate National School Choice Week 2024.

School Choice Week 2024 Dance

Join the #schoolchoiceweek conversation!

Sharing your own dance video is a great way to get people talking about school choice. We encourage you to tag us using @SchoolChoiceWeek or use #schoolchoiceweek wherever you post it online! Have fun, and thank you for celebrating with us! 

This year’s song is ‘Ready Now’ performed by Golden Blue. The song is fully licensed, and you may download it for your use. Find the song’s lyrics here.

Want your school to be considered for creating next year’s dance and tutorial video? We’d love to hear from you! Tag your dance video with #schoolchoiceweek or send us a direct message on any social media platform.

How We Celebrated: Open House

Thousands of schools participate in National School Choice Week each year, using the week to showcase what makes them unique. One of the most popular ways schools participate in the Week is by hosting an open house or an informational night, welcoming existing or prospective families to get to know their learning community better.  

Thousands of schools participate in National School Choice Week each year, using the week to showcase what makes them unique. One of the most popular ways schools participate in the Week is by hosting an open house or an informational night, welcoming existing or prospective families to get to know their learning community better.  

During National School Choice Week 2020, for instance, Global Village Academy in Colorado hosted a “Coffee with the Principal” event. Current school families and prospective families had the opportunity to enjoy fellowship over warm drinks. They received information about the school and heard directly from school leaders too.

No two schools are exactly alike, and no two open houses have to be either. If you choose to plan an open house during National School Choice Week, the goal of the event and who you welcome from the community is up to you. During the last couple of years we’ve seen a beautiful variety of school open houses… 

Life Academy paired its National School Choice Week open house with an ice-cream social and varsity and junior varsity basketball games. 

Meanwhile, Corpus Christi Catholic School hosted a community open house with a spaghetti dinner, celebrating National School Choice Week and the first day of open enrollment for the upcoming school year. 

In New York, Westfall Academy opted for a pancake meal, welcoming community members to visit and learn more about their school culture. 

A Florida group of the homeschool community Classical Conversations hosted an open house and networking opportunity for parents looking to learn more about homeschooling and Classical education. 

classical-conversations-homeschoolers-take-group-photo
homeschool-students-pose-with-signs

In New Jersey, Thomas Edison EnergySmart Charter School hosted a “Parent Academy” during National School Choice Week to give moms and dads an opportunity to learn more about what a charter school is, what school choice means, and more.

And in Texas, Guadalupe Regional Middle School opened their doors to local community professionals, inviting them to share a meal and mentoring with students. 

mentoring-lunch-at-guadalupe-regional-middle-school
student-raises-hand

The bottom line is this: Often, planning a successful open house is a job best planned by a team. You’ll want to spread the word effectively and showcase the best of your school. You’ll want visitors to leave with a better sense of what makes your school stand out.

It can also be a ton of fun! Besides strengthening communication between school families and staff, open houses are a valuable way to work toward school enrollment goals.

How will you celebrate? 

If you’re interested in planning an open house or another special event this January, reach out to Mackenzie Mate at mackenzie@schoolchoiceweek.com.

For more celebration ideas, explore our Event Ideas and How-To Guides

Our How We Celebrated series gives you insider glimpses into how a few of the thousands of NSCW participants have chosen to celebrate their schools. 

How We Celebrated: Field Trip

One popular way that schools, homeschool groups, online learning communities, and families celebrate education during National School Choice Week is by going on a field trip. 

Field trips can be fantastic opportunities for students to deepen friendships with classmates and engage in their local community. They also celebrate how learning can take place everywhere. Wearing School Choice Week’s signature scarves on the field trip can help students feel like a team and think about the impact that choice has made for them. 

Selecting a place to visit and planning for chaperones, transportation, and other details will require some prep work. The result? A new, exciting adventure for students.

In Washington, for example, Olympic Christian School students celebrated learning during National School Choice Week 2020 with an all-school trip to the Pacific Science Center. Students had a chance to explore marine life, rockets, galaxies, and much more.

field-trip-students-pose-for-picture
olympic-christian-school-students-jump-for-photo
students-explore-science-center

Meanwhile, in Virginia, the community at Virginia Virtual Academy celebrated National School Choice Week and ten years of online learning by field tripping to the state capitol in Richmond for a day of festivities. Students and parents received School Choice Week’s signature yellow scarves. After signing a School Choice Week banner, they enjoyed a commemorative group photo in front of the capitol building. 

VAVA-students-pose-for-photo-at-the-capitol
VAVA-field-trip-to-capitol
VAVA-students-celebrate-NSCW

In Ohio, Emerson Academy of Dayton’s choral group students took an outing to Cincinnati during National School Choice Week 2020, where they had the opportunity to perform “God Bless America” at a professional hockey game. They didn’t forget to wear their National School Choice Week scarves!

choral-students-perform-at-sports-game
hockey-game-field-trip

The bottom line is this: A field trip is more than a day of learning; it’s a lasting memory for students. You’ll need to develop and follow guidelines for meals, transportation, and more to make sure the trip runs smoothly. But the adventure will be worth it! Don’t forget to take photos and videos to share with families or local media. 

How will you celebrate? 

If you’re interested in planning a field trip or another special event this January, reach out to Mackenzie Mate at mackenzie@schoolchoiceweek.com.

For more celebration ideas, explore our Event Ideas and How-To Guides

Our How We Celebrated series gives you insider glimpses into how a few of the thousands of NSCW participants have chosen to celebrate their schools.

How We Celebrated: Classroom Contest

Schools and homeschool groups in all 50 states celebrate National School Choice Week because education is worth celebrating. Schools are where children become successful, happy, and ready to give back. 

One of the easiest ways to participate in the Week and build school spirit is by decorating your learning environment. Each year we receive hundreds of inspiring photos of the ways schools decorate to celebrate. Many schools even make decorating into a class contest! 

In California, for example, International Bible Baptist Academy held a craft contest day during National School Choice Week.

classroom-contest-sign
Ephesus-Junior-Academy-celebrates-NSCW

Some schools host a classroom door decorating contest or bulletin board decorating contest, encouraging each classroom to showcase their style during National School Choice Week.

Classroom door decorating contest during National School Choice Week
Classroom decor for National School Choice Week at Minnesota Math and Science Academy St. Paul

And in every state, students and teachers of all ages decorate School Choice Week placards each year. Filling out placards can be just for fun. Or, there can be prizes for the most creative, most surprising, most thoughtful, and so on. Don’t forget to invite teachers and staff to fill out why they love the school too!

students-stand-by-decorated-door
students-decorate-banner-with-handprints

If you’re aiming for collaboration rather than a fun classroom contest, working together to complete the National School Choice Week banner may be a good move. For example, many schools and families make the banner their own each January, personalizing it with their handprints, logo, or just plenty of color with paints, markers, colored pencils, or crayons.

student-poses-by-NSCW-banner
School-Choice-Week-banner

The bottom line is this: Decorating and classroom contests can be as simple or as involved as you choose. If you encourage students to reflect on why they love their school choice, the depth of their reasons may surprise you. Post these reasons around the school (or around your house if you’re a homeschooler!). They can have a lasting impact long after National School Choice Week is over. 

Rochester-School-For-The-Deaf-celebrates-NSCW
kids-hold-NSCW-banner

How will you celebrate? 

If you’re interested in planning a class contest or another special event this January, reach out to Mackenzie Mate at mackenzie@schoolchoiceweek.com.

Already know how you’re celebrating? Sign up for your free Deluxe Event Planner Kit today. 

Our How We Celebrated series gives you insider glimpses into how a few of the thousands of NSCW participants have chosen to celebrate their schools.

How We Celebrated: School Rally

Chess tournament, movie screening, pancake breakfast, grandparents day, spirit night, parade, service project… How will you celebrate school choice this January?

One of the most dynamic ways we see schools celebrate their learning choice each National School Choice Week is through pep rallies. Not only can rallies kick off the January semester with positive vibes, they can be powerful tools to build school spirit in a community.  

For National School Choice Week 2020, for example, yellow fleeces were flying as Freedom Prep Academy rallied in celebration. After handing out scarves to students and staff, the school community gathered in the gym to turn up the music and participate in the National School Choice Week dance

Students-Wave-Yellow-Scarves

Then, students sat cross-legged with their friends. Student representatives and special guest speakers took the mic to reflect on school choice’s impact on their lives. As you can see, the rally planners didn’t miss the opportunity for great photos! 

Speaker-At-Freedom-Prep-Rally
Freedoom-Prep-Academy-Students-Applaud

Meanwhile, at Butte Central Catholic High School in Montana, students assembled in their school’s rotunda for their own celebratory rally. Local community leaders were invited to visit and students received a school-choice themed message from their principal. Principal J.P. Williams shared in his remarks.

“School choice is super important. There are so many reasons why parents choose to send their kids to a particular school, or a particular school system,”

Principal J.P. Williams

Butte Central Catholic High School’s rally included the reading of a local proclamation officially recognizing the week as National School Choice Week. 

Butte-Central-High-School-Rally

Some schools find it easier to go outside for a rally rather than clearing a space inside their school building. Harmony School of Science gathered outside during National School Choice Week 2020 to celebrate and perform the dance they’d been practicing:

The bottom line is this: A pep rally is an incredibly rewarding way to bring students and staff together and celebrate in the comfort of your school. It will require more effort than simply handing out scarves or wristbands. But, taking your celebration to this next level will allow your students to soak in the excitement of what their school choice offers.

How will you celebrate? 

If you’re interested in planning a rally or another special event this January, reach out to Mackenzie Mate at mackenzie@schoolchoiceweek.com

Already know how you’re celebrating? Sign up for your free Deluxe Event Planner Kit today. 

Our How We Celebrated series gives you insider glimpses into how a few of the thousands of NSCW participants have chosen to celebrate their schools. 

¿Qué tienen en común Lady Gaga, Denzel Washington, y Ariana Grande? Bueno, por un lado, todos ellos asistieron a escuelas privadas o escueekas particulares en algún momento durante su educación K-12.

Hoy, hay decenas de miles de escuelas privadas en toda América. Desde escuelas Católicas, a escuelas independientes, a escuelas con currículo especial, escuelas privadas que ofrecen culturas diferentes para que los estudiantes aprendan. 

Pero la educación privada no es nada nuevo. Escuelas privadas o independientes en Estados Unidos datan desde muy atrás antes de la fundación de los Estados Unidos.

Las escuelas privadas por naturaleza son escuelas por elección. Ningún estudiante es asignado automáticamente a una escuela privada por ningún distrito o agencia. Las escuelas privadas están arraigadas en la creencia de que las familias deben ser capaces de escoger el ambiente de aprendizaje que coincida con su visión del mundo, valores religiosos, o filosofía de la educación. 

A menudo las escuelas dentro del centro de la ciudad están superpobladas y no responden a las necesidades de cada estudiante. Nuestra escuela es íntima, orientada a la familia, y los niños están cómodos aquí. Tenemos una matrícula muy baja para una escuela independiente, pero muchos estudiantes son de familias de bajo ingreso y están ayudados por el Fondo de Becas para Niños. – Lois Gregory, fundadora de una escuela privada en el Bronx

Las escuelas privadas pueden ser mucho más asequibles de lo que usted piensa. Muchos estados tienen programas de becas, los cuales pueden sufragar los costos de la escuela privada. Por lo general esas becas están limitadas para estudiantes de familias de bajo o mediano ingreso, o estudiantes con necesidades especiales. Además de los programas de becas financiados por el estado, la mayoría de las escuelas privadas individuales también proveen becas basadas en la necesidad o becas académicas para estudiantes. Las organizaciones de la comunidad también algunas veces proporcionarán becas, como organizaciones nacionales tales como el Fondo de Becas para Niños y las Becas ACE.

[bctt tweet=”No, la escuela privada no siempre es una opción cara. Lea esta guía de escuelas privadas hecha por @SchoolChoiceWk’s para conocer detalles, costos y becas en su estado.” url=”https://schoolchoiceweek.com/escuelas-privadas/” via=”no”]

Hemos hecho esta guía de inicio para responder sus preguntas sobre escuelas privadas, enlaces a programas de ayuda para la matrícula de escuelas privadas en su estado, y más. 

 

 

¿Te gusta lo que ves? ¡Ingrese su correo electrónico para obtener más recursos educativos gratuitos!

¿Es esta la primera vez que navega por el sistema educativo en los Estados Unidos? Si es así, es esencial saber que la educación K-12 es obligatoria, gratuita y abierta a todos los niños de este país, independientemente de los ingresos familiares, el estado migratorio o la religión.

Cada familia tiene una escuela pública local asignada a la que es gratis asistir, pero en la mayoría de los lugares usted puede elegir entre otras escuelas públicas gratuitas como escuelas chárter, escuelas magnet o escuelas en línea; o seleccionar una escuela privada o educación en el hogar. Encuentre más información sobre la estructura del sistema educativo aquí y algunas preguntas frecuentes para padres migrantes de primera generación que buscan opciones de elección de escuela aquí.

 

 estudiantes de escuelas privadas celebran elección de escuela

 

Preguntas frecuentes sobre la Escuela Privada

¿Cuáles son las diferencias entre escuelas privadas y escuelas públicas? ¿Son las escuelas privadas mejores?

Hemos resaltado algunas de las diferencias entre escuelas privadas y escuelas públicas en la tabla a continuación. En cuanto a cuál es mejor, ¡eso depende de su estudiante! Es importante tener tanta información como pueda para determinar cual es la mejor opción para su hijo en particular. Escuelas públicas siempre tienen matrícula gratis, mientras que las escuelas privadas generan sus propios fondos a través de matrículas, subvenciones privadas y recaudación de fondos. Cubriremos opciones para reducir el costo de las escuelas privadas más adelante en esta guía.

Las escuelas privadas pueden establecer sus propios estándares de admisión, mientras que las escuelas públicas chárter deben aceptar a todos los estudiantes, y las escuelas públicas tradicionales deben aceptar a todos los estudiantes dentro de una región geográfica designada, dependiendo del estado.

 

¿Dónde puedo encontrar evaluaciones o reseñas de escuelas privadas?

 Usted puede encontrar la categoría o clasificación en algunos lugares. GreatSchools tiene perfiles escolares para la mayoría de las escuelas privadas del país donde puede encontrar información general, datos demográficos de los estudiantes, y reseñas de los padres. Niche es otro sitio donde puede encontrar información sobre una escuela privada. Sus perfiles escolares tienen información relacionada con lo académico, diversidad, maestros, preparación universitaria, clubes y actividades, y deportes. Revisión de la Escuela Privada también tiene perfiles de diferentes escuelas privadas, compartiendo información como descripción de la escuela, datos del cuerpo estudiantil, información académica y docente, finanzas y datos de admisión, e incluso una lista de escuelas relacionadas para ayudarlo en su búsqueda. Solo recuerde, ¡revisión no es todo! Usted puede hacer la mejor decisión para su hijo visitando las escuelas en persona o hablando con el personal de la escuela. 

Joven encendiendo velas en la escuela privada hebrea

 

¿Las escuelas privadas tienen que seguir los estándares del estado?

Cada estado establece sus propias reglas para las escuelas privadas. Muchos de ellos requieren que las escuelas privadas estén acreditadas, autorizadas o aprobadas por el estado. Típicamente las escuelas privadas también siguen las reglas del estado para seguridad, salud, códigos del edificio y la cantidad mínima de días escolares requeridos.

 

¿Qué son vales, cupones escolares 0 vouchers para escuela privada?

Un vale para la escuela  les permite a las familias usar todo o parte del fondo público destinado a la educación de sus hijos para pagar la matrícula en una escuela privada. Quince estados y Washington, D.C. tienen programas de vale para escuelas. 

 

¿Qué son becas de crédito fiscal o tax credit schoolarship? 

De acuerdo a EdChoice, “Becas de crédito fiscal le permite a los contribuyentes recibir créditos fiscales totales o parciales cuando ellos donan a organizaciones sin fines de lucro que proporcionarán becas a escuelas privadas.” 21 estados tienen programas de becas de crédito fiscal. En cada estado, las leyes establecen un límite en la cantidad de créditos fiscales que se pueden distribuir. Entonces, el tamaño y disponibilidad de las becas de crédito fiscal varían según el estado. 

 

¿Qué es ESA?

De acuerdo a EdChoice, “ESA, o Cuentas de Ahorro para la Educación, son cuentas de ahorro que permite a los padres retirar a sus hijos de las escuelas públicas del distrito o de las escuelas chárter y recibir un deposito de fondos públicos en cuentas de ahorro autorizadas por el gobierno.” Las familias pueden usar esos fondos para pagar la matrícula de la escuela privada u otros gastos de aprendizaje (tutoría privada, uniformes, terapia educacional, etc.). Actualmente hay programas activos de ESA en Arizona, Florida, Indiana, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Tennessee y West Virginia. Adicionalmente, en 2021 Kentucky y Missouri crearon programas ESA financiadas por donaciones de creditos fiscales, en vez de ser financiadas directamente por el estado.

 

 

Cómo Escoger una Escuela Privada

Alentamos a los padres a seguir los siete pasos descritos en The School Choice Roadmap para todos los asuntos de búsqueda de escuela. Este proceso completo, comprensible, está diseñado para ayudar a todas las familias a identificar los ambientes de aprendizaje que satisfagan las necesidades de sus hijos. Esos pasos incluyen:

1. Explorar sus opciones de escuela privada:

El primer paso que usted quiere tomar es investigar las opciones de la escuela privada cerca de usted. Puede empezar utilizando nuestra herramienta gratuita Schools Near Me Tool, en esta herramienta usted pueden ingresar su codigo postal y seleccionar “private schools”.

Las escuelas privadas son increíblemente diversas, por lo que es probable que pueda considerar una variedad de escuelas religiosas y no religiosas.

Para saber si los estudiantes de escuelas privadas en su estado son elegibles para los servicios de educación especial, puede explorar las reglas estatales que compilamos en “Cómo continuar con su IEP, incluso si comienza la educación en el hogar“.

 

2. Contactar

Si hay una escuela privada que le interesa, contactelos para tener más información. También usted va a querer hacer un recorrido o programar una llamada de teléfono con la administración de la escuela. Aquí hay algunas preguntas que puede hacer o considerar: ¿Cuál es el enfoque especial de la escuela? ¿Cuánto es la matrícula? ¿La escuela provee algun tipo de transporte? ¿Hya alguna opción de cuidado después de la escuela ? ¿Cuál es el tamaño de las clases? ¿Qué deportes o actividades extra curriculares están disponibles?

estudiante de escuela privada tira baloncesto

3. Preguntar sobre Becas

Su primer paso hacia identificar becas es preguntar a la escuela privada que usted está considerando. Las escuelas están felices de compartir información sobre oportunidades de becas en la comunidad local. Usted también puede consultar nuestra lista a continuación para saber si hay becas estatales disponibles en su estado. 

Algunas organizaciones nacionales como el Fondo de Becas para Niños  y Becas ACE  también ofrecen becas desde K-12. Cada año, el Fondo de Becas para Niños y sus organizaciones asociadas otorgan millones en becas a estudiantes a través de 19 estados. 

 

4. Aplicar:

Una vez que sus preguntas han sido respondidas, usted puede avanzar con la solicitud a la escuela privada si lo desea. Dependiendo de la escuela, hay muchos requisitos especiales de ingreso para su hijo, como ensayos, una entrevista o un examen.

 

5. Comenzar:

Si su hijo es aceptado en la escuela privada, usted debera pedir información a su escuela anterior que se transferirá,  pregunte si hay algo que usted debe de hacer por su parte. Como padre / tutor legal, usted puede pedir a la escuela una copia del registro de educación de su hijo. Si su estudiante tiene algún servicio adicional, como un plan de intervención o como se le conoce en ingles, Individualized Education Plan, un plan de educación individualizado, un plan 504 o un plan de respuesta médica, ¡asegúrese de que también se envíe una copia de esta información a la nueva escuela!

 

Opciones de Escuela Privada Cerca de Mi

Muchas escuelas privadas y organizaciones sin lucro ofrecen becas para estudiantes. Además, 32 estados ofrecen programas que proporcionarán becas para escuelas privadas o asistencia para familias para matrículas en escuelas privadas. De esos estados, 23 estados ofrecen programas oficiales de becas, 8 estados ofrecen ambos, programas de becas y deducción, y 1 estado ofrece solo un programa de deducción.

Haga clic en su estado en la lista a continuación para saber sobre los costos de escuelas privadas, becas, y organizaciones. También puede encontrar escuelas Cristianas cerca de su zona postal en la Asociación Internacional de Escuelas Cristianas, y escuelas Católicas cerca de su zona postal en la Asociación Educacional Nacional Católica. 

[custom_us_map type=”color” sector=”private”]
Fuente: Ed Choice, 2019

Alabama:

Hay más de 425 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Alabama. La matrícula promedio en escuelas privadas en el estado es $7,225 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $7,700.

Mientras que el costo de matrícula en escuela privada puede parecer como una barrera, Alabama tiene dos programas de becas que pueden ayudar a las familias que deseen asistir a escuelas privadas. Niños de familias que califican para el programa federal de almuerzo gratis o reducido, pueden aplicar al Programa de Becas de Educación. Mientras tanto, la Ley de Responsabilidad de Alabama de 2013 permite a los padres que transfieren a sus estudiantes de una escuela pública que falla a una escuela pública que no falla, o a una escuela privada acreditada aplicando para un crédito fiscal reembolsable.

Obtenga más información en la Federación de Alabama para NiñosFondo de Oportunidad de Becas de Alabama.

 

Alaska:

Hay más de 60 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Alaska. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $6,852 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $5,819.

Desafortunadamente, no hay opciones de becas en Alaska al momento, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en Departamento de Educación de Alaska, Educación Católica– Arquidiócesis de Anchorage,Privateschoolreview: Alaska.

 

Arizona:

Hay más de 450 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Arizona. La matrícula promedio para las escuelas privadas en el estado es de $9,736 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $15,692.

En Arizona hay actualmente cinco programas de becas estatales, los cuales pueden ayudar a las familias a pagar la matrícula de las escuelas privadas. Uno de esos es el primer programa de becas de crédito fiscal de la nación, promulgado en 1997.

Todos los estudiantes de K-12  interesados en escoger escuela privada son elegibles para solicitar ayuda. Arizona lanzó otro programa de becas de crédito fiscal por ingresos individuales en 2012. Arizona también ofrece programas de becas de crédito fiscal enfocándose en becas para niños de bajo ingreso. La “Ley de Lexie” ofrece becas de crédito fiscal para estudiantes con necesidades especiales. Finalmente, Arizona promulgó un programa de Cuentas de Becas de Empoderamiento. Para ser elegible, los estudiantes deben haber asistido a la escuela pública durante al menos 100 días del año fiscal anterior y cumplir con varios requisitos.

Obtenga más información en Federación para Niños de Arizona, Escoja una Escuela de Arizona, Ame Su Escuela, Escuelas Católicas de Phoenix, tambien puede contactar a becas AAA, y Privateschoolreview: Arizona.

 

Arkansas:

Hay más de 175 escuelas privadas  a través del estado de Arkansas. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $5,950 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $6,736.

Arkansas tiene un programa de becas estatal llamado Programa de Becas de Éxito (Succeed Scholarship Program en ingles) para niños con necesidades especiales; esto puede ayudar a las familias elegibles a pagar la matrícula de la escuela privada. En 2021, el Programa de Becas Succeed se amplió para incluir a los hijos de miembros en servicio activo o de reserva del ejército de los EE. UU. Las familias pueden obtener más información y descargar una solicitud en The Reform Alliance. En 2019-2020, 427 estudiantes de Arkansas usaron la Beca Succeed.

En el 2021, Arkansas creó un nuevo programa de becas de crédito fiscal en el que aproximadamente el 38% de las familias en todo el estado son elegibles por ingresos. A ser lanzado en 2022, este Programa de Becas de Inversión Filantrópica en Arkansas Kids ofrece becas de hasta aproximadamente $ 6,000 que los estudiantes elegibles pueden usar para gastos de escuelas privadas.

Además, las becas ACE ofrecen becas parciales a escuelas privadas K-12 para familias de bajos ingresos en Arkansas.

Obtenga más información en Revisión de escuelas privadas: Arkansas.

 

Obtenga más información en Privateschoolsreview: Arkansas. 

 

California:

Hay más de 3,790 escuelas privadas  a través del estado de California. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $14,357 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $20,890. La matrícula puede variar bastante y puede ser mucho más baja en algunos casos.

Desafortunadamente, en California no hay actualmente ninguna beca estatal para ayudar a las familias a pagar la matrícula de la escuela privada. Pero, becas proporcionadas por entidades privadas pueden estar disponibles. Obtenga más información en Asociación de Organizaciones de Escuelas Privadas de California, El Financiamiento BASICO, y Privateschoolreview: California.

  

Colorado:

Hay más de 500 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Colorado. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $10,546 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias es (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) $15,840.

Desafortunadamente, en Colorado no hay programas de becas estatales para ayudar a las familias a pagar la matrícula de escuelas privadas. Sin embargo, puede haber becas disponibles con fondos privados. Becas ACE, por ejemplo, trabaja para proporcionar becas a estudiantes desfavorecidos en Colorado y otros estados.

Obtenga más información en Asociación de Escuelas Privadas en ColoradoSemillas de Esperanza, Conferencia Católica de Colorado, y Privateschoolreview:Colorado.

 

Connecticut:

Hay más de 400 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Connecticut. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $22,793 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $38,006.

Desafortunadamente, en Connecticut no hay becas estatales para ayudar a las familias a pagar la matrícula de escuelas privadas.

Obtenga más información en CEO Fundación de Connecticut, la Conferencia Católica de Connecticut, y Privateschoolreview: Connecticut

 

Delaware:

Hay más de 130 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Delaware. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $10,490 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $11,707.

Delaware tiene más de 25 escuelas privadas de donde los padres pueden escoger. Desafortunadamente, en Delaware no hay opciones para becas estatales para escuelas privadas, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en Diócesis Católica de Wilmington, Privateschoolreview: Delaware y Aprende Mas DE.

 

Florida:

Hay más de 2,442 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Florida. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $9,294 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $10,328.

Si bien la matrícula puede parecer una barrera, la Florida tiene cinco programas estatales que pueden ayudar a las familias que desean elegir la educación privada. Programas estatales se extienden a estudiantes en familias con ingresos modestos, con un Plan de Educación Individualizado, o víctimas de violencia en escuelas públicas, además de algunos otros grupos de estudiantes. 

En 2021, varios de estos programas estatales (incluyendo la beca John M. McKay y la beca Gardiner) se incorporaron a la beca de empoderamiento familiar para agilizar la experiencia de solicitud de las familias. La nueva consolidación amplió quién es elegible para recibir asistencia y aumenta la cantidad de becas disponibles para las familias de Florida. Por último, permite a las familias utilizar los vales de empoderamiento familiar en gastos educativos más allá de la matrícula (como tecnología e Internet).

Aproximadamente el 62% de los estudiantes en Florida (2,2 millones de niños) son elegibles para una beca o un vale de crédito fiscal. Un excelente recurso para las familias que desean aprender más sobre escuelas privadas y oportunidades de becas, es Mi Elección en Ed FL y tambien SteUp for Students.  

 

Obtenga más información en Asociación de Escuelas Académicas No Públicas de Florida, la Conferencia Católica de Florida, y Privateschoolreview: Florida.

 

Georgia:

Hay más de 853 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Georgia. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $10,630 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $11,661.

Las escuelas privadas de Georgia cobran matrícula, pero todos los estudiantes de escuelas públicas de Georgia son elegibles para un programa de crédito fiscal para gastos de educación. Si está interesado en esta opción, comuníquese directamente con una de las Organizaciones de Becas para Estudiantes del estado que figuran en el sitio web del Departamento de Educación de Georgia. Estas organizaciones administran becas de escuelas privadas y pueden informarle sobre la disponibilidad y los próximos pasos.

El estado también tiene un programa de becas para niños con necesidades especiales. En 2021, este programa se expandió para incluir a estudiantes con un plan 504 para una variedad de afecciones (autismo, cáncer, abuso de drogas, etc.). Puede haber fondos adicionales disponibles de otras fuentes.

Las escuelas privadas de Georgia ofrecen formatos únicos, currículo y culturas para que los estudiantes aprendan. Una escuela privada con la que hablamos, Cornerstone Preparatory Academy, tiene un formato llamado “Modelo Universitario”. La directora de la escuela, Jeanne Borders, describe: “Nuestros estudiantes de secundaria tienen clases en el campus tres días a la semana (lunes, miércoles y viernes), como en una universidad. Ellos hacen su trabajo desde casa los martes y jueves con nuestras tareas asignadas para ellos. Luego tenemos a nuestros niños de primaria aquí los martes y jueves, y nos asociamos con sus padres para impartir lecciones y enseñar juntos los días que están en casa. La matrícula para ambos grupos de estudiantes es mucho menor, y los padres y las familias participan en la educación de los niños.” 

Obtenga más información en la Arquidiócesis de Atlanta y Privateschoolreview: Georgia

 

Hawaii:

Hay más de 130 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Hawaii. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $13,302 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $16,063.

Desafortunadamente, en Hawaii no hay ninguna beca estatal para ayudar a las familias con el costo de la escuela privada.

Obtenga más información en Directorio de la Escuela de la Diócesis Católica de Honolulu y Privateschoolreview: Hawaii

 

Idaho:

Hay más de 145 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Idaho. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $8,328 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $7,728.

Desafortunadamente, no hay opciones de becas estatales en Idaho al momento para ayudar con el costo de la escuela privada, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en Directorio de la Escuela de la Diócesis Católica de BoisePrivateschoolreview: Idaho. 

 

Illinois: 

Hay más de 1,660 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Illinois. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $7,545 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $12,212.

En Illinois hay un par de  programas de becas estatales, los cuales pueden ayudar a hacer la matrícula de la escuela privada más asequible para las familias. Los estudiantes de bajo y mediano ingreso pueden ser elegibles para el Programa Invierta en Niños, tome el test elegibilidad aqui,  y puede aplicar al programa aquí. Mientras tanto, el programa de Créditos Fiscales para Gastos de Educación en Illinois les permite a las familias con estudiantes asistiendo a escuelas privadas (o educación en el hogar) reclamar un crédito para gastos calificados, como matrícula o gastos para libros. También existen becas de programas privados

Obtenga más información en Empower Illinois, la Coalición de Escuelas No Públicas de Illinois, la Conferencia Católica de Illinois, y Privateschoolreview: Illinois.

 

Indiana:

Hay más de 650 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Indiana. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $5,489 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias es (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) $10,056. Si la matrícula parece una barrera, es alentador tener en cuenta que casi el 80% de los estudiantes de Indiana son elegibles para un vale o una beca de crédito fiscal para ayudar con los gastos.

Los padres en Indiana pueden tomar deducciones de impuestos por gastos de escuelas privadas (o educación en el hogar). También, a través del programa de Becas de Crédito Fiscal, de Indiana, las familias de bajo y mediano ingreso son elegibles para aplicar para becas (promediando $2,279 en 2019-2020) hacia la matrícula de escuela privada. Las familias de bajo y mediano ingreso pueden también ser elegibles para el Programa de Elección de Becas de Indiana. En 2019-2020, más de 36,000 estudiantes participaron en este programa de cupones. Las familias que participan en el programa de vales pueden incluso usar los fondos para asistir a una de las nuevas escuelas virtuales privadas de Indiana.

En 2021, el estado expandió sus becas existentes y creó un nuevo programa de Cuenta de Ahorros para la Educación (ESA). Este programa comenzará en 2022-2023 y proporcionará fondos educativos flexibles para estudiantes con necesidades especiales.

Obtenga más información en Asociación de Educación No Pública de Indiana,Privateschoolreview: Indiana.

 

Iowa:

Hay más de 240 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Iowa. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $4,505 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $9,189.

En Iowa, las familias pueden deducir impuestos por gastos escolares no públicos de hasta $500 por estudiante. Aunque sí, la cantidad promedio del crédito fiscal es relativamente pequeño, cada poco puede ayudar. También, los niños en Iowa son elegibles para becas a través del Crédito Fiscal de la Organización de Matrícula Escolar siempre que el ingreso familiar no exceda del 400% de las pautas federales de pobreza ($106,000 de ingresos para una familia de cuatro en el 2021)

Obtenga más información en Conferencia Católica en IowaPrivateschoolreview: Iowa.

 

Kansas:

Hay más de 225 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Kansas. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $6,989 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $10,580.

El primer programa de elección de escuela privada de Kansas fue lanzado en 2015 y provee becas para familias de bajo ingreso en escuelas de bajo rendimiento para acceder a otra opción educativa. A partir de 2021, cualquier estudiante de escuela primaria o intermedia que reciba almuerzos gratuitos o de costo reducido es elegible para la beca. Puede tambien haber otras oportunidades de becas disponibles en el estado, por ejemplo, Becas ACE trabaja para proporcionar becas para niños de bajo ingreso en Kansas. 

Obtenga más información en Privateschoolreview: Kansas y EdChoice.

                                                      

Kentucky:

Hay más de 360 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Kentucky. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $6,947 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $8,072.

En 2021, Kentucky creó un programa único de elección de escuelas privadas. A través de él, las familias de bajos ingresos pueden ser elegibles para fondos flexibles para usar en las escuelas públicas o privadas de su elección. Este programa es el primer programa de cuentas de ahorro para la educación del país financiado por donaciones de créditos fiscales.

Actualmente, solo las familias de Kentucky en condados con poblaciones de más de 90,000 pueden usar el programa para la matrícula de escuelas privadas. Estos condados incluyen los condados de Jefferson, Fayette, Kenton, Boone, Campbell, Hardin, Daviess y Warren.

Obtenga más información en Becas de Elección de Escuela, EdChoice KY, la Conferencia Católica de Kentucky, y Privateschoolreview: Kentucky.

 

Louisiana:

Hay más de 400 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Louisiana. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $7,140 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $8,603.

En Louisiana, hay un par de oportunidades para hacer que la escuela privada sea más asequible. Por un lado, las familias que pagan los gastos de la escuela privada pueden reclamar una deducción en sus impuestos. También, las familias con ingresos por debajo de cierto nivel pueden calificar para becas de crédito fiscal; obtenga los detalles aquí. Además, Louisiana tiene dos programas de cupones, uno para estudiantes con necesidades especiales y uno para estudiantes de bajo ingreso.

Obtenga más información en la Federación para Niños de Louisiana y Privateschoolreview: Louisiana.

 

Maine:

Hay más de 150 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Maine. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $15,200 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $30,780.

Maine tiene el segundo programa de elección escolar más antiguo de la nación, promulgado en 1873. A través del Programa de Matrícula de la Ciudad de Maine, los estudiantes que viven en la ciudad sin una escuela pública pueden recibir fondos para asistir a escuelas privadas en otras comunidades. En otros casos, las familias siempre pueden preguntar si hay becas privadas disponibles.

Obtenga más información en el Directorio Escolar Católico de MainePrivateschoolreview: Maine.

 

Maryland:

Hay más de 830 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Maryland. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $12,886 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $16,535.

Maryland tiene un programa de elección para escuela privada, Programa de Ampliación de Opciones y Oportunidades para Estudiantes Hoy (BOOST) , el cual proporciona becas educativas estatales para familias con un determinado nivel de ingresos. Más de 3,000 estudiantes de Maryland aprovecharon este programa en el año escolar 2019-2020.

Obtenga más información en Fondo de Becas para Niños – Baltimore, el Consejo para la Educación Privada Americana de Maryland, la Conferencia Católica de Maryland, y Privateschoolreview: Maryland.

 

Massachusetts:

Hay más de 860 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Massachusetts. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $19,223 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $33,564.

Desafortunadamente, no hay opciones de becas estatales en  Massachusetts al momento, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en la Conferencia Católica de Massachusetts y Privateschoolreview: Massachusetts. 

 

Michigan:

Hay más de 900 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Michigan. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $6,151 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $10,824.

Michigan es uno de los estados más restrictivos constitucionalmente para la elección de escuelas, por lo que actualmente no hay oportunidades de becas estatales que hagan que las escuelas privadas sean más accesibles para las familias de Michigan. Si cree que una escuela privada es la mejor para su hijo pero tiene problemas de financiamiento, puede preguntar si hay becas disponibles con fondos privados. 

Obtenga más información en la Asociación de Escuelas No Públicas de Michigan, la Conferencia Católica de Michigan, y Privateschoolreview: Michigan.

 

Minnesota:

Hay más de 615 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Minnesota. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $6,763 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $11,989.

Mientras que las escuelas privadas cobran matrícula, los padres de Minnesota son elegibles para deducciones de impuestos en gastos educativos, incluyendo los pagos de matrícula de escuelas privadas. Minnesota tiene un programa adicional Crédito para la Educación de K-12  que las familias con ciertos ingresos bajos pueden ser elegibles para solicitar.

Obtenga más información en el Foro de Escuela Independiente de Minnesota, la Conferencia Católica de Minnesota, y Privateschoolreview: Minnesota.

 

Mississippi:

Hay más de 240 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Mississippi. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $5,554 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $6,337.

En Mississippi, hay varios programas de becas estatales para ayudar a familias con necesidades especiales a ganar acceso a escuelas privadas. La Beca de Terapia de Dislexia de Mississippi está diseñada específicamente para ayudar a niños con dislexia a acceder a escuelas privadas con programas de terapia de dislexia. Mientras tanto el programa Becas Nate Rogers  proporciona cupones a ciertas escuelas privadas para estudiantes con necesidades de terapia del habla y lenguaje. Mientras tanto, el programa Igual Oportunidades para Estudiantes con Necesidades Especiales permite a los estudiantes con un IEP recibir parte de sus fondos de educación pública en una cuenta de ahorro, que puede usarse para gastos educativos aprobados, como la matrícula de una escuela privada. 

Obtenga más información en la Asociación de Escuela Independiente de MidSouth y  Privateschoolreview Mississippi.

 

Missouri:

Hay más de 600 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Missouri. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $9,608 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $11,521.

Missouri creó su primer programa de elección de escuela privada, una cuenta de ahorros para la educación, en 2021. Una vez que se lance, el programa proporcionará a las familias fondos de becas flexibles que pueden destinar a asistir a escuelas públicas, autónomas, virtuales, privadas o en la educacion desde el hogar. Todos los estudiantes de Missouri que asistieron a la escuela pública el año anterior o que ingresan a la escuela por primera vez serán elegibles, pero el programa dará prioridad a las familias de bajos ingresos y a los estudiantes con IEP.

Obtenga más información en la Fundación Educacional Hoy y MañanaPrivateschoolreview: Missouri.

 

Montana:

Hay más de  110 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Montana. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $8,050 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $8,117.

 El primer programa de elección de escuela en Montana fue lanzado en 2015. Después de que la Corte Suprema de Montana cuestionó la legalidad del programa, el programa fue llevado a la Corte Suprema de los EE.UU. en un caso histórico, el cual dictaminó constitucional en 2020. Todos los estudiantes entre las edades de cinco y 18 años en Montana son elegibles para solicitar este programa, aunque el valor promedio de la beca ha sido relativamente pequeño ($500) en el pasado. En 2021, el estado expandio el credito fiscal y eso puede incrementar el monto de financiamiento disponible.

Obtenga más información en Montana ACEPrivateschoolreview: Montana.

 

Nebraska:

Hay más de 230 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Nebraska. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $3,554 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $7,798.

Desafortunadamente, no hay opciones de becas estatales en  Nebraska al momento, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en el Fondo de Becas para Niños – Omaha y Privateschoolreview: Nebraska.

 

Nevada:

Hay más de 170 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Nevada. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $10,526 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $12,011.

En 2015, Nevada lanzó un programa de elección escolar que les permite a las familias que se encuentran en o por debajo de 300% de la línea de pobreza federal ($79,500 de ingresos para una familia de cuatro miembros en el 2021) solicitar becas para educación privada.

Si cree que una escuela privada podría ser la mejor opción para su hijo, también puede comunicarse con la escuela sobre si hay becas disponibles con fondos privados. 

Obtenga más información en la Coalición de Opciones Escolares en Nevada, Escuelas Católicas de la Diócesis de RenoPrivateschoolreview: Nevada.

 

New Hampshire:

Hay casi 300 escuelas privadas a través del estado de New Hampshire. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $11,320 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $28,897.

De acuerdo con el Programa de Matrícula de la Ciudad del estado, si su ciudad no tiene una escuela de distrito a su nivel de grado, su distrito pagará para que su hijo asista a una escuela pública o privada dentro o fuera de New Hampshire. A partir de 2021, esto puede incluir escuelas privadas religiosas.

Además, los estudiantes de un hogar donde los ingresos familiares son menos del 300 por ciento del nivel federal de pobreza ($ 79,500 para una familia de cuatro en 2021) pueden postularse al programa de crédito fiscal del estado. Los beneficiarios del programa reciben becas para usar en la matrícula de la escuela privada, tutoría u otros gastos educativos.

Además, en 2021, New Hampshire aprobó un programa de “Cuenta de Libertad Educativa“. Una vez que este programa esté en funcionamiento, los estudiantes de ingresos bajos y medios pueden solicitar recibir fondos para personalizar su educación. Los fondos se pueden usar para elegir una escuela privada, pagar tutorías o libros, y más.

Obtenga más información en el Fondo de Becas para Niños – New Hampshire, Escuelas Católicas de la Diócesis de Manchester, y Privateschoolreview: New Hampshire.

 

New Jersey:

Hay más de 1,350 escuelas privadas a través del estado de New Jersey. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $13,677 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $18,637.

Desafortunadamente, no hay opciones de becas estatales en  New Jersey, pero becas privadas pueden haber disponibles.

Obtenga más información en las Escuelas de la Asociación Católica, el Fondo de Becas Tri-County, y Privateschoolreview: New Jersey.

 

New Mexico:

Hay casi 200 escuelas privadas a través del estado de New Mexico. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $9,001 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $10,388.

No hay opciones de becas estatales en New Mexico, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.  

Obtenga más información en el Consejo para la Educación Privada en América – Capítulo New Mexico, la Escuelas Católicas de la Arquidiócesis de Santa Fe,Privateschoolreview: New Mexico.

 

New York:

Hay más de 1,870 escuelas privadas a través del estado de New York. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $19,423 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $25,176.

Si bien no hay opciones de becas estatales en New York, muchas escuelas privadas, como The Learning Tree Cultural Preparatory School, trabajan con organizaciones que otorgan becas para mantener la matrícula asequible para todas las familias que estén interesadas.

Además, estudiantes con discapacidades en la ciudad de Nueva York pueden ser elegibles para que el Departamento de Educación reembolse la matrícula de la escuela privada cuando no haya una educación pública adecuada que pueda servir a su plan de aprendizaje especial. Según WNYC, “Debido a que los niños con discapacidades tienen derecho a una educación pública gratuita y apropiada según la ley federal, el Departamento de Educación puede recomendar un programa escolar no público si no puede proporcionar los servicios obligatorios para su hijo en su Programa de Educación Individualizado”.

Obtenga más información en el Fondo de Becas para Niños – New York, BISON Fondo de Becas para NiñosFundación Esperanza del Mañana, y Privateschoolreview: New York.

 

North Carolina:

Hay casi 800 escuelas privadas a través del estado de North Carolina. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $9,085 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $10,342.

Hay algunos programas de becas estatales en Carolina del Norte que pueden hacer que las escuelas privadas sean más accesibles para familias de bajos ingresos y para niños con necesidades especiales. Las Becas de Oportunidades del estado proporcionan cupones a niños de bajos ingresos, que pueden usarse para gastos de escuelas privadas. Lea sobre la elegibilidad aquí. Los estudiantes con cierta necesidad especial pueden ser también elegibles para becas de educación especial para asistir a escuelas privadas. Finalmente, North Carolina tiene un segundo programa—un programa de Cuenta de Ahorros para la Educación—para niños con necesidades especiales.

Obtenga más información en el Directorio Escolar de la Diócesis Católica de Raleigh y Privateschoolreview: North Carolina.

 

North Dakota:

Hay más de 60 escuelas privadas a través del estado de North Dakota. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $4,010 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $6,950.

Desafortunadamente, no hay opciones de becas estatales en  North Dakota al momento, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en la Privateschoolreview: North Dakota.

 

Ohio:

Hay más de 1,130 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Ohio. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $6,593 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $10,090.

Ohio ofrece varios programas de financiación estatales. Esos incluyen un programa de becas para estudiantes en el espectro de autismo, un programa de becas para estudiantes con necesidades especiales, y estudiantes de hogares de bajo ingreso. Además, estudiantes en la Escuela Metropolitana en el Distrito de Cleveland son elegibles para becas para asistir a escuelas privadas vecinas. Otro programa es el de Becas de Elección Educativa de Ohio, proporciona cupones para estudiantes asignados a escuelas públicas de bajo rendimiento.

Obtenga más información en el Fondo de Becas en el Noroeste de Ohio y Privateschoolreview: Ohio.

 

Oklahoma:

Hay más de 200 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Oklahoma. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $6,474 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $7,452.

Las escuelas privadas cobran matrícula, pero los estudiantes en Oklahoma en ciertas escuelas de bajo rendimiento o que cumplen con ciertas pautas de ingresos (ingresos menores de $147,075 para una familia de cuatro miembros) pueden calificar para programas de becas estatales. Los estudiantes con discapacidades pueden ser elegibles para Becas Kindsey Nicole Henry. Si cree que una escuela privada puede ser la mejor para su hijo, también puede preguntar si hay otros fondos disponibles a través de fuentes privadas. 

Obtenga más información en la Privateschoolreview: Oklahoma.

 

Oregon:

Hay más de 460 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Oregon. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $8,981 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $12,423.

Desafortunadamente, no hay opciones de becas estatales en  Oregon al momento, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en el Fondo de Becas para Niños-Oregon, el Directorio Escolar Católico de la Diócesis de Portland, y Privateschoolreview: Oregon.

 

Pennsylvania:

Hay más de 1,880 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Pennsylvania. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $10,507 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $16,529.

Algunas familias de Pennsylvania son elegibles para programas de becas estatales. Si vive en una zona escolar de bajo rendimiento y cumple con ciertos requisitos de ingresos, es posible que pueda participar en el Programa de Crédito Fiscal para Oportunidades de Becas. O, niños de familias de bajo o mediano ingreso pueden ser elegibles para el Crédito Fiscal para el Mejoramiento Educativo.

Obtenga más información en Fondo de Becas para Niños-Philadelphia, el Consejo de Educación Privada de América Afiliado de Pennsylvania y Privateschoolreview: Pennsylvania.

 

Rhode Island:

Hay más de 170 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Rhode Island. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $13,125 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $26,663.

Los estudiantes de Rhode Island cuyos ingresos familiares son iguales o inferiores al 250% del nivel de pobreza, son elegibles para becas de escuelas privadas de diferentes cantidades. En 2020-2021, casi 500 estudiantes participaron en el programa y recibieron un promedio de $2,514 en fondos para becas.

Obtenga más información en el Directorio Escolar Católico de la Diócesis de Providence Privateschoolreview: Rhode Island.

 

South Carolina:

Hay más de 420 escuelas privadas a través del estado de South Carolina. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $7,099 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $7,196.

En South Carolina, si su hijo tiene una discapacidad y usted cree que la escuela pública asignada no satisface sus necesidades, puede solicitar el Fondo para Niños con Necesidades Excepcionales y puede recibir una beca para una escuela privada. Fondos adicionales pueden estar disponibles de otras fuentes.

Obtenga más información en el Directorio Escolar Católico de South Carolina y Privateschoolreview: South Carolina.

 

South Dakota:

Hay cerca de 90 escuelas privadas a través del estado de South Dakota. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $3,597 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $6,717.

En South Dakota, las familias con ingresos inferiores al 150% del programa federal de almuerzos gratuitos o de precio reducido ($ 73,538 para una familia de cuatro en 2021) pueden ser elegibles para una beca de escuela privada a través del Programa de Crédito Fiscal Socios en Educación. Financiamiento adicional puede estar disponible de otras fuentes.

Obtenga más información en Privateschoolreview: South Dakota.

                                                 

Tennessee:

Hay cerca de 550 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Tennessee. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $10,226 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $10,537.

En Tennessee, los estudiantes con necesidades especiales pueden ser elegibles para un financiamiento público Cuenta de Educación Individualizada. Además, un programa piloto en el que los estudiantes de Nashville y Memphis cuyas familias cumplen con ciertas pautas de ingresos podrían calificar para un cupón financiado por el estado fue establecido para lanzarlo en el 2021, pero se declaró inconstitucional. Financiamientos adicionales pueden estar disponibles de otras fuentes.

Obtenga más información en la Federación Americana para Niños–Tennessee Publicschoolreview: Tennessee.

 

Texas:

Hay casi 1,900 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Texas. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $9,609 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $11,045.

No hay opciones de becas estatales en Texas, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles para ayudar a las familias a tener acceso a escuelas privadas. 

Obtenga más información en Becas ACE -Texas, el Directorio Escolar Católico de Texas, la Asociación de Escuelas Privadas de Texas, y Privateschoolreview: Texas.

 

Utah:

Hay cerca de 177 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Utah. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $11,118por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $12,808.

En Utah, hay dos programas estatales de becas para ayudar a los niños con necesidades especiales el acceso a la escuela privada: El Programa de Becas para Necesidades Especiales de Carson Smith y el programa Oportunidades de Becas para Necesidades Especiales . Fondos adicionales pueden estar disponibles de otras fuentes.

Obtenga más información en Privateschoolrewiew: Utah.

 

Vermont:

Hay cerca de 130 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Vermont. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $17,671 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $32,117.

Los estudiantes en ciudades específicas de Vermont son elegibles para un programa de matrícula el cual financia su asistencia a escuelas públicas o privadas fuera de sus comunidades. Fondos adicionales pueden estar disponibles de otras fuentes.

Obtenga más información en Previewschoolreview: Vermont.

 

Virginia:

Hay cerca de 1,000 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Virginia. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $12,794 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $16,552.

En Virginia, un programa de becas estatal público está disponible para las familias de Virginia bajo ciertos niveles de ingreso (menos de 300% de la línea de pobreza federal, equivalentemente a $ 79,500 para una familia de cuatro en 2021) y si los estudiantes tienen necesidades especiales.

Obtenga más información en el Consejo para la Educación Privada en Virginia y Privateschoolreview: Virginia.

 

Washington:

Hay cerca de 760 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Washington. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $11,973 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $13,942.

Desafortunadamente, no hay asistencia estatal para la matrícula de escuelas privadas en Washington para ayudar a las familias con el costo de la escuela privada. Pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en la Federación de Escuelas Independientes de Washington Privateschoolreview: Washington.

 

West Virginia:

Hay cerca de 120 escuelas privadas a través del estado de West Virginia. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $6,089 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $6,809.

A partir de 2022, los estudiantes de West Virginia que actualmente están inscritos en una escuela pública o punto de entrar en la guardería pueden ser elegibles para la beca Hope, que permite a las familias utilizan sus impuestos la educación para clases particulares escuela, tutoría, u otros gastos educativos.

Otras becas privadas pueden estar disponibles. Obtenga más información en Privateschoolreview: West Virginia. 

 

Wisconsin:

Hay cerca de 900 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Wisconsin. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $3,998 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $8,370.

Mientras que las escuelas privadas cobran matrícula, cualquier contribuyente en Wisconsin puede deducir el costo de la matrícula de escuela privada. Los estudiantes de Wisconsin con un IEP (Plan de Educación Individualizado) son elegibles para aplicar para el programa de becas de necesidades especiales del estado, el cual puede ser usado hacia la escuela privada.

También, los estudiantes de Milwaukee de familias que cumplen con ciertos requisitos de ingresos, pueden aplicar al Programa de Elección Parental de Milwaukee, y los estudiantes en Racine que cumplan requisitos similares, pueden aplicar al Programa de Elección Parental de Escuela Privada (Racine).  Los estudiantes de bajo ingreso no asignados a los distritos de las Escuelas Públicas de Milwaukee o Unificado Racine pueden también aplicar para un cupón para escuela privada.

Obtenga más información en Privateschoolreview: Wisconsin

 

Wyoming:

Hay cerca de 40 escuelas privadas a través del estado de Wyoming. La matrícula promedio para escuelas privadas en el estado es $3,665 por año en escuelas las escuela elementales e intermediaria, mientras que el promedio de escuelas secundarias (preparatorias o bachillerato, educación de los niveles 9-12) es $14,425.

Desafortunadamente, no hay opciones de becas estatales en  Wyoming al momento, pero becas privadas pueden estar disponibles.

Obtenga más información en Becas ACE -WyomingPrivateschoolreview: Wyoming.

Buscar Escuelas Cercanas

School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels

Datos para Compartir sobre la Escuela Privada

Charter infographics long

Fuente: The School Choice Roadmap, por Andrew Campanella
 

Descargue y comparta datos de estas escuelas aquí.

Escuelas privadas USA

 

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La información en esta guía para escuelas privadas está diseñada para ayudar a las familias que están considerando escuelas privadas en el proceso de hacer decisiones. Nuestra misión es proporcionar a las familias la información clave que necesitan sobre todas las opciones escolares disponibles –pública tradicional, chárter publica, magnet publica, privada, en línea, y en el hogar – de manera que ellos puedan escoger la más adecuada para su hijo. Para más guías sobre escoger otros tipos de escuelas, haga clic aquí.

The Ultimate Guide to Private School

What do Lady Gaga, Denzel Washington, and Ariana Grande have in common? Well, for one thing, they all attended private school at some point during K-12.

Today, there are tens of thousands of private schools across America. From Catholic schools, to independent schools, to schools with special curricula, private schools offer students distinctive learning cultures.

But private education is nothing new. Private or independent schools in America date way back to before the founding of the United States.

What you need to know about private schools.

Get a quick rundown.

Private schools are by nature schools of choice. No student is ever automatically assigned to a private school by any district or agency. Private schools are rooted in the belief that families should be able to choose their child’s learning environment. And, they should have options that match their family’s worldview, religious values, or education philosophy.

“Often the schools in the inner-city are overcrowded and don’t answer the needs of each student. Our school is intimate, family-oriented, and children are comfortable here. We have a very low tuition for an independent school, but many students are from low-income families and are assisted by the Children’s Scholarship Fund.”

Lois Gregory, private school founder in the Bronx

Private schools may be more affordable than you think. A growing number of states have scholarship programs, which can defray the costs of private school. Often, these scholarships prioritize students from low or middle-income families or students with special needs. In addition to state-funded scholarship programs, most individual private schools also provide need-based or academic scholarships to students. Local community organizations sometimes provide scholarships as well, as do national organizations such as the Children’s Scholarship Fund and ACE Scholarships.

The cost of private education varies widely by state and school, with Connecticut having the highest costs and Nebraska having the lowest costs. Of all types of private schools, Catholic parish schools tend to have the lowest tuition costs: The average cost for Catholic elementary schools is about $4,840.

Interested in considering a private school? We’ve put together this ultimate guide to private school to answer your questions, link to tuition assistance programs in your state, and more.

Sign up to learn even more about School Choice in your state!

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FAQ about Private School

 

What are the differences between private schools vs. public schools? Are private schools better?

Public schools are always tuition free, while private schools generate their own funding through tuition, private grants and fundraising. We’ll cover options to lower the cost of private schools later in this guide.

Private schools can set their own admissions standards. Meanwhile, public charter schools must accept all students, and traditional public schools must accept all students within a designated geographic region, depending on the state.

As to which one is better, that depends on your student! It’s important to get as much information as possible to determine what the best learning option is for your individual child.

 

How many students attend private schools?

About 4.7 million K-12 students were enrolled in private schools as of 2021, the most recent year for which private school data is available.

 

Where can I find private school rankings or ratings?

You can find private school rankings or ratings in a few places. GreatSchools has school profiles for most private schools in the country where you can find general information, student demographics, and parent reviews. Niche is another site where you can find information about a private school. Their school profiles have information related to academics, diversity, teachers, college prep, clubs & activities, and sports. Private School Review also hosts profiles of different private schools, sharing information such as school overviews, student body data, academics and faculty information, finances and admission data, and even a list of related schools to help you in your search. Just remember, reviews aren’t everything! You can make the best decision for your child by visiting schools in person or speaking with school staff.

Do private schools have to follow state standards?

Each state sets its own rules for private schools. Many of them require private schools to be accredited, licensed by the state, or approved by the state. Typically, private schools also follow state rules for safety, health, building codes, and the minimum number of school days required.

 

What is the history of private school choice programs or “vouchers”?

Private school choice programs or “school vouchers” have been in existence since 1869. However, the modern school choice movement started in the early 1990’s with the first voucher program designed for lower-income students: the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program. This program started nearly simultaneously with the introduction of public charter schools in neighboring Minnesota and new pathways to homeschooling proliferating around the country. These first programs of the modern school choice era began as a way to give parents more options and freedom in deciding their children’s education, regardless of their income or location. School voucher programs have been found to offer families more options and have the potential to foster diversity, encourage innovation, and contribute to the delivery of high-quality education for all students. As of 2023, there is strong support for education choice, with approximately 75% of parents and two-thirds of the general public endorsing the idea, including ESAs, vouchers, charter schools, and open enrollment.

What are private school vouchers?

A school voucher lets families use all or a portion of the public funding set aside for their children’s education to pay for tuition at a private school. States with vouchers include: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Utah, Vermont, and Wisconsin (and D.C. has a voucher as well!).

 

What are tax-credit scholarships?

According to EdChoice, “Tax-credit scholarships allow taxpayers to receive full or partial tax credits when they donate to nonprofits that provide private school scholarships.” Currently, 22 states have tax-credit scholarship programs either active or launching soon. In each state, the legislature sets a cap on the amount of tax credits that can be distributed. So, the size and availability of tax-credit scholarships varies by state.

Besides tax-credit scholarships, some states offer tax credits and tax deductions to help families afford private school.

 

What are ESAs?

Education savings accounts (ESAs) give parents access to government-authorized savings accounts to pay for a variety of approved education expenses. Depending on the state, approved expenses may include private school tuition and fees, online learning programs, tutoring, transportation, and more. In many cases, parents can combine services from multiple different education options to create a unique path for their child. There are currently active ESA programs in Alabama, Arizona, ArkansasFlorida, GeorgiaIndianaIowaMississippi, Montana, New HampshireNorth CarolinaSouth Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Additionally, in 2021, Missouri created a unique ESA program funded by tax-credit donations (rather than directly by the state).

How to Choose a Private School

We encourage parents to follow the seven steps outlined in The School Choice Roadmap: 7 Steps to Finding the Right School for Your Childa Foreward Indies award finalist, for all school search matters. This thorough, understandable process is designed to help all families identify learning environments that meet their children’s needs. These steps include:

1.Explore your private school options:

The first step you’ll want to take is researching private school options near you. You can use our free Schools Near Me tool to locate private schools near your zip code. Private schools are incredibly diverse, so chances are you’ll be able to consider a variety of religious and non-religious schools.

To learn whether private school students in your state are eligible for special education services, you can explore the state rules we’ve compiled at “How to Continue Your IEP, Even if You Start Homeschooling.”

 

2.Connect:

If there’s a private school that interests you, reach out for more information. You may also want to take a tour or set up a phone call with the school administration. Here are some questions you can ask or consider: What is the school’s special focus? How much is tuition? Does the school provide any transportation? Is after-school care an option? What size are the classes? What sports or extracurricular activities are available?

3.Ask about scholarships

Your first step toward identifying scholarships is to ask the private school you’re considering. Schools are often happy to share information about scholarship opportunities in the local community. You can also check our list below to learn if there are state-run scholarships available in your state.

Some national organizations like the Children’s Scholarship Fund and ACE Scholarships also offer K-12 scholarships. Each year, the Children’s Scholarship Fund and its partner organizations award millions in scholarship awards to students across 19 states.

 

4.Apply:

Once your questions have been answered, you can move forward with applying to the private school if you’d like. Depending on the school, there may be special entrance requirements for your child, like essays, an interview, or a test.

 

5.Get started:

If your child is accepted into the private school, let your previous school know that you will be transferring. You can also make a request if there is anything you need from their end. As a parent/legal guardian, you can ask the school for a copy of your student’s educational record. If your student has any additional services, such as an intervention plan, Individualized Education Plan, 504 plan, or medical response plan, make sure that a copy of this information gets sent to the new school as well!

Private School Options Near Me

Many private schools and nonprofit organizations offer scholarships for students. In addition, 32 states offer official state programs that provide either a scholarship to private school or private school tuition assistance for families. Of these states, 22 states offer official scholarship programs. 9 states offer both scholarship and deduction programs. And,1 state offers only a deduction program.

Click on your state in the list below to learn about private school costs, scholarships, and organizations. You can also find Christian schools near your zip code at the Association of Christian Schools International, and Catholic schools near your zip code at the National Catholic Educational Association.

AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY DC

Tuition assistance may be available from privately funded scholarships
Tuition assistance available from an official state scholarship and deduction program
Tuition assistance available from an official state scholarship program
Tuition assistance available from an official state-run tax deduction or credit

Source: EdChoice, 2023; Independent research by NSCW

Alabama:

There are more than 450 private schools across the state of Alabama. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,680 per year for elementary schools and $8,199 for high schools.

While tuition may seem like a barrier, Alabama has two state programs to support families who wish to attend private schools. As of 2023, children whose household income is below 250% of the federal poverty level, as well as students with Individualized Education Plans, can apply to the Education Scholarship Program. This program provides tax-credit scholarships of up to $10,000 for students to attend a public or private school of their choice. While the program prioritizes students at “priority schools” (schools with a D or F on their state report card), a limited number of students not assigned to priority schools can receive scholarships. Additionally, the Alabama Accountability Act allows families in priority schools to claim an income tax credit for the cost of moving their child to a different public or qualifying private school.

Starting the 2025-2026 school year, students in Alabama will have access to new funding opportunities. The Creating Hope & Opportunity for Our Students’ Education (CHOOSE) Act in Alabama will provide eligible families (students from families that earn up to 300% of the federal poverty level) with a tax-credit education savings account amounting to $7,000 per student for eligible expenses.

Learn more at Alabama Opportunity Scholarship Fund and Private School Review: Alabama.

 

Alaska:

There are more than 50 private schools across the state of Alaska. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,154 for elementary schools and $6,881 for high schools.

Unfortunately, there are no state-run scholarship options in Alaska at present, but private scholarships may be available. Additionally, Alaska has a funding assistance program that can make some private school courses more affordable for families. Essentially, the state sets aside funds in the form of an annual allotment for students enrolled in a state-funded correspondence program. Families can then use their student allotment to request reimbursements for approved educational expenses. Currently, this may include courses at private schools (though not full-time tuition).

Learn more at the Alaska Department of Education,  Catholic Education – Archdiocese of Anchorage, and Private School Review: Alaska.

 

Arizona:

There are more than 450 private schools across the state of Arizona. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $9,619 for elementary schools and $13,766 for high schools.

In Arizona there are currently five state-run scholarship programs, which can help families afford private school tuition. One of these is the nation’s very first tax-credit scholarship program, enacted in 1997. All K-12 students interested in choosing private school are eligible to apply for aid. Arizona launched another individual income tax-credit scholarship program in 2012. Arizona also offers a tax-credit scholarship program focusing on scholarships for low-income children. Fourth, “Lexie’s Law” provides tax-credit scholarships for students with special needs.

Finally, Arizona has an Empowerment Scholarship Accounts program that was adapted in 2022 to expand eligibility to all Arizona students. Participating families can receive scholarships of about $7,000 or more for qualifying educational expenses, including private school tuition, online education, tutoring, transportation, and education therapy.

As of August 2023, more than 63,000 Arizona students are participating in this popular program.

Learn more at Choose A School Arizona,Love Your School,Phoenix Catholic Schools, Arizona School Choice Trust, Arizona Private Education Scholarship Fund, Inc., and Private School Review: Arizona.

 

Arkansas:

There are about 190 private schools across the state of Arkansas. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $5,910 for elementary schools and $6,689 for high schools.

In 2023, Arkansas created a new scholarship program to help families afford nonpublic learning environments. Families who participate in the Arkansas Children’s Educational Freedom Accounts program can have 90% of their child’s state education funding (about $6,600 in 2023-24) deposited in an online account. Parents can then use that funding to pay for approved expenses, like tuition at an eligible private school.

For 2024-25, the program is open to students with disabilities, homeless students, foster students, first-time kindergarteners, students currently in the Succeed Scholarship program, children of active duty military personnel and veterans, children of first responders, and students enrolled in the previous school year in D or F-rated public schools or Level 5 Intensive support school districts. Eligibility to apply will expand to any Arkansas student by 2025! Find all the details in our Arkansas LEARNS Act Explainer.

Arkansas also has a tax-credit scholarship program for low-income children. This Philanthropic Investment in Arkansas Kids Scholarship Program offers scholarships of up to about $6,000 that eligible students can use for private school expenses. You can learn more at ACE Scholarships, which offers partial scholarships for low-income families who wish to attend K-12 private schools.

Learn more at Private School Review: Arkansas.

 

California:

There are about 3,815 private schools across the state of California. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $15,147 for elementary schools and $20,808 for high schools. Tuition can vary quite a lot, and may be much lower in some cases. 

Unfortunately, in California there are not currently any state-run scholarships to help families afford private school tuition. But, privately-funded scholarships may be available.

Learn more at the California Association of Private School Organizations, The BASIC Fund, California Education Foundation, The Guardsmen Scholarship Program, and Private School Review: California.

 

Colorado:

There are about 500 private schools across the state of Colorado. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $11,437 for elementary schools and $15,663 for high schools.

Unfortunately, in Colorado there are no state-run scholarship programs to help families afford private school tuition. However, there may be privately funded scholarships available. ACE Scholarships, for instance, works to provide scholarships for disadvantaged students in Colorado and other states.

Learn more at the Colorado Association of Private Schools, Seeds of Hope, Parents Challenge, and Private School Review: Colorado.

 

Connecticut:

There are more than 400 private schools across the state of Connecticut. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $22,648 for elementary schools and $40,783 for high schools.

Unfortunately, in Connecticut there are no state-run scholarships to help families afford private school tuition. Privately-run scholarships may be available. Additionally, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at CEO Foundation of Connecticut, the Connecticut Catholic Conference, and Private School Review: Connecticut.

 

Delaware:

There are about 130 private schools across the state of Delaware. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,186 for elementary schools and $11,694 for high schools.

Unfortunately, in Delaware there are no state-run scholarship options for private schools, but private scholarships may be available, such as through the Delaware KIDS Fund.

Learn more at the Catholic Diocese of Wilmington and Private School Review: Delaware.

 

Florida:

There are more than 2,500 private schools across the state of Florida. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $9,977 for elementary schools and $11,189 for high schools.

Florida has recently expanded its state-run programs for families who wish to choose private education. As of May 2024, Florida’s existing Family Empowerment Scholarship Educational Opportunity Voucher Program, Florida Tax Credit Program, and Hope Scholarship Program have been converted into education savings account programs open to every child in the state who wishes to enroll in a non-public school option. Participating families receive their education funds (about $8,000) in an online account. They can use those funds for private school tuition, as well as other expenses like online learning costs, part-time tutoring, or an approved course at a local public school! Read all about it in our explainer.

Currently, 88,600 K-12 students are participating in this program.

Florida also offers specific scholarship programs for struggling readersvictims of bullying, and students with an Individualized Education Plan. In 2023, Florida expanded its Family Empowerment Scholarship for Students with Unique Abilities Program to help eliminate a waitlist for students with special needs. In 2024, the scholarship was expanded to include families with pre-K students, and the enrollment cap was raised to more than 72,000 students. Currently, about 71,300 K-12 students with special needs are participating in this program.

An awesome resource for families wanting to learn more about private schools and scholarship opportunities is My Choices in Ed FL. Learn more at the Florida Association of Academic Nonpublic SchoolsStep Up For Students, the Florida Catholic Conference, and Private School Review: Florida.

 

Georgia:

There are about 870 private schools across Georgia. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $11,362 for elementary schools and $12,149 for high schools.

Georgia’s nonpublic schools do charge tuition, but a public school student wishing to switch to a private school can apply for a scholarship. Georgia’s Qualified Education Expense Tax Credit program helps fund these scholarships by allowing donors to receive tax credits when they give to a scholarship organization. To apply for a scholarship, reach out directly to one of the state’s Student Scholarship Organizations listed on the Georgia Department of Education’s website. These organizations manage private school scholarships and can let you know about availability and next steps. In 2022, Georgia legislators strengthened this tax credit program by increasing the cap on donations to it.

The state also has a scholarship program specifically for children with special needs. In 2021, this program expanded to include students with a 504 plan for a variety of conditions (autism, cancer, drug abuse, etc.). Additional funding may be available from other sources.

Starting in 2025, eligible students (those enrolled in the bottom 25% of public schools and those whose families earn less than 400% of the federal poverty line) can apply for a new scholarship that will award up to $6,500 in an online savings account for approved education expenses.

Georgia’s private schools offer unique formats, curricula, and cultures for students to learn in. Learn more at Private School Review: Georgia.

 

Hawaii:

There are more than 130 private schools across the state of Hawaii. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $14,213 for elementary schools and $17,509 for high schools.

Unfortunately, in Hawaii there are not currently any state-run scholarships to help families with the cost of private school, though private scholarships may be available. Additionally, families can save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at the Catholic Diocese of Honolulu School Directory and Private School Review: Hawaii.

 

Idaho:

There are more than 150 private schools across the state of Idaho. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $8,309 for elementary schools and $7,981 for high schools.

Unfortunately, there are no state-run scholarship options in Idaho at present to help with the cost of private school. But, private scholarships may be available. Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at the Catholic Diocese of Boise School Directory and Private School Review: Idaho.

 

Illinois:

There are about 1,600 private schools across the state of Illinois. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,851 for elementary schools and $12,661 for high schools.

Illinois’ Tax Credits for Education Expenses program allows families with students attending a private school (or homeschooling) to claim a credit for qualified expenses, like tuition or book fees. This can help make private school tuition more affordable. Also, the state’s Invest in Kids Program is a scholarship currently serving low-income children, but is set to sunset in 2024 unless renewed.

If you live in Chicago and are looking for private school scholarship assistance, you may wish to check out the Big Shoulders Fund, the Daniel Murphy Scholarship Fund, LINK Unlimited, and HFS Chicago Scholars.

Learn more about Illinois private schools at the Illinois Coalition of Nonpublic Schools, the Catholic Conference of Illinois, and Private School Review: Illinois.

 

Indiana:

There are about 800 private schools across the state of Indiana. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $5,881 for elementary schools and $10,280 for high schools. Thanks to recent expansions, 97% of Hoosier students are now eligible for a scholarship to help with private school expenses.

For example, more than 69,270 students participate annually in Indiana’s Choice Scholarship, which provides vouchers for private school tuition. This program was expanded in 2023; now, nearly all students in the state are eligible to apply.

In 2022, Indiana kicked off an Education Savings Account program to provide flexible educational funding for students with special needs. This program also expanded in 2023 to allow more families to participate. 

Parents in Indiana also have the option of taking tax deductions for private school expenses. Or, through Indiana’s Tax-Credit Scholarship program, low and middle-income families can apply for tax-credit scholarships for private school tuition. 

Learn more at the Indiana Non-Public Education Association, and Private School Review: Indiana.

 

Iowa:

There are about 240 private schools across the state of Iowa. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $4,953 for elementary schools and $9,167 for high schools.

Iowa offers an education savings account program, that gives families funds to use for tuition and other expenses at accredited private schools. More than 18,000 students participated in this program in the 2023-2024 school year! For 2024-2025, students who used Iowa’s ESA program last year, current public school students, and new kindergarteners can apply for the program regardless of their income. Current private school students from families whose income is less than or equal to 400% of the federal poverty level ($124,800 for a family of four in 2024) are now eligible. In total, that means about 94% of students in the state will be eligible this school year!

Additionally, families can take a tax deduction of up to $500 per student for nonpublic school expenses. While the deduction is relatively small, every little bit can help. Also, children in Iowa are eligible for scholarships through the School Tuition Organization Tax Credit as long as their family income doesn’t exceed 400% of the federal poverty level ($111,000 for a family of four in 2022-2023). As of August 2023, more than 18,000 Iowa students have been approved for education savings accounts for this school year!

Learn more at the Iowa Catholic Conference and Private School Review: Iowa.

 

Kansas:

There are more than 220 private schools across the state of Kansas. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $6,978 for elementary schools and $10,462 for high schools.

Kansas’ first private school choice program, launched in 2015, provides scholarships for low-income families to access another education option. In 2023, eligibility for the scholarship was expanded. Now, students from families earning up to 250% of the federal poverty level — about $75,000 a year for a family of four — can apply.

There may also be other private scholarship opportunities available; for example, ACE Scholarships works to provide scholarships for low-income children in Kansas. 

Learn more at Private School Review: Kansas.

                                                      

Kentucky:

There are more than 380 private schools across the state of Kentucky. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $6,941 for elementary schools and $8,077 for high schools.

In 2021, Kentucky created a unique private school choice program. Through it, low-income families would be eligible for flexible funding to use at a public or private schools of their choosing. This program, one of the nation’s first education savings account programs funded by tax-credit donations, was ruled unconstitutional in winter 2022. However, there may be other privately-funded scholarship opportunities available.

Learn more at EdChoice KY, the Catholic Conference of Kentucky, and Private School Review: Kentucky.

 

Louisiana:

There are about 400 private schools across the state of Louisiana. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,344 for elementary schools and $8,708 for high schools.

In Louisiana, there are a couple opportunities in place to make private school more affordable. For one, families who pay private school expenses can claim a deduction on their taxes. Currently, families can deduct up to $5,000 for tuition and fees from their total taxable income; in 2024, that amount will increase to $6,000. Also, families with incomes below a certain level can qualify for tax-credit scholarships.

Additionally, Louisiana has two voucher programs, one for students with special needs and one for low-income students. And since 2018, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at Private School Review: Louisiana.

 

Maine:

There are about 150 private schools across the state of Maine. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $14,704 for elementary schools and $30,253 for high schools.

Maine has the nation’s second oldest school choice program, enacted in 1873. Through Maine’s Town Tuitioning Program, students who live in towns without a public school can receive funding to attend private schools in other communities. You can find an interactive map of Maine’s town tuition choices at the Maine Policy Institute.

As of June 2022, the Supreme Court ruled in Carson v. Makin that Maine’s town tuitioning program cannot exclude religious private schools from the options parents could choose through the program. However, currently only one religious school is approved to participate.

Families can also inquire into whether private scholarships are available, such as through the Maine Children’s Scholarship Fund.

Learn more at the Maine Catholic School Directory, Maine Community Foundation, and Private School Review: Maine.

 

Maryland:

There are more than 800 private schools across the state of Maryland. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $13,523 for elementary schools and $17,815 for high schools.

Maryland has one private school choice program, the Broadening Options and Opportunities for Students Today (BOOST) Program, which provides state-run educational scholarships for families under a certain income level. More than 3,200 Maryland students took advantage of this program in the 2021-2022 school year.

Additional support may be available. For example, the Baltimore Educational Scholarship Trust partners with 18 private schools to provide admissions and financial support to high-achieving African American students in the Baltimore area. Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts. 

Learn more at Children’s Scholarship Fund-Baltimore, the Abell Foundation, Knott Scholarship Funds, Partners in Excellence, the Maryland Council for American Private Education, the Maryland Catholic Conference, and Private School Review: Maryland.

 

Massachusetts:

There are more than 850 private schools across the state of Massachusetts. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $21,946 for elementary schools and $37,151 for high schools.

Unfortunately, there are no state-run scholarship options in Massachusetts at present, but private scholarships may be available, such as through the Catholic Schools Foundation. Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at the Massachusetts Catholic Conference and Private School Review: Massachusetts.

 

Michigan:

There are about 900 private schools across the state of Michigan. Tuition costs vary widely, but the average in the state is $6,547 for private elementary schools and $11,405 for private high schools.

Michigan is one of the most constitutionally restrictive states for school choice, so there are currently no state-run scholarship opportunities that make private school more accessible to Michigan families. If you think a private school is best for your child but have funding concerns, you can ask whether there are any privately funded scholarships available.

Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at the Michigan Association of Non-Public Schools, the Michigan Catholic Conference, and Private School Review: Michigan.

 

Minnesota:

There are more than 600 private schools across the state of Minnesota. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,181 for elementary schools and $13,360 for high schools.

While private schools do charge tuition, Minnesota parents are eligible for tax deductions on educational expenses, including private school tuition payments.  Minnesota has an additional K-12 Education Credit program that families under a certain income may be eligible to apply for.

Learn more at the Minnesota Independent School Forum, the Minnesota Catholic Conference, and Private School Review: Minnesota.

 

Mississippi:

There are more than 230 private schools across the state of Mississippi. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $5,951 for elementary schools and $6,611 for high schools.

In Mississippi, there are several state-run scholarship programs helping families with special needs gain access to private schools. The Mississippi Dyslexia Therapy Scholarship is designed specifically to help children with dyslexia access private schools with dyslexic therapy programs. Meanwhile, the Nate Rogers Scholarship program provides vouchers to certain private schools for students with speech-language therapy needs. Meanwhile, the Equal Opportunity for Students with Special Needs program allows students with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) to receive some of their public education funding in a savings account, which can be used for approved education expenses, like private school tuition.

Learn more at the MidSouth Association of Independent Schools and Private School Review: Mississippi.

 

Missouri:

There are more than 670 private schools across the state of Missouri. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $9,987 for elementary schools and $12,434 for high schools.

In 2024, the MOScholars education savings account program in Missouri was expanded statewide. This program offers flexible scholarship funds that can be used by families to attend eligible public, charter, virtual, private, or homeschooling. Additionally, families can use the funds for educational therapy or school transportation. To be eligible for this program, students must have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) or be from families earning up to 300 percent of the federal free-and-reduced-price lunch program.

Learn more at the Today and Tomorrow Educational Foundation and Private School Review: Missouri.

 

Montana:

There are more than 120 private schools across the state of Montana. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $8,068 for elementary schools and $9,063 for high schools.

Montana’s first school choice program, a scholarship program funded by tax-credited donations, was launched in 2015. After the program’s legality was challenged by the Montana Supreme Court, the program was taken to the U.S. Supreme Court in a landmark case, which ruled it constitutional in 2020. All students between the ages of five and 18 in Montana are eligible to apply for this program which was expanded in 2023. The average scholarship size received is about $2,200.

Starting in 2024, students with special needs will be eligible for a new education savings account scholarship. Participating families will receive about $6,800 in an online account for their child. These funds can be flexibly used for private school tuition, textbooks, curriculum, tutoring, education therapies, transportation or other approved learning expenses.

Learn more at ACE Montana and Private School Review: Montana.

 

Nebraska:

There are more than 220 private schools across the state of Nebraska. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $3,610 for elementary schools and $7,880 for high schools.

Under a new model, eligible families may be eligible for a private school voucher under the Opportunity Scholarship Act, which can be used for private school expenses, including tuition and transportation. Low-income families will receive priority (families that earn up to 300% of the federal poverty level), students with a parent in the armed forces, and students already receiving an education scholarship under the Opportunity Scholarship Act may be eligible for a voucher amounting up to $5,000.

Additionally, the federal government does allow parents in all 50 states to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at Children’s Scholarship Fund-Omaha and Private School Review: Nebraska.

 

Nevada:

There are more than 170 private schools across the state of Nevada, and more than 20,000 private school students. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,544 for elementary schools and $11,407 for high schools. Private schools in Nevada provide the same number of days of instruction and private school teachers must hold a teacher’s license or meet another requirement.

In 2015, Nevada launched a school choice program that enables families at or below 300% of the federal poverty line ($83,250 for a family of four in 2022-2023) to apply for scholarships for private education. Do you think a private school could be the best fit for your child? You can also reach out to the school about whether any privately funded scholarships are available.

Learn more at Catholic Schools of the Diocese of Reno and Private School Review: Nevada.

 

New Hampshire:

There are more than 280 private schools across the state of New Hampshire. The Granite State’s private schools come in all shapes and forms. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $11,601 for elementary schools and $28,426 for high schools.

According to the state’s Town Tuitioning Program, if your town doesn’t have a district school at your grade level, your district will pay for your child to attend a public or private school in or outside of New Hampshire. As of 2021, this may include religious private schools.

In addition, students from a household where family income is less than 300 percent of the federal poverty level ($90,000 for a family of four in 2023) can apply to the state’s tax-credit program. Recipients of the program receive scholarships to use for private school tuition, tutoring, or other educational expenses.

Since 2021, New Hampshire also offers a “Education Freedom Account” program. This flexible program allows low and middle-income students to receive education grants to customize their learning. The funds can be used to choose a private school, pay for tutoring or books, put toward educational therapy, and more. As of 2023, this program is open to students from a household where family income is less than 350 percent of the federal poverty level ($105,000 for a family of four in 2023.)

Learn more at the Children’s Scholarship Fund, Catholic Schools of the Diocese of Manchester, and Private School Review: New Hampshire.

 

New Jersey:

There are more than 1,300 private schools across the state of New Jersey. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $14,234 for elementary schools and $18,871 for high schools. You can find a complete list at the New Jersey Department of Education. Additionally, families in Newark, New Jersey may be interested in learning about private schools (as well as other types of schools) at My Schools Newark.

Unfortunately, there are no state-run scholarship options in New Jersey. However, private scholarships may be available, such as through the Tri-County Scholarship Fund, the Student Partner Alliance, and The Wight Foundation. You can find additional tips for financing private school at New Jersey Family.

Learn more at Catholic Partnership Schools, the Tri-County Scholarship Fund, and Private School Review: New Jersey.

 

New Mexico:

There are more than 180 private schools across the state of New Mexico. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $8,770 for elementary schools and $10,324 for high schools.

There are no state-run scholarship options in New Mexico, but private scholarships may be available. Also, parents can save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts. You can read about recent changes to New Mexico’s state-sponsored 529 education savings plan at The Education Plan website.

Learn more at the Council for American Private Education- New Mexico Chapter, the Archdiocese of Santa Fe Catholic Schools, and Private School Review: New Mexico.

 

New York:

There are more than 1,800 private schools across the state of New York. Overall the average tuition for private schools in the state is $20,899 for elementary schools and $26,418 for high schools.

While there are no state-run scholarship options in New York, many private schools, such as The Learning Tree Cultural Preparatory School, work with scholarship-granting organizations to keep tuition affordable for all families who are interested. In fact, there are more than 200 New York City private schools with an average annual tuition of $6,065.

Additionally, New York City students with disabilities may be eligible to have private school tuition reimbursed by the Department of Education when there is not an appropriate public education able to serve their special learning plan. According to WNYC, “Because children with disabilities are entitled to a free and appropriate public education under federal law, the Education Department may recommend a nonpublic school program if it is unable to provide the services mandated for your child in his or her Individualized Education Program.”

Learn more about private school opportunities at the Children’s Scholarship Fund – New York,BISON Children’s Scholarship Fund, Tomorrow’s Hope Foundation, Advocates for Children of New York’s Guide to Special Education, Inner-City Scholarship Fund, Futures in Education, Oliver Scholars, Prep for Prep, Student Sponsor Partners, and Private School Review: New York.

North Carolina:

There are more than 800 private schools across the state of North Carolina. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $9,056 for elementary schools and $10,066 for high schools.

North Carolina offers an expansive private school choice program that makes choosing a private school more accessible to all families, especially low-income families. Starting in 2024, any family in the state can apply for an Opportunity Scholarship, which can be used for private school expenses, including tuition and transportation. Low-income families will receive priority for scholarships and the largest scholarship amounts, up to about $7,400. You can find all the details in our full explainer. Carolina also offers flexible scholarships for students with special learning needs through the North Carolina Personal Education Students Accounts for Children with Disabilities Program (ESA+).

For a deep data dive into North Carolina’s private schools, check out this analysis of the state’s private school landscape.

Learn more at the Catholic Diocese of Raleigh School Directory and Private School Review: North Carolina.

 

North Dakota:

There are more than 50 private schools across the state of North Dakota. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $4,010 for elementary schools and $6,950 for high schools.

Unfortunately, there are no state-run scholarship options in North Dakota at present, but private scholarships may be available. Also, since 2018, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at Private School Review: North Dakota.

 

Ohio:

There are more than 1,200 private schools across the state of Ohio. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,113 for elementary schools and $10,681 for high schools.

But if you’re assuming private school isn’t affordable, think again. In 2023, Ohio’s Educational Choice Scholarship Program expanded: now every child in the state is eligible to apply. This program provides vouchers (worth up to $6,165 for K-8 students and up to $8,407 for 9-12 students) for families who wish to choose private school.

Ohio offers several other state-run funding programs too. These include scholarship programs for students with autism and students with special needs. Both the Autism Scholarship Program and Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program expanded in 2023 to become available to even more families. Ohio’s Cleveland Scholarship Program, originally designed for families in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District who wished to choose private school, expanded in 2023 as well.

Plus, Ohio offers a scholarship program funded by tax-credit donations. Open to all students, this program gives priority to low-income families. Finally, families enrolled in certain private schools or homeschooling are eligible for a tax credit.

Learn more at the Northwest Ohio Scholarship Fund and Private School Review: Ohio.

 

Oklahoma:

There are more than 200 private schools across the state of Oklahoma. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $6,766 for elementary schools and $8,052 for high schools.

Oklahoma students in certain underperforming schools or who meet certain income guidelines (income at or less than $154,014 for a family of four in 2022-2023) can qualify for state-run scholarship programs. Students with disabilities may be eligible for the Lindsey Nicole Henry Scholarship. Think a private a private school is best for your child but have funding concerns? You can also ask if funding is available through private sources.

In 2023, lawmakers passed the Oklahoma Parental Tax Credit Act. Starting December 1, 2023, all students enrolling in an accredited private school can apply for a refundable income tax credit. The credit will cover $5,000-$7,500 of private school tuition costs. Get all the details in our full explainer.

Learn more at Private School Review: Oklahoma.

 

Oregon:

There are more than 460 private schools across the state of Oregon. The average tuition for private schools in the state is 9,485 for elementary schools and $12,011 for high schools.

Unfortunately, there are no state-run scholarship options in Oregon at present, but private scholarships may be available. Also, parents can save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at Children’s Scholarship Fund-Oregon, the Archdiocese of Portland Catholic School Directory, and Private School Review: Oregon.

 

Pennsylvania:

There are more than 2,000 private schools across the state of Pennsylvania. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,477 for elementary schools and $16,145 for high schools.

Some Pennsylvania families are eligible for state-run scholarship programs. If you live in a low-achieving school zone and meet certain income requirements, you may be able to participate in the state’s Opportunity Scholarship Tax Credit Program. Or, children from low or middle income families may be eligible for the Educational Improvement Tax Credit. These programs received a boost in Pennsylvania’s fiscal budget for 2022-2023, allowing an estimated additional 31,000 students to receive school choice scholarships.

Learn more about private schools and scholarship opportunities at Children’s Scholarship Fund-Philadelphia, CEO-America, Business Leadership Organized for Catholic Schools (BLOCS), the Extra Mile Education Foundation, the Pennsylvania Affiliate of the Council on American Private Education and Private School Review: Pennsylvania.

 

Rhode Island:

There are about 170 private schools across the state of Rhode Island. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $13,492 for elementary schools and $27,082 for high schools.

Rhode Island students whose family incomes are at or below 250% of the poverty level ($69,375 for a family of four in 2022-2023) are eligible for private school scholarships of varying amounts. In 2022, nearly 500 students participated in the program and received an average of $2,890 in scholarship funding.

Learn more at the Diocese of Providence Catholic School Directory, the Rhode Island Scholarship Alliance, and Private School Review: Rhode Island.

 

South Carolina:

There are more than 420 private schools across the state of South Carolina. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,869 for elementary schools and $7,921 for high schools.

In South Carolina, if your child has a disability and you believe the assigned public school does not meet his or her needs, you can apply to the Exceptional Needs Children Fund and may be able to receive a scholarship toward private school. Additionally, the state offers a refundable educational credit program where parents may receive a tax credit for learning expenses for special needs students.

Also, starting in 2024, low-income families will be able to apply to receive up to $6,000 of flexible education funding for private school tuition and other approved expenses through a new scholarship program. Applications for the 2024-2025 school year are open and will close on March 15, 2024. You can learn if you are eligible to apply in our full explainer.

Learn more at the South Carolina Catholic School Directory and Private School Review: South Carolina.

 

South Dakota:

There are more than 80 private schools across the state of South Dakota. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $3,837 for elementary schools and $6,369 for high schools.

In South Dakota, families with income below 150% of the federal free and reduced-price lunch program ($77,006 for a family of four in 2022) may be eligible for a private school scholarship through the Partners in Education Tax Credit Program. Currently, about 41% of South Dakota families are eligible for the scholarship. In 2022, a bill passed making students in foster care eligible for the program and increasing the scholarship cap. Additional funding may be available from other sources.

Learn more at Private School Review: South Dakota.

 

Tennessee:

There are more than 550 private schools across the state of Tennessee. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,444 for elementary schools and $11,086 for high schools.

In Tennessee, students with special needs may be eligible for a publicly funded Individualized Education Account. In 2022, this program was expanded to include students with dyslexia.

Also, low-income and middle-income students zoned to attend a Shelby County District school, Hamilton County school, or Metro Nashville Public School may qualify for a state-funded voucher to attend a private school of their choice. Families can find an enrollment form and more details at the Tennessee Department of Education. Additional funding may be available from other sources.

Learn more at Private School Review: Tennessee. You can also find information about private schools at the online dashboard of the Tennessee Comptroller’s Office.

 

Texas:

There are about 2,000 private schools across the state of Texas. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,076 for elementary schools and $11,515 for high schools.

There are no state-run scholarship options in Texas, but private scholarships may be available to help families access private school. Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at ACE Scholarships-Texas, the Texas Catholic School Directory, the Texas Private Schools Association, and Private School Review: Texas.

 

Utah:

There are more than 180 private schools across the state of Utah. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $10,962 for elementary schools and $13,036 for high schools.

In Utah, there are two state-run scholarship programs to help children with special needs access private school: The Carson Smith Special Needs Scholarship Program and the Special Needs Opportunity Scholarship program, which you can read more about at Children First Education Fund.

A new scholarship open to all Utah students has launched for the 2024-2025 school year: the Utah Fits All Scholarship Program. This education savings account program will give $8,000 in flexible education funding to families choosing to enroll in a nonpublic school option, like private school. Besides private school tuition, families may be able to use the funds for other customized learning needs, including tutoring services, educational software, individual classes at a local public school, or dual enrollment at a technical college.

Learn more at Private School Review: Utah.

 

Vermont:

There are about 130 private schools across the state of Vermont. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $18,494 for elementary schools and $32,155 for high schools.

Students in specific Vermont towns that do not have a public school for their grade are eligible for a tuitioning program., This program funds their attendance at a public or even private school outside of their community.

In 2022, the Supreme Court clarified that faith-based private schools are eligible to participate in this program. Schools that choose to participate in this town tuitioning program cannot deny enrollment to students based on special-education needs. For the 2022-2023 school year, Vermont approved 15 private religious schools for participation in the program. Unfortunately, Vermont’s 2023 state budget includes a ban on adding any more independent schools to the current approved list of participants.

Additional funding may be available from other sources, and the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at Private School Review: Vermont.

 

Virginia:

There are more than 1,000 private schools across the state of Virginia. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $13,434 for elementary schools and $17,265 for high schools.

In Virginia, a state-run scholarship program is available to students with family incomes below 300% of the federal poverty level ($83,250 for a family of four in 2022-2023) and students with special needs.

Also, the federal government does allow parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at the Virginia Council for Private Education and Private School Review: Virginia.

 

Washington:

There are about 750 private schools across the state of Washington. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $14,060 for elementary schools and $12,392 for high schools.

Unfortunately, there are no state-run private school tuition assistance programs in Washington to help families with the cost of private school. But, private scholarships may be available. Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at the Washington Federation of Independent Schools, the Fulcrum Foundation, and Private School Review: Washington.

 

West Virginia:

There are more than 100 private schools across the state of West Virginia. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $6,358 for elementary schools and $6,617 for high schools.

In 2021, West Virginia created the Hope Scholarship program, which allows students currently enrolled in public school or about to enter kindergarten to use their education tax dollars for private school tuition, tutoring, educational therapy, or other learning expenses. More than 5,000 students have been awarded Hope Scholarships for the 2023-2024 school year. The Hope Scholarship amount is currently $4,488.

In 2023, West Virginia passed a law making it easier for Hope Scholarship students and other non-traditional students to participate in extracurriculars at their local public school.

Learn more at Private School Review: West Virginia. 

 

Wisconsin:

Wisconsin’s more than 900 private schools come in all shapes and sizes. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $4,083 for elementary schools and $8,481 for high schools.

While private schools do charge tuition, any Wisconsin taxpayer can deduct the cost of private school tuition. Wisconsin students with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) are eligible to apply for the state’s special needs scholarship program, which can be used toward private school.

Also, Milwaukee students from families who meet certain income requirements can apply to the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program, and students in Racine who meet similar requirements can apply to the Racine Parental Choice Program.  Low-income students not assigned to the Milwaukee Public Schools or Racine Unified districts may also be able to apply for a private school voucher. More than 52,000 students statewide use Wisconsin’s vouchers program to find a good private school fit. In fact, students participating in Wisconsin’s private school choice programs will soon receive a funding boost: A bill passed in 2023 increases the amount of funding that students receive in 2023-2024 and 2024-2025.

Learn more at Private School Review: Wisconsin.

 

Wyoming:

There are more than 30 private schools across the state of Wyoming. The average tuition for private schools in the state is $7,060 for elementary schools and $19,067 for high schools.

Starting in the 2025-2026 school year, students in Wyoming will have access to new funding opportunities. Wyoming has passed a bill known as the Wyoming Education Savings Account Act, which creates an ESA program to provide eligible families (students from families that earn up to 150% of the federal poverty level) with an online savings account amounting to $6,000 to help pay for a range of eligible expenses.

Also, the federal government allows parents to save for K-12 private school tuition using tax-preferred 529 savings accounts.

Learn more at ACE Scholarships-Wyoming and Private School Review: Wyoming.

Washington, D.C.

There are about 100 private schools in the District of Columbia. The average tuition for private schools in D.C. is $27,647 for elementary schools and $30,948 for high schools.

Families who receive food stamps or meet certain income limits ($51,338 for a family of four in 2021) may qualify for the District’s Opportunity Scholarship Program. Students in low-performing schools, or whose siblings use Opportunity Scholarships, receive preference. The establishment of the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program was recently the subject of a feature film, Miss Virginia!

Additional funding may be available from other sources. Learn more at the Association of Independent Maryland & DC Schools, The Shepherd Foundation, Black Student Fund, and Latino Student Fund.

Shareable Facts about Private School


The information in this ultimate guide to private school is designed to help families who are considering private schools in their decision-making process. Our mission is to provide families with the information they need about all the school options available – traditional public, public charter, public magnet, private, online, and at home – so they can choose the right fit for their child. Read more guides about choosing other types of schools.

Imagine enviar a sus hijos a una escuela que parece hecha a la medida de su entusiasmo por la música o la ciencia. Imagine encontrar una escuela para sus hijos que despierte su curiosidad por la medicina o el arte. Imagine una escuela centrada en un gran tema, un tema que se utiliza como “gancho” para alentar la enseñanza a los estudiantes sobre cada tema.

Existen más de 4.000 de estas escuelas únicas en todos los Estados Unidos ¿Y adivine qué? No son escuelas privadas de élite. Son escuelas públicas de enseñanza gratuita. ¡Son escuelas magnet públicas!

Las escuelas magnet son escuelas públicas gratuitas que se centran en temas particulares, como las artes escénicas o la ciencia médica. Si le interesa aprender más, esta guía es para usted. Haga clic en los siguientes botones para encontrar una definición de escuela magnet, respuestas a sus preguntas sobre las escuelas magnet, un enlace a los recursos de su estado y mucho más.

[bctt tweet=”Escuelas magnet ¿Ha oído hablar de ellas? @SchoolChoiceWk creó esta guía para difundir información sobre estas escuelas públicas gratuitas que a menudo pasan desapercibida” url = “https://schoolchoiceweek.com/escuelas-publicas-magnet/” via = “no”]

 

¿Te gusta lo que ves? ¡Ingrese su correo electrónico para obtener más recursos educativos gratuitos!

¿Es esta la primera vez que navega por el sistema educativo en los Estados Unidos? Si es así, es esencial saber que la educación K-12 es obligatoria, gratuita y abierta a todos los niños de este país, independientemente de los ingresos familiares, el estado migratorio o la religión.

Cada familia tiene una escuela pública local asignada a la que es gratis asistir, pero en la mayoría de los lugares usted puede elegir entre otras escuelas públicas gratuitas como escuelas chárter, escuelas magnet o escuelas en línea; o seleccionar una escuela privada o educación en el hogar. Encuentre más información sobre la estructura del sistema educativo aquí y algunas preguntas frecuentes para padres migrantes de primera generación que buscan opciones de elección de escuela aquí.

 

Preguntas Frecuentes Acerca de la Escuela Magnet

¿Qué es una escuela magnet?

 

Las escuelas magnet son escuelas públicas gratuitas operadas por distritos escolares que permiten a los niños centrarse en un tema de aprendizaje específico, como el STEM, la ciencia médica o las artes escénicas. En una escuela magnet, todas las materias se enseñan a través de los lentes del tema específico de la escuela. En una escuela magnet centrada en las artes, por ejemplo, los estudiantes aprenderán todas las clases requeridas (matemáticas, inglés, etc.). Pero esas clases obligatorias pueden incluir proyectos o debates relacionados con las artes, y los estudiantes también tomarán una variedad de clases de arte. Cuando los profesores y los estudiantes comparten una pasión común por una asignatura, se puede crear una vibrante comunidad de aprendizaje.

Encontrar una definición de escuela magnet puede ser confuso. Por ejemplo, algunas escuelas públicas tradicionales tienen programas magnet por los que un subconjunto de estudiantes opta. Aunque esas escuelas no son escuelas magnet en el sentido más completo, sus programas magnet pueden ofrecer el beneficio de enfocarse en un tema en particular.

Muchos de nosotros vamos a la universidad y no sabemos realmente lo que queremos hacer; podemos cambiar nuestra especialidad dos o tres veces. A veces tener la opción de elegir en la escuela secundaria, incluso en la primaria, aclara eso para los estudiantes. O, simplemente los expone a otra área que de otra manera no verían en una escuela tradicional. – Agnes Perry, Escuela Secundaria DeBakey para Profesiones de la Salud

estudiantes celebran la elección de la escuela

 

¿Quién puede asister a una escuela magnet? ¿Cómo se entra?

Los estudiantes rara vez, si es que alguna vez, son asignados automáticamente a una escuela magnet.  Padres de familia pueden elegir solicitar una escuela magnet y, si son aceptados, asistir a ella en lugar de su escuela de zona o la escuela más cercana.

A veces, las escuelas magnet son tan populares que dependen de loterías aleatorias para determinar admisión. Si este es el caso de la escuela magnet en la que está interesado, puede presentar una solicitud a la escuela antes de la fecha límite. Entonces, se le notificará si hay espacio y su hijo ha sido aceptado. Tenga en mente que las familias con hermanos que ya asisten a la escuela pueden ser priorizadas.

Además, algunas escuelas magnet pueden tener requisitos de elegibilidad. Por ejemplo, una escuela magnet con un enfoque musical puede requerir que los estudiantes hagan una audición. Los pasos serán claramente definidos por cada escuela o programa magnet individual.

 

¿Cuándo se puede aplicar para una escuela magnet?

Los distritos tienen diferentes fechas límite para las solicitudes de las escuelas magnet, así que recomendamos que lo comprueben con su distrito local. Pero, en nuestra experiencia, la ventana de aplicación de las escuelas magnet puede ocurrir sorprendentemente pronto, especialmente en lugares donde las escuelas magnet son populares. A menudo, la ventana de solicitud para el próximo año escolar comienza tan pronto como en noviembre.

 

¿Cuánto cuesta una escuela magnet?

Es importante destacar que las escuelas magnet son escuelas públicas y, por lo tanto, cualquier estudiante puede asistir gratuitamente. Como todas las escuelas públicas, las escuelas magnet son financiadas por los contribuyentes. Dado que las escuelas magnet son escuelas públicas, el transporte suele ser gratuito y también se proporciona. Puede explorar el gasto por alumno para las escuelas públicas, incluidas las escuelas magnet, en Project Nickel.

 

¿Por qué escoger una escuela magnet?

Las escuelas magnet públicas ofrecen una oportunidad emocionante para que los niños aprendan en un lugar donde están inmersos en un tema que les encanta. Por ejemplo, el Dr. Michael Lofton, fundador de una escuela magnet en South Carolina nos dijo, “Los estudiantes realmente tienden a profundizar un poco más en el estudio si lo disfrutan más y es algo con lo que quieren relacionarse”.

Cómo elegir una escuela magnet

Animamos a los padres a seguir los siete pasos descritos en The School Choice Roadmap (Ruta para la Elección de la Escuela) para todos los asuntos de búsqueda de escuelas. Este proceso exhaustivo y comprensible está diseñado para ayudar a todas las familias a identificar los entornos de aprendizaje que satisfagan las necesidades de sus hijos. Estos pasos incluyen:

1. Explore sus opciones de escuelas magnet:

¿Hay una escuela magnet cerca de usted? El primer paso que querrá dar para averiguarlo es investigar sus opciones. Puede empezar utilizando nuestra herramienta para encontrar escuelas cerca de usted, también puede revisar nuestra lista estatal de recursos de escuelas magnet a continuación. Además le sugerimos que busque en Google su distrito escolar y las “escuelas magnet” o “magnet schools” para obtener la información mas reciente sobre su localidad. Y, dado que las escuelas magnet se centran en un tema en particular, deberá considerar cuidadosamente cuáles son los intereses y aptitudes de su hijo.

 

2. Contacte la(s) escuela(s) que le interesan:

Si hay una escuela magnet que le interese, busque más información. Quizás también quiera hacer una visita a la escuela. Si decide visitar la escuela, aquí hay algunas preguntas que puede hacer: ¿Cuándo puede aplicar? (Las escuelas magnet suelen tener una fecha límite específica para las solicitudes). ¿Hay algún requisito de entrada? (Alrededor del 75% de las escuelas magnet no tienen requisitos de ingreso. Pero, otras sí tienen audiciones o requisitos especiales). ¿Cuál es su enfoque de la educación? ¿Hay una lotería para decidir qué estudiantes son aceptados? ¿Proporcionan transporte? (La mayoría de las escuelas magnet, pero no todas, proporcionan transporte).

 

3. Aplique:

Una vez que sus preguntas hayan sido contestadas, puede seguir adelante con la solicitud. Después de completar una solicitud, normalmente se le notifica de su estado por correo electrónico o correo postal.

Si su estudiante es seleccionado, es posible que tenga que “aceptar” oficialmente su lugar en un plazo determinado. La escuela te proporcionará información sobre lo que necesitan antes de que te unas a la escuela.

Su estudiante puede recibir un estatus de “piscina alternativa”, “lista de espera” o “waitlist”. Esto significa que su hijo puede recibir un asiento si se abre uno en las próximas semanas.

Si la escuela magnet no tiene un lugar para su hijo este año, es posible que tenga que elegir otra escuela. Sabemos que esto puede ser decepcionante. Pero ¡No se desanime! Puede intentarlo de nuevo el próximo año si todavía está interesado.

 

4. Empiece:

Si su hijo es aceptado en la escuela magnet, puede dejarle saber a su escuela anterior que será transferido. También puede preguntarles si hay algo que necesite hacer por su parte. Como padre/tutor legal, puede pedir a la escuela anterior una copia del expediente académico de su hijo. Si su estudiante tiene algún servicio adicional, como un plan de intervención, un plan de educación individualizado, un plan 504 o un plan de respuesta médica, ¡asegúrense de que también se envíe una copia de esta información a la nueva escuela!

 

Maestros-en-Georgia-posan-con-bufandas-de-elección-de-escuela

 

Opciones de escuelas magnet en su estado

Hay más de 4.300 escuelas magnet en todo el país que atienden a 3,5 millones de niños. Además, hay miles de programas “magnet” dentro de las escuelas públicas tradicionales en todo el país. Las escuelas magnet, las escuelas temáticas o los programas magnet están permitidos en cada uno de los 50 estados y en el Distrito de Columbia. En algunos estados, como se indica en el mapa de abajo, no hay escuelas magnet independientes, pero hay programas magnet disponibles en las escuelas públicas tradicionales.

¿Tiene su estado escuelas magnet? Consulte la guía para padres de su estado o desplácese hacia abajo para saber si su estado tiene escuelas magnet. Aunque hemos preparado un lugar para que empiece, también le sugerimos que compruebe su distrito local para ver las opciones de escuelas magnet.

[custom_us_map type=”color” sector=”magnet”]

Fuente: Magnet Schools of America, 2019

Alabama:

Alabama tiene más de treinta escuelas magnet. Por ejemplo, el Distrito Escolar Público del Condado de Mobile (el distrito escolar más grande de Alabama) ofrece una lista de sus ocho escuelas magnet aquí. El distrito explica, “Nuestras escuelas selectas encarnan la creencia de que los estudiantes altamente motivados y enfocados académicamente tienen intereses y talentos que se cultivan mejor en un programa escolar magnet. Nuestras escuelas magnet han enfocado los temas y alineado los planes de estudio en Ciencia, Tecnología, Ingeniería y Matemáticas (STEM), Bellas Artes y Artes Escénicas, y Bachillerato Internacional”. En el condado de Mobile, los estudiantes son aceptados en las escuelas magnet basadas en un sistema de lotería, y deben cumplir con los criterios de ingreso. Otros distritos de Alabama con escuelas ” magnet ” son Huntsville, Montgomery y Decatur.

Lea más: El ranking de escuelas secundarias ” magnet ” de tu estado, según U.S. News & World Report (**esta lista puede no incluir todas las opciones magnet de tu estado)

 

Alaska:

Alaska tiene un puñado de escuelas magnet diseminadas por todo el estado. La escuela magnet Barnette, ubicada en el distrito de Fairbanks North Star Borough, describe su oferta de aprendizaje de esta manera: “El “imán de Barnette o ‘draw’ es una combinación de: pequeñas clases de exploración, un programa comunitario Friday in Fairbanks, y noches de exhibición trimestrales para todas las escuelas. Estos son los elementos de la escuela que la diferencian de otras escuelas y hacen que la experiencia de la escuela magnet sea gratificante tanto para los estudiantes como para los padres”.

Lea más: El ranking de escuelas secundarias ” magnet ” de tu estado, según U.S. News & World Report  (**esta lista puede no incluir todas las opciones ” magnet ” de tu estado).

 

Arizona:

Hay muchas opciones de escuelas magnet en Arizona. Por ejemplo, el Distrito Escolar Unificado de Tucson en Arizona tiene actualmente doce escuelas “magnet”. Estas incluyen escuelas que se enfocan en artes de la comunicación, lenguaje dual, STEM, Montessori, y estudio para estudiantes sobresalientes.  

 

Arkansas:

Arkansas tiene varias escuelas magnet diseminadas por todo el estado. Los distritos con escuelas magnet incluyen Hot Springs, Marion, y el Texarkana Arkansas School District No.7. Encuentre información sobre distritos en Arkansas central aquí.

 

California:

Dependiendo de donde viva en California, podrá elegir una escuela magnet. Para el año escolar 2021, hay más de 500 escuelas magnet en California. Los distritos con escuelas ” magnet ” incluyen el ABC Unified School DistrictGlendale Unified School DistrictLos Angeles Unified School District  más información sobre este distrito aqui, el Napa Valley Unified School DistrictPasadena Unified School DistrictSan Diego Unified School District  más  informacion sobre este distrito aqui, y  Vista Unified School District. Una nueva escuela magnet asesorada por George Clooney y otras personas influyentes de Hollywood se está preparando para abrir en el centro de Los Ángeles en 2022. La escuela preparará a los estudiantes para trabajos en la industria del entretenimiento.

 

Colorado:

Colorado tiene más de 20 escuelas magnet en todo el estado. Los distritos con escuelas “magnet” incluyen Denver Public SchoolsMapleton Public Schools, y Douglas County School District.

Recientemente entrevistamos a una escuela magnet de Colorado, la New Emerson School en Columbus, de la que pueden leer aquí.

 

Connecticut:

Connecticut tiene más de 80 escuelas magnet de las que las familias pueden elegir. Para una lista completa de las escuelas magnet del área de Greater Hartford. Para una lista completa de escuelas “magnet” fuera del área de Greater Hartford, haga clic aquí. También puede encontrar preguntas frecuentes sobre las escuelas “magnet” de Connecticut aquí.

 

Delaware:

Delaware tiene unas cuantas escuelas magnet diseminadas por todo el estado; esta podría ser una gran opción si hay una cerca de usted y su hijo aprende mejor enfocándose en un tema que le apasiona. La Cab Calloway School of the Arts  en el Distrito Escolar Consolidado de Red Clay, por ejemplo, permite a los estudiantes especializarse en danza, medios digitales, música vocal, artes escénicas y más. Conrad Schools of Science, también en el Distrito Escolar Consolidado de Red Clay, ofrece un magnet de ciencias de la vida. En el distrito escolar de Indian River, la Escuela de Artes del Sur de Delaware trata de facilitar el aprendizaje de los estudiantes a través de las artes.

Delaware CAN es una organizacion local que le podría proporcionar más info sobre estas escuelas. 

 

Florida:

Florida tiene más de 500 escuelas magnet en todo el estado. Para saber si su distrito tiene programas magnet, use la opción de búsqueda de escuelas en el sitio web del Departamento de Educación de Florida. Simplemente seleccione su distrito y haga clic en “Go”. Si hay escuelas o programas magnet en su distrito, la herramienta los mostrará y listará su enfoque (ciencia, artes escénicas, medicina, tecnología, etc.) Encuentre información especifica de Miami aquí.

 

Georgia:

Georgia tiene más de diez escuelas maget diseminadas por todo el estado. Los distritos con escuelas magnet incluyen Bibb County School DistrictRichmond County School System, y Muscogee County School District. Además, las escuelas públicas del condado de Clayton ofrecen varios programas “magnet”.

 

Hawaii:

Desafortunadamente, no hay escuelas magnet públicas independientes que funcionen actualmente en Hawaii. Puede que haya programas magnet en las escuelas públicas tradicionales, y la ley permite escuelas magnet independientes, ¡así que manténgase en sintonía para el futuro! Aunque técnicamente no son programas magnet, Hawái ofrece programas complementarios para estudiantes superdotados y talentosos.

 

Idaho:

Idaho tiene más de 20 escuelas magnet o escuelas con programas magnet.  Puede ver una lista de estas escuelas en el sitio web del Departamento de Educación de Idaho. Las ubicaciones de los programas magnet de Idaho incluyen Boise, Meridian, Eagle, Hailey, Idaho Falls, Nampa, Ammon y Coeur d’Alene.

Además, a través del programa de Oportunidades Avanzadas del estado, a cada estudiante de escuela pública en Idaho se le asigna $ 4,125 para usar en los grados 7-12. Estos fondos se pueden utilizar para créditos duales, tarifas de exámenes de ubicación avanzada, certificaciones profesionales, capacitación de la fuerza laboral u otros gastos calificados.

 

Illinois: 

Hay más de 100 escuelas magnet en Illinois. Muchas de ellas se concentran en el Distrito de las Escuelas Públicas de Chicago; puede buscar estos tipos de escuelas, utilizando la herramienta de búsqueda de las Escuelas Públicas de Chicago y filtrando por escuelas magnet aquí. Otros distritos, como el Champaign Unit School District 4, Elgin Area Schools U-46, Rockford Public Schools y Decatur Public Schools, también tienen escuelas magnet.

 

Indiana:

Indiana tiene varias escuelas magnet que las familias pueden considerar. En el distrito de las escuelas públicas de Indianápolis, por ejemplo, hay 17 escuelas magnet elementales e intermedias. Mientras tanto, la Corporación Escolar de la Comunidad de South Bend tiene más de 20 escuelas o programas magnet  

 

Iowa:

Iowa tiene varias escuelas magnet diseminadas por todo el estado. En el Distrito Escolar de the Cedar Rapids Community School District, por ejemplo, hay cinco escuelas magnet, incluida Johnson STEAM Academy, que ha sido clasificada como una de las mejores escuelas magnet de los Estados Unidos.

 

Kansas:

Las escuelas magnet permiten a los niños centrarse en temas específicos, como la ciencia o las artes escénicas. Como describe el distrito de escuelas públicas de Wichita, “Las escuelas magnet se basan en la premisa de que no todos los estudiantes aprenden de la misma manera, así que si hay un tema unificador o una estructura organizativa diferente para los estudiantes de interés similar, esos estudiantes aprenderán más en todas las áreas”. En el distrito de Wichita, hay 17 escuelas primarias “magnet” y siete escuelas intermedias, secundarias y K-8 “magnet”, y hay otras en todo el estado, como en Hutchinson, Kansas City y Topeka.

 

Kentucky:

Kentucky tiene una variedad de escuelas y programas magnet diseminados por todo el estado, incluyendo varios en Fayette County Public Schools y Jefferson County Public Schools. Las Escuelas Públicas del Condado de Fayette, por ejemplo, describen cómo tienen escuelas magnet con estos enfoques: “Ciencias biomédicas (Frederick Douglass High School), Programa de Diploma de Bachillerato Internacional (Tates Creek High School), programas tradicionales (LTMS), educación prescrita individualmente (Dixie ), Inmersión en español (Maxwell y Bryan Station escuela intermedia y escuela secundaria); ciencia, tecnología, ingeniería, artes y matemáticas (STEAM Academy y Rise STEM Academy for Girls); y plan de estudios enseñado a través de la lente de la historia y la cultura afroamericanas (academias Carter G. Woodson)”.

 

Louisiana:

Louisiana tiene varias escuelas magnet en todo el estado. Algunos distritos de Luisiana con escuelas magnet incluyen las escuelas Caddo Parish Public Schools, Calcasieu Parish Public Schools, East Baton Rouge Parish, Iberville Parish Schools, Tangipahoa Parish School District. El East Baton Rouge Parish School System, por ejemplo, tiene escuelas magnet que permiten a los estudiantes enfocarse en medicina, artes visuales y escénicas, ciencias de la salud, negocios y asuntos gubernamentales o ingeniería.

 

Maine:

Actualmente hay dos escuelas magnet en Maine. La Maine School of Science and Mathematics se centra en STEM y está situada en Limestone, Maine. El estado también tiene una escuela magnet pública orientada al estudio de la ciencia marina, la tecnología, el transporte y la ingeniería: The Maine Ocean School.

Si vive cerca de una de las escuelas magnet de Maine, es posible que su hijo pueda asistir a la escuela magnet pública en lugar de a la escuela pública de su vecindario.

 

Maryland:

Maryland tiene varias escuelas magnet en todo el estado; por ejemplo, hay más de 30 escuelas o programas magnet en el área del condado de Baltimore. Algunos de los otros distritos con escuelas “magnet” incluyen Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Washington County Public Schools y Prince George’s County Public Schools.

 

Massachusetts:

Massachusetts tiene sólo un puñado de escuelas magnet, como por ejemplo,  Worcester Arts Magnet School and Tatnuck Magnet School. Pero, puede contactar con su distrito escolar para ver si hay alguna opción cerca de usted.

 

Michigan:

Michigan tiene varias escuelas magnet en todo el estado. The International Academy of Macomb, por ejemplo, es una escuela magnet del International Baccalaureate que abarca todo el condado y que cada año ofrece a sus estudiantes la oportunidad de viajar por todo el mundo. El Lansing School District ofrece más de 10 escuelas o programas magnet. Otros distritos con ofertas del programa magnet incluyen las escuelas Michigan City Area Schools, Detroit Public Schools, Ann Arbor Public Schools y más.

 

Minnesota:

Minnesota tiene más de 75 escuelas magnet en todo el estado. Por ejemplo, algunos de los distritos con escuelas o programas magnet incluyen Anoka-Hennepin School District #11, Brooklyn Center Community Schools, Buffalo-Hanover-Montrose Schools, District 196: Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan, Independent School District 197, Minneapolis Public Schools, Northwest Suburban Integration District, y Osseo Area Schools ISD 279.

 

Mississippi:

Mississippi tiene varias escuelas magnet para que las familias consideren. Algunos de los distritos con escuelas o programas magnet incluyen el Cleveland School District y Jackson Public Schools. 

 

Missouri:

Missouri tiene varias escuelas magnet en todo el estado. Para más informacion, puede visitar una muestra de las escuelas primarias magnet disponibles en el distrito escolar público de St. Louis, Kansas City Public Schools también tienen escuelas magnet.

 

Montana:

Las escuela magnet están permitidas en Montana, aunque actualmente no tenemos conocimiento de ninguna escuela magnet activa.

 

Nebraska:

Nebraska tiene un puñado de escuelas magnet diseminadas por todo el estado. Por ejemplo, Omaha Public Schools tienen programas magnet tanto para la escuela primaria como para la secundaria. 

 

Nevada:

Hace unos años, un artículo del Las Vegas Sun describió las escuelas magnet como “escuelas dentro de escuelas”. En otras palabras, ofrecen caminos especializados dentro del sistema escolar público. Nevada tiene varias escuelas “magnet” en todo el estado; por ejemplo, hay más de 30 escuelas o programas “magnet” en el Distrito Escolar del Condado de Clark. Otro distrito con escuelas “magnet” es el Washoe County School District.

Puede contactar a Nevada School Choice Coalition para mas información.

 

New Hampshire:

Dependiendo de dónde vivas en New Hampshire, puedes considerar una escuela magnet. Maple Street Magnet School era la única escuela magnet de New Hampshire. Los estudiantes aceptados en la Maple Street Magnet School a través de su lotería ciega pueden elegir asistir a la escuela magnet en lugar de la escuela de su vecindario.

 

New Jersey:

New Jersey tiene varias escuelas magnet en todo el estado. Por ejemplo, puede leer sobre el enfoque de las Escuelas Públicas de Montclair respecto a las escuelas magnet, las ofertas de las Escuelas Técnicas y Vocacionales del Condado de Union y las siete escuelas “magnet” de Newark Public Schools aquí. New Jersey Family recientemente publicó este artículo de opinión con información adicional sobre las escuelas magnet de New Jersey.

 

New Mexico:

Los programas magnet de Nuevo México incluyen los que se centran en STEM, el programa de  Bachillerato Internacional, el plan de estudios de artes y más. La mayoría de las escuelas magnet de New Mexico se concentran en el Distrito Escolar Público de Albuquerque. Puedes aprender más sobre ellas aquí.

 

New York:

New York tiene varias escuelas magnet en todo el estado. Los distritos con escuelas o programas “magnet” incluyen el  NYC Community School District 30, Yonkers Public Schools, Rochester City School District, y muchos más. Busque en tu distrito local para obtener más información.

 

North Carolina:

North Carolina tiene varias escuelas magnet en todo el estado; por ejemplo, los distritos con escuelas o programas magnet incluyen

Cabarrus County Schools, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Durham Public Schools, Mt. Airy City Schools, Surry County Schools, Wake County Public School System, y Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools. Una de escuela magnet en Charlotte ganó reconocimiento nacional por su desempeño

Entrevistamos a una escuela magnet de North Carolina, Atkins Academic and Technology High School, aquí

 

North Dakota:

Desafortunadamente, no hay escuelas públicas independientes en North Dakota. Puede haber programas magnet en las escuelas públicas tradicionales, y la ley permite escuelas magnet independientes, ¡así que manténgase en sintonía en el futuro!

 

Ohio:

En Ohio, hay varias escuelas y programas magnet en todo el estado. Por ejemplo, puede leer más sobre las escuelas magnet en el distrito de las escuelas públicas de Cincinnati aquí.  También puede leer sobre las escuelas magnet de Lima City Schools aquí o en School Choice Ohio.

 

Oklahoma:

Oklahoma tiene varias escuelas y programas magnet para que los considere. Por ejemplo, los distritos con escuelas o programas magnet incluyen Oklahoma City Public Schools , Muskogee Public Schools, Tulsa Public Schools y más. Puede contactar a Choice Matters para mas informacion en espanol.

 

Oregon:

Hay varias escuelas magnet en Oregon. Por ejemplo, puede leer sobre las opciones de las escuelas magnet del Distrito Escolar de Bend La Pine aquí, las de las Escuelas Públicas de Portland y las de las Escuelas de Beaverton

 

Pennsylvania:

Pensilvania tiene varias escuelas magnet en todo el estado. Por ejemplo, Pittsburgh Public Schools y el School District of Philadelphia tienen opciones magnet, entre otras.

 

Rhode Island:

Rhode Island sólo tiene un par de escuelas magnet en la actualidad, como la Classical High School en Providence, que se centra en el estudio de las artes, los idiomas y humanidades. 

 

South Carolina:

South Carolina tiene más de treinta opciones magnet en todo el estado, y éstas podrían ser una buena opción si su hijo aprende mejor enfocándose en un tema que le apasiona. Por ejemplo, los distritos con opciones magnet incluyen  Fairfield County School District, Florence County School District Three, Lexington-Richland School District Five, Richland County School District One, y Richland School District Two.

También entrevistamos al director de una de las mejores escuelas públicas de América, la Academic Magnet High School, aquí.

 

South Dakota:

South Dakota es uno de los cuatro estados que no tiene actualmente ninguna escuela magnet. Puede haber programas magnet en las escuelas públicas tradicionales, y la ley permite escuelas magnet independientes, ¡así que manténgase en sintonía en el futuro!

 

Tennessee:

Tennessee tiene varias escuelas magnet. Por ejemplo, Knox County School District, Metropolitan Nashville Public School District, Rutherford County School District, y Shelby County School District todos ofrecen opciones magnet, entre otras.

 

Texas:

Texas tiene muchas escuelas magnet. Por ejemplo, Aldine ISDDallas ISD en grados 6-8 o de grados 9-12, DeSoto ISD, Galveston ISD, Houston ISD, y Richardson ISD todos ofrecen opciones magnet. También puede estar interesado en revisar el ranking de las escuelas secundarias ” magnet ” de Texas en U.S. News & World’s report aquí. Por favor, tenga en cuenta que la lista puede no ser exhaustiva y debe consultar con su distrito local sobre las opciones más cercanas a usted.

 

Utah:

Utah tiene actualmente sólo unas pocas escuelas o programas magnet. Las escuelas públicas del Distrito Escolar de Ogden tienen algunos programas magnet. El Distrito Escolar de Salt Lake City también ofrece algunos programas magnet de aprendizaje extendido.

 

Vermont:

Actualmente, Vermont tiene al menos dos escuelas magnet. Sustainability Academy se centra en la justicia social, ambiental y económica para las comunidades. Integrated Arts Academy, por su parte, se centra en la música, el drama, el movimiento y las artes visuales. Ambas escuelas magnet están en Burlington Vermont School District.

 

Virginia:

Virginia tiene varias opciones de escuelas magnet, incluyendo la bien clasificada Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology. Los distritos escolares con escuelas magnet incluyen Fairfax County Public Schools, Newport News Public Schools, York County School Division, Hampton City Schools entre otras.

 

Washington:

Washington tiene varias escuelas y programas magnet en todo el estado. Por ejemplo, cualquier estudiante del Distrito Escolar de Lake Washington que entre en el 9º grado para el próximo año escolar es bienvenido a aplicar a Tesla STEM High School. Busque en su distrito local para ver si hay alguna opción magnet disponible para usted.

 

West Virginia:

West Virginia tiene un puñado de escuelas magnet en el estado. Por ejemplo, puede leer sobre algunas de las opciones de las escuelas magnet en el condado de Kanawha aquí

 

Wisconsin:

Wisconsin tiene varias opciones de programas magnet esparcidos por todo el estado. Puedes ver algunos de estos programas magnet, por ejemplo, en el sitio web del Departamento de Educación del estado.

 

Wyoming:

Desafortunadamente, no hay escuelas públicas independientes con programa magnet en Wyoming. Puede que haya programas magnet en las escuelas públicas tradicionales, y la ley permite escuelas magnet independientes, ¡así que manténgase en sintonía en el futuro!

Buscar Escuelas Cercanas

School Type
Traditional public schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public charter schools do not charge tuition. They are usually managed by nonprofit organizations and do not require students to pass tests to enroll.
Public magnet schools do not charge tuition. They are managed by school districts and focus on themes, such as math, science, technology, and the arts.
Private schools charge tuition, but scholarships are often available via state programs or by individual schools. Private schools are privately managed and can be faith-based or secular.
Grade Levels
 

Comparte estos datos sobre escuelas magnet

magnet infographic long

 

Fuente: The School Choice Roadmap, por Andrew Campanella

Click aquí para descargar y compartir mas datos

escuelas magnet

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La información de esta guía está diseñada para ayudar a las familias que están considerando las escuelas magnet en su proceso de toma de decisiones. Nuestra misión es proporcionar a las familias la información que necesitan sobre todas las opciones de escuelas disponibles – públicas tradicionales, públicas chárter, públicas magnet, privadas, en línea y en el hogar – para que puedan elegir la adecuada para su hijo. Para obtener más guías sobre la elección de otros tipos de escuelas, haga clic aquí.

 

The Ultimate Guide to Public Magnet Schools

Imagine sending your daughter to a school that seems tailor-made to fit her fascination with science. Imagine finding a school for your son that sparks his curiosity about music. Imagine an entire school centered around one big theme – a theme that is used as a “hook” to help teach students about every subject.

More than 4,000 of these unique schools exist, all across the U.S. And guess what? They’re not elite private schools. They’re tuition-free public schools. They’re public magnet schools!

What do you need to know about public magnet school choice?

Get a quick rundown.

Magnet schools are free public schools that focus on particular themes, like performing arts or medical science. If you’re interested in learning more, this ultimate guide to public magnet schools is for you. Click on the buttons below to find a magnet school definition, answers to your magnet questions, links to resources in your state, and more. 

“Magnet schools. Have you heard of them? @SchoolChoiceWk created this starter guide to spread the news about these free public schools that often go under the radar.”

Sign up to learn even more about School Choice in your state!

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Magnet School FAQ

What is a magnet school?

Magnet schools are free public schools operated by school districts that allow kids to focus on a specific learning track, such as STEM, medical science, or performing arts. At a magnet school, all subjects are taught through the lenses of the school’s specific track. At an arts-focused magnet school, for example, students will learn all required classes (math, English, etc.). But, those required classes may include arts-related projects or discussions, and students will take a variety of arts classes as well. When teachers and students share a common passion for a subject, it can make for a vibrant learning community.

Finding a magnet school definition can be confusing! For example, some traditional public schools have magnet programs that a subset of students opt into. While those schools aren’t magnet schools in the fullest sense, their magnet programs can still offer the benefit of focusing on a particular theme.  

Many of us go to college and we don’t really know what we want to do; we may change our major two or three times. Sometimes having a choice in high school, even elementary school, clarifies that for students. Or, it just exposes them to another area they otherwise wouldn’t see in a traditional school.

Agnes Perry, DeBakey High School for Health Professions

Can anyone attend a magnet school? How do you get in?

Students are rarely, if ever, automatically assigned to magnet schools. Instead, families can choose to apply to a magnet school and, if accepted, attend it rather than their zoned school or the school nearest them. 

Sometimes, magnet schools are so popular that they rely on randomized lotteries to determine acceptance. If this is the case for a magnet school you’re interested in, you can submit an application to the school before its deadline. Then, you will be notified if there is space and your child has been accepted. Families with siblings already attending the school may be prioritized.

In addition, some magnet schools may have eligibility requirements. For instance, a magnet school with a music focus may require students to audition. The steps will be clearly outlined by each individual magnet school or program.

 

When to apply for magnet schools?

Districts have varying deadlines for magnet school applications, so we recommend you check with your local district! But, in our experience, the magnet application window can happen surprisingly early, especially in places where magnet schools are popular. Often, the application window for the next school year begins as early as November.

 

How much does a magnet school cost?

Importantly, magnet schools are public schools and thus free to attend for any student. Like all public schools, magnet schools are funded by taxpayers. Since magnet schools are public schools, transportation is typically free and provided as well. You can explore per-pupil spending for public schools, including magnet schools, at Project Nickel.

 

How long have magnet schools been around?

The history of magnet schools dates back to the 1960s and 1970s. Some of the earliest magnet schools were McCarver Elementary School in Washington, established in 1968, and Skyline High School in Texas, established in 1971.

 

Why magnet school?  

Magnet schools provide an exciting opportunity for kids to learn in a place where they’re immersed in a subject they love. For instance, Dr. Michael Lofton, founder of a magnet school in South Carolina told us, “[Students] really tend to delve a little bit deeper into study if they enjoy it more and it’s something that they want to relate to.” 

How to Choose a Magnet School

We encourage parents to follow the seven steps outlined in The School Choice Roadmap: 7 Steps to Finding the Right School for Your Childa Foreward Indies award finalist, for all school search matters. This thorough, understandable process is designed to help all families identify learning environments that meet their children’s needs. These steps include:

1.Explore your magnet school options:

Is there a magnet school near you? You can find out using our free Schools Near Me tool. You can also research your options by checking out our state-by-state list of magnet school resources below, or by Googling your school district and “magnet schools” to get recent info about your locality. Remember, since magnet schools hone in on a particular theme, you’ll want to carefully consider what your child’s interests and aptitudes are. 

 

2.Connect: 

If there’s a magnet school that interests you, reach out for more information. You may also want to take a tour! Here are some questions you can ask: When can you can apply? (Magnet schools usually have a specified deadline for applications.) Are there any entrance requirements? (About 75% of magnet schools do not have entrance requirements. But, others do have auditions or special requirements.) What is your approach to education? Is there a lottery to decide which students are accepted? Do you provide transportation? (Most, but not all, magnet schools provide transportation.)

 

3.Apply:

Once your questions have been answered, you can move forward with applying. After completing an application, you are usually notified of your status via email or mail.

If your student is selected, you may need to officially “accept” your seat by a specified deadline. The school will provide you with information regarding what they need prior to you joining the school. 

Your student may receive an “alternate pool” or “waitlist” status. This means that your child may be able to receive a seat if one opens up in coming weeks.

If the magnet school does not have a spot for your child this year, you may need to choose another school. We know this can be disappointing. But, don’t be discouraged from trying again next year if you’re still interested. 

 

4.Get started:

If your child is accepted into the magnet school, you can let your previous school know that you will be transferring. You can also ask them if there is anything you need to do on their end. As a parent/legal guardian, you can ask the school for a copy of your student’s educational record. If your student has any additional services, such as an intervention plan, Individualized Education Program, 504 plan, or medical response plan, make sure that a copy of this information gets sent to the new school as well!

Magnet School Options in Your State

There are more than 4,000 magnet schools across the country serving about 3.5 million children. In addition, there are thousands of magnet programs within traditional public schools nationwide. Magnet schools, theme-based schools, or magnet programs are permitted in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. In some states, as indicated on the map below, there are no freestanding magnet schools, but there may be magnet programs available in traditional public schools.

Do you have magnet schools? Check out your state’s parent guide or scroll below to learn whether your state has any magnet schools. Again, we also suggest using the Schools Near Me tool to search your zip code, and talking to your local district about magnet options.

AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY DC